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1 – 10 of 53
Article
Publication date: 3 January 2022

Ana Claudia Mazzonetto, Ana Carolina Fernandes, Aretusa Dias de Souza, Vanessa Mello Rodrigues, Tailane Scapin, Paula Lazzarin Uggioni, Marcela Boro Veiros, Greyce Luci Bernardo and Rossana Pacheco da Costa Proença

This study aimed to examine the perceptions and preferences of Brazilian adult consumers about four different front-of-pack (FOP) food labeling systems proposed by the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine the perceptions and preferences of Brazilian adult consumers about four different front-of-pack (FOP) food labeling systems proposed by the Brazilian National Health Regulatory Agency.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study conducted with 33 participants allocated in six focus groups. Four different types of FOP labels were displayed on processed and packaged bread: three interpretive warning labels (black triangle, black octagon and red ellipse) and a hybrid model (nutritional traffic light). Thematic analysis was used to identify the key topics addressed by participants.

Findings

Three topics were identified: label design, clarity and precision of information. The results demonstrated an influence of labels on product development and consumers' food choices. Most participants expressed a preference for black warning labels and reported the importance of statements endorsed by the Ministry of Health, which provide credibility and could influence food choices. Furthermore, participants agreed that the traffic light system provides more information but is difficult to interpret when comparing products. Warning labels were reported to have the greatest influence on purchase decisions. However, participants were concerned about how to understand the lack of warning labels on some products.

Practical implications

The results may help and support the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency to identify and recommend the most effective FOP labeling system to be adopted in Brazil.

Originality/value

Few studies investigating adult consumers' perceptions of different FOP label formats have been conducted in the Brazilian context. Our study contributes to the small pool of evidence on the topic by demonstrating that FOP labels can be helpful for consumers when they are presented in an intuitive, interpretative and trustworthy format.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Emma Beacom, Lynsey Elizabeth Hollywood, Christopher McLaughlin, Sinead Furey, Ruth Price, Una McMahon-Beattie and Amy Burns

The purpose of this study is to investigate the proportionality of market brand (MB) foods versus supermarket own brand (OB) foods sold on promotion and to compare their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the proportionality of market brand (MB) foods versus supermarket own brand (OB) foods sold on promotion and to compare their healthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

An existing dataset containing nutritional information about a variety of foods on promotion (n = 6,776) from 48 stores across 8 retail chains in Northern Ireland (NI) was reanalysed. Product healthiness was measured using a score aligned to the Food Standards Agency's Front of Pack nutrient labelling system. MBs and OBs were considered as a whole and in their respective subsets–international/national and regional MBs, and premium, mid-market and value tiered OBs.

Findings

Results found a balance in favour of health (52.4% amber/green versus 47.6% red) across retailers' promotions in NI. Further, OB products were often found to be superior to MBs with regards to overall healthfulness, and regional brands were found to be less healthy than international/national brands.

Research limitations/implications

Findings rationale further retail research to compare nutritionally OB and MB product types, and further consumer research regarding important attributes of OBs.

Practical implications

Retailers should communicate the comparative healthiness of their OBs in comparison to MB alternatives, in addition to communicating comparative price savings. There is opportunity for retailers to increase visibility of mid-market and value OB tiers, and for regional MBs to improve the nutritional profile of products in line with the consumer trend for health.

Originality/value

This study provides a contribution by using data on OBs and MBs on promotion, and by investigating the nutritional differences between different tiers of OB and MB products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

D.J. Van Camp, N.H. Hooker and D.M. Souza‐Monteiro

This paper aims to determine the response of manufacturers and retailers to voluntary UK front of package (FOP) schemes through food product innovations.

2024

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the response of manufacturers and retailers to voluntary UK front of package (FOP) schemes through food product innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

A food innovation database (Global New Products Database) was used to track all food products released in the UK from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2008. Meal, bakery and breakfast cereal products were classified into two groups, according to whether the food category was targeted by the Food Standard Agency (FSA) for FOP labelling. Analysis includes descriptive statistics and cross‐tabulations of factors such as product category, type of FOP scheme, company, and year.

Findings

Private label brands dominate food innovations in the UK. The use of FOP labels is selective among companies and across food categories. Guideline daily allowance (GDA) labelling is more widely adopted than the traffic light labelling system (TLS). Both systems have been more broadly adopted in target food categories when compared to non‐target food categories.

Research limitations/implications

The database used to conduct this research provides detailed data on food product innovations released in the UK. However, this is not linked to sales data and therefore cannot be used to analyse changes in consumption due to FOP labelling systems. Nevertheless, the response of food manufacturers and retailers in their innovation strategies is a critical piece to understanding how voluntary labelling polices may impact public health.

Originality/value

The paper presents evidence of dynamics of supply‐side responses to increasing consumer demand for healthier foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2013

My Bui, Velitchka D. Kaltcheva, Anthony Patino and Richard C. Leventhal

– This research aims to examine the effects of varying front-of-package (FOP) nutrition information type on parents' food product choices for children.

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Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the effects of varying front-of-package (FOP) nutrition information type on parents' food product choices for children.

Design/methodology/approach

A 3(FOP nutrition information: nutrient specific system vs food group information system vs summary indicator system) × 3(Perceived healthiness of the product: high vs moderate vs low) mixed-design experiment and content analysis were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Findings suggest that summary indicator systems were effective in positively impacting parents' choices for healthier food options, however not as effective as food group information systems – which includes specific nutrient content claims complementing less familiar health nutrient symbols.

Originality/value

Implications for marketers, consumer welfare advocates and product brand managers are provided.

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

John L Stanton, James Wiley, Neal H Hooker and Ekaterina Salnikova

The purpose of this paper is to compare the use of front of package (FOP) claims within product categories by private label (PL) products and national brands (NB). This…

2052

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the use of front of package (FOP) claims within product categories by private label (PL) products and national brands (NB). This research adapts an existing conceptual model exploring the marketing strategies of PL products and NBs.

Design/methodology/approach

Information for this study came from Mintel’s Global (2009/2011). There were 10,791 products launched in 2011 in the US database, 8,120 NB and 2,671 PL food and drink products. For 2009: 5,838 NB and 2,118 PL that gives 7,956 food and beverages products launched in USA.

Findings

PL and NB companies increased the usage of FOP claims, and also often moved in the same direction for some product categories. The greatest number of increases across product categories for PL and NB between 2009 and 2011 were Ethical-Enviromentally Friendly Packaging; Allergen; Fiber; Weight Control; Gluten Free; Kosher and No Additives claims. There were much less FOP that were decreased in usage. The claims that most frequently decreased were “Organic,” “Calories,” and “Vitamin/Mineral Fortified.” The categories that significantly decreased the “Organic” claim were Baby Food, Bakery, Breakfast Cereals, Fruit and Vegetables among PL product categories and Breakfast Cereals, Dairy, Side Dishes and Soup among NB categories.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on only a three-year time span. difference over a greater period of time could reveal more significant differences.

Practical implications

The evidence from this research indicates that PL brands are matching NBs as they look to using other attributes and benefits. However, as PL sales increase, retailer margins increase which can lead to further aggressive marketing by the PL brands.

Originality/value

The analysis of FOP claims for PL and NB over such a large sample has not previously been done.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Ekaterina Salnikova, John L. Stanton and Neal Hooker

– This paper aims to compare the use of front-of-pack nutrition claims made on 32,257 food labels launched in 2009 in the US and the EU.

744

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the use of front-of-pack nutrition claims made on 32,257 food labels launched in 2009 in the US and the EU.

Design/methodology/approach

Information from Mintel's Global New Product Database was analyzed, for 25,417 products launched in the EU and 6,840 in the US. The hypothesis was that “products launched in the US and EU have a different frequency of front-of-pack nutrition claims”. Using inferential statistics, significant differences (two-tailed Z-tests) in the number of claims are explored and compared to differences in legislation standards and consumer preferences.

Findings

The initial analysis revealed that there were six significant differences between the presence of the seven health and nutrition claims across 16 product categories in the US and the EU. Further analysis of the 16 product categories revealed a range of significant differences between the frequency of US and EU claims.

Originality/value

The emerging relevance of front-of-pack nutrition labeling as a marketing tool makes such differences pertinent. This paper marks the first systematic comparison of the use of claims between the US and EU.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Hsuan-Hsuan Ku and Yi-Ting Chang

Individuals concerned about safety comprise a significant share of the consumer market today. This paper aims to provide the results of a study on when a front-of-package …

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals concerned about safety comprise a significant share of the consumer market today. This paper aims to provide the results of a study on when a front-of-package (FOP) claim about “no added negatives” can serve as a quality cue.

Design/methodology/approach

Four between-subjects experiments examine consumers’ quality perceptions in responses to the absence-focused claims and also identifies brand parity (Studies 1a and 1b) and the associated launch of inconsistent alternatives as moderators (Study 2) and investigate the extent to which the quality signaling value of absence-focused claims varies as a function of message regulatory focus (Study 3).

Findings

Research shows that a unique absence-focused claim indicates product quality (Studies 1a and 1b). However, there could be a cost in terms of reduced perceived quality when adding an inconsistent alternative to a brand (Study 2). Furthermore, consumers associate greater product quality with absence-focused FOP claims if an appeal is framed as prevention-focused rather than promotion-focused benefits (Study 3).

Originality/value

This study advances knowledge on the effects of front-of-package claims on consumer behavior and benefits marketers in determining effective front-of-package messages for product promotion.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2020

Cayetano Medina-Molina and Benito Pérez-González

Spain decided to implement NutriScore with the objective of helping consumers to choose healthier foods. NutriScore is a summary indicator interpretative nutritional…

Abstract

Purpose

Spain decided to implement NutriScore with the objective of helping consumers to choose healthier foods. NutriScore is a summary indicator interpretative nutritional labelling. This study aims to verify whether the coexistence with other interpretative labelling may influence NutriScore effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to analyse two different brands in the same category; one of them ranked with a “B” NutriScore rating and the other with a “D” NutriScore rating. The product packaging was shown in four different ways: without indications, with nutrient-specific labels, with summary indicators (NutriScore) and with both interpretative indicators. Having positive and negative evaluations of NutriScore allowed us to assess its impact. Structural equation modelling (SEM), Student t-test and F-test were employed with a sample of 301 questionnaires.

Findings

The different formats of the interpretative labels did not moderate the relationship between perceived healthiness and purchase intention. When a food product is given positive evaluation from NutriScore, nutrient-specific interpretative labelling reinforces the effect of NutriScore. When a food product is given negative evaluation from NutriScore, nutrient specific interpretative labelling cancels the effect of NutriScore on perceived healthiness and purchase intention.

Originality/value

Previous studies have analysed the interaction between NutriScore and nutrient-specific interpretative labels, but they attribute a negative message to the product (warning labels). This study was aimed at analysing the interaction between NutriScore and summary indicators nutrient specific with positive message about the nutritional quality of the food item.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Ekaterina Salnikova and John L. Stanton

The interest of food consumers in improved quality, healthiness, freshness, and authenticity results in a growing introduction of new food products featuring a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

The interest of food consumers in improved quality, healthiness, freshness, and authenticity results in a growing introduction of new food products featuring a variety of “positive” (e.g. “Enriched with Vitamin D”) and “negative” (e.g. “Low in Fat”) label claims. It's the goal of this paper to uncover how the presence of positive and absence of negative benefits or attributes balance in the minds of consumers, determine which label claims would have the greatest impact on consumers' intention to buy milk, and understand the role of stating these in either a positive or a negative frame.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the objectives of this paper, we utilize (1) descriptive study to identify which claims are currently used by the dairy marketing practitioners, (2) focus group to identify the importance of positive and negative product claims, and (3) online survey including discrete choice experiment (DCE) to determine the effect of positive and negative claims on consumer food choices.

Findings

We provide evidence of negative bias in consumers facing the choice between foods with enriched positive ingredients vs foods that are free-from negative ingredients. Specifically, we find that consumers have a general tendency toward giving negative attributes more weight than positive ones.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted in one food category.

Practical implications

This research should encourage food marketers to include more positive statements about their products rather than the current focus on negatives such as no GMOs or no hormones. the authors understand these negative attributes need to be made but there should also be positive attributes.

Social implications

Consumers will get a total picture of the product values and not skewed to one point.

Originality/value

The concept of negative bias has not be adequately explored in the food category on product labels.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Sinne Smed, Anna Kristina Edenbrandt, Pia Koch-Hansen and Leon Jansen

The purpose of this paper is to determine how the typical purchasers of products with nutrition symbols differ from other purchasers with respect to socio-demographic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how the typical purchasers of products with nutrition symbols differ from other purchasers with respect to socio-demographic characteristics. Furthermore the authors examine if the typical purchaser is similar across six product types in Denmark and in the Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors estimate probit models using a representative panel of households registering all their daily purchases during a year, three years after the introduction of a nutrition symbol in Denmark and the Netherlands (the Keyhole and the Choices). The purchase data are matched with information about labelling status. Other product and purchase characteristics, such as store-type and organic, are controlled for.

Findings

Households with children tend to have a lower probability of purchasing labelled products compared to other household types, while urbanity increases the probability. This holds both across countries and across products. In Denmark education is positively correlated with label purchase, while in the Netherlands it is income. Generally, the observable characteristics of the consumers are poor in explaining the probability of purchasing labelled products which suggests that other aspects as the underlying attitudes and general health awareness may be of greater importance in identifying these consumers.

Originality/value

There is a lack of studies analysing the effect of front-of-pack symbols on households’ product choices based on observed data as most previous studies are based on stated observation or purchase intentions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 53