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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2022

Florence YY Ling and Elsie Kai Ying Mok

This study aims to investigate how to manage the stressors that facility managers (FMs) face with the aim of reducing their stress and strain levels.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how to manage the stressors that facility managers (FMs) face with the aim of reducing their stress and strain levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, stressors are operationalized from job demands, job resources and personal resources constructs. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from FMs based in Singapore.

Findings

FMs have significantly high levels of stress, but they are able to manage this well. Job demands that cause stress and strain are those relating to insufficient time to complete the work and difficulties in handling the work. The lack of job resources in terms of lack of organizational support and inadequate stress mitigation programs are associated with high levels of stress and strain.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations are the relatively small sample size and absence of a database of FMs in Singapore, and correlation is not causation when determining the association between stressors and stress and strain.

Practical implications

Based on the recommendations, employers and FMs may manage the specific stressors identified so that FMs’ stress and strain levels are under control to enable them to work optimally.

Originality/value

This research discovered that the JD-R model is moderated by certain features of facilities management and FMs. When these features are present, FMs are predisposed to more stressors, and higher stress and strain. For the facilities management profession, the discovery is that there are significantly more job demands: for in-house FMs compared to those working for outsourced firms; for FMs who need to carry out estate and asset management, landlord activities and facility planning compared to FMs who focus on operations and maintenance; and for FMs who work longer than five days compared to those who work a five-day week.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Florence Yean Yng Ling, Zhe Zhang and Stephanie Yen Ling Tay

This study aims to investigate how the situational factors that facilities managers (FMs) in Singapore face in their jobs affect their work outcomes. Job situation factors…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the situational factors that facilities managers (FMs) in Singapore face in their jobs affect their work outcomes. Job situation factors such as types of tasks, interpersonal relationships in teams, supervisors’ actions and advancements opportunities are classified into job characteristics, social environment characteristics, leadership and organisational practices categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a systematic literature review, a questionnaire was designed to collect data on work outcomes and job situational factors from FMs working in public housing estates in Singapore. Using the Statistical Package for the Social Science software, inferential statistical analyses were carried out.

Findings

FMs reported that they used economical means and resources to carry out their work significantly frequently and achieved significantly high productivity. Complaints are received significantly frequently and maintenance defects are regularly encountered. Many of the job situational factors are present and found to be significantly correlated with work outcomes and some of these may be used to predict FMs’ work outcomes. Based on the correlation results, the frequency of complaints from residents may be reduced through the following ways: make FMs’ work tasks less challenging; reduce the variety of work tasks that FMs need to execute; reduce FMs’ work volume and speed of work.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to FMs managing public housing estates in Singapore. The work outcomes are self-reported, and thus susceptible to bias. However, as the respondents reported significantly frequent complaints and defects, this might indicate that the bias is not serious.

Practical implications

FMs’ jobs should be broken down into small parts/tasks and assigned to different FMs to specialise. This makes FMs’ tasks less challenging, and allows them to specialise to increase their productivity, improve their quality of work and overcome the problem of high work volume or demanding work speed. By adopting job specialisation, the frequency of receiving complaints from residents may be reduced.

Originality/value

This study discovered strategies to reduce the number of complaints from residents of public housing about facilities management. The contribution to knowledge is that complaints by residents on facilities management can be reduced by adopting job specialisation but not job enlargement. Decomposing work into different tasks and allowing FMs to focus on a few tasks would lead to a reduction in complaints. It also enables FMs to master the skill and complete the tasks without much oversight or supervision.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Angel Martinez Sanchez

Studies some of the factors that played a role in Flexible ManufacturingSystems (FMS) implementation management in Spanish industry. Increasesin production, flexibility…

587

Abstract

Studies some of the factors that played a role in Flexible Manufacturing Systems (FMS) implementation management in Spanish industry. Increases in production, flexibility and technical experience, and improved safety and working conditions, were considered the three main benefits of automation. The training and integration of staff in the project, the firm′s technology level and support from top management are found to be the factors which most influence the positive results of adopting FMS.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2020

Amirhossein Karamoozian and Desheng Wu

Construction projects involve with various risks during all phases of project lifecycle. Failure mode and effective analysis (FMEA) is a useful tool for identifying and…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction projects involve with various risks during all phases of project lifecycle. Failure mode and effective analysis (FMEA) is a useful tool for identifying and eliminating possible risk of failure modes (FMs) and improving the reliability and safety of systems in a broad range of industries. The traditional FMEA method applies risk priority number method (RPN) to calculate risk of FMs. RPN method cannot consider the direct and indirect interdependencies between the FMs and is not appropriate for complex system with numerous components. The purpose of this study is to propose an approach to consider interdependencies between FMs and also using fuzzy theory to consider uncertainties in experts' judgments.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed approach consist of three stages: the first stage of hybrid model used fuzzy FMEA method to identify the failure mode risks and derive the RPN values. The second stage applied Fuzzy Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (FDEMATEL) method to determine the interdependencies between the FMs which are defined through fuzzy FMEA. Then, analytic network process (ANP) is applied in the third stage to calculate the weights of FMs based on the interdependencies that are generated through FDEMATEL method. Finally, weight of FMs through fuzzy FMEA and FDEMATEL–ANP are multiplied to generate the final weights for prioritization. Afterward, a case study for a commercial building project is introduced to illustrate proficiency of model.

Findings

The results showed that the suggested approach could reveal the important FMs and specify the interdependencies between them successfully. Overall, the suggested model can be considered as an efficient hybrid FMEA approach for risk prioritization.

Originality/value

The originality of approach comes from its ability to consider interdependencies between FMs and uncertainties of experts' judgments.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Peter L. Primrose

Although there is a vast body of literature that attempts to define production flexibility, managers are still unable to measure the flexibility they require. However…

1267

Abstract

Although there is a vast body of literature that attempts to define production flexibility, managers are still unable to measure the flexibility they require. However, managers currently are investing in flexible manufacturing systems (FMSs) and planning their manufacturing strategies despite this. Discusses the flexibility and economic viability of FMSs, and concludes that managers do not need to measure the flexibility of an FMS in order to select the correct technical specification. Describes the factors that enable a company to achieve its strategic objectives and suggests that, although increasing flexibility is often quoted as a strategic objective, managers do not need to define or measure flexibility in manufacturing strategy planning. Flexibility just happens to be a convenient word that helps describe the fact that manufacturing facilities must be able to deal with change and uncertainty.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Denis Borenstein, João Luiz Becker and Eduardo Ribas Santos

Flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) design is a complex problem which is concerned with the selection from a wide variety of available system configurations and control…

1199

Abstract

Flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) design is a complex problem which is concerned with the selection from a wide variety of available system configurations and control strategy alternatives in the light of several criteria (costs, production, flexibility etc.), many of which are difficult to quantify. Although there is a reasonable number of currently available modelling tools to be applied in FMS design, they are based on an erroneous approach, in which design is considered as a separated, local and myopic activity. Design is divided into isolated and unconnected subproblems whose individual solutions may result in a poor global solution. This paper describes a methodology of analysis and evaluation of FMS design competitive alternatives. It examines the use of an integrated, systemic, global, and user‐centred approach for solving the FMS design problem.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2018

Mahsa Kassai, Jacob Kaspar, Ahmed Deif and Heather Smith

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to improve the contribution of farmers markets (FMs) to the local food economy and improve their management through a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to improve the contribution of farmers markets (FMs) to the local food economy and improve their management through a new temporary clustering management approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The research encompasses 78 structured interviews with farmers’ market vendors in the central coast region of California. A descriptive statistical and exploratory analysis to capture and evaluate the extent of various clustering activities currently existing in FMs is presented.

Findings

Analysis suggested an existing clustering behavior in FMs with different degrees that would enhance the role of these markets in local food economy. The improved social capital and financial performance of these markets shown in this study outperformed other cluster metrics monitored. Furthermore, there were some positive relationships between knowledge sharing (as a cluster activity) and both integration and financial activities among FMs vendors, highlighting interesting dynamics generated by the temporary nature of these clusters.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on an exploratory research design, investigating a selected number of vendors in the central coast region of California. The research does not claim to provide a comprehensive survey of all FMs.

Practical implications

The analysis resulted in recommendations to improve efficiency of FMs’ practices at both the management level and the strategic level. These recommendations will enhance the contribution of these markets to the local food economy. The results also expand the practical knowledge bodies of regional and local food business development. Finally, the study highlights the social role of FMs through showing social capital as one of the main clustering drivers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to theoretical knowledge concerning the impact of clusters on operation performance by exploring a new temporary proximity that can be added to the existing geographical and digital proximity enriching the clustering approaches debate. Furthermore, the analysis provides specific novel insights into potential operational improvements for current farmers’ market management to enhance their economic and social roles.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Tilak Raj, Ravi Shankar and Mohammed Suhaib

Today's volatile condition of the market is forcing the manufacturing organizations to adapt the flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) to meet the challenges imposed by…

Abstract

Purpose

Today's volatile condition of the market is forcing the manufacturing organizations to adapt the flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) to meet the challenges imposed by international competition, ever‐changing customer demands, rapid delivery to market, and advancement in technology. There are certain enablers, which help in the implementation of FMS or in the transition process from traditional manufacturing system to FMS. The utmost need is to analyze the behavior of these enablers for their effective utilization in the implementation of FMS. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a methodology based on graph theoretical approach for finding the feasibility of transition to FMS for any industry. A universal feasibility index of transition (FIT) is proposed that evaluates and ranks different organizations according to their capability to be converted into FMS. This FIT value is obtained from a permanent feasibility function obtained from an enablers' digraph of FMS.

Findings

The major finding of this paper is that one can judge whether a particular industry is fit for FMS or not by calculating its FIT value. This FIT value can also be utilized in ranking different industries for their possible transition to FMS.

Practical implications

The FIT obtained from a permanent function indicates the strength of enablers and their inter‐relations. More is the value of this index; more will be suitability of that organization for FMS adoption. In this way, managers can judge that a particular organization is suitable or fit for FMS implementation or not, without making the huge investments for such a complex production system and thus, minimize their risks.

Originality/value

Identification, classification of enablers into some important categories, and their analysis is a unique and innovative effort in the area of FMS.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

John Bessant and Bill Haywood

Successful use of flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) depends on a company adopting a flexible approach to its management and organisation. This technology has now begun…

Abstract

Successful use of flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) depends on a company adopting a flexible approach to its management and organisation. This technology has now begun to diffuse widely and to be used in all major developed countries and a small number of developing nations. A comprehensive survey of UK organisations where FMS has been installed or is planned reveals that significant benefits are achievable but the need for a total approach to the problem of implementation is paramount. Technical problems also need to be overcome.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Heidi Marja Rasila and Nils Florian Gersberg

The purpose of this paper is to assess service quality of outsourced facility maintenance services (FMS) from end‐user perspective. For this purpose, a two‐dimensional…

2051

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess service quality of outsourced facility maintenance services (FMS) from end‐user perspective. For this purpose, a two‐dimensional model for service quality in a FMS context is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on interviews in case study organizations.

Findings

The findings suggest that FMS quality may be divided into two industry‐specific dimensions – service recovery quality (response to a service failure) and observed maintenance quality (technical outcome). It seems that the main quality problems are linked to service recovery quality. These problems are caused by personalities of service personnel and lack of communication between end‐users and the service provider.

Practical implications

For FMS providers and building owners it is important to understand the nature of end‐user perceived FMS quality formation. This makes it possible to assess the service provision and to improve the performance of FMS if necessary. If the service recovery processes and observed maintenance quality are not understood well, the improvements may be directed to the wrong processes.

Originality/value

The quality of outsourced FMS is important for employers, employees, building owners and FMS providers. Still, there is very little research on end‐user perceived FMS quality. This paper creates a basis for further research on this important topic.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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