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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Sarich Chotipanich and Sittiporn Issarasak

This paper is a continuing exploration into facilities management (FM) strategy through the arrangement of its decision choices. The purpose of this paper is to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a continuing exploration into facilities management (FM) strategy through the arrangement of its decision choices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the existence of FM operation strategy and to add empirical evidence to this subject to the field of FM and property management. Its main objectives are to gain insights into the arrangement of the FM strategic choices in operation and its relationship with business strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated the configurations of operational approaches and activities that should reflect strategic decisions. The investigation was undertaken through a study of four reputed shopping malls located in Bangkok. The relevant data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the key FM persons of each case study, plus archival document searches, and observations of operational processes. Subsequently, the data were examined in a cross-case analysis to identify the key patterns of relationships between the FM operational arrangements and the business strategy of the mall.

Findings

This study found that the functional scheme of FM adopted in operations was deliberately related to the needs of business strategy and the operations of the given shopping mall. A range of strategic choices for FM operations was also found. Certain choices are shared among the case studies, while their arrangements varied according to the particular business strategy and context.

Research limitations/implications

The number of case studies was rather limited, while the results were predominantly involved with a single type of facility.

Originality/value

The study identified the pattern of strategic choices entailed in the FM operations in shopping malls. The findings add to the understanding on FM strategy by widening the perspectives about the strategic choices of FM operations and how they are connected with the business strategy and operation model of retail estate. It adds empirical evidence and case studies regarding FM operations and its strategic features.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Sarich Chotipanich and Veerason Lertariyanun

The purpose of this paper is to investigate strategy adopted in facility management (FM) and to introduce a framework of studying FM strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate strategy adopted in facility management (FM) and to introduce a framework of studying FM strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research reported in this paper adopted case study approach. In total, five case studies of FM practices of leading banks in Thailand were chosen. The key data and information were collected by using semi‐structured interview method supplemented by relevant documents. This study examined the FM practices profile, scope and operational programs by using a literature‐based analytical framework of FM strategy content.

Findings

Four types of FM strategy were identified based on key value intent that FM attempts to deliver to its organisation: business value focused, workplace focused, facility performance focused and facility cost focused. Each strategy represents a particular domain focus of FM practice, determined to support the organisation's core operations. The paper discusses two levels of strategy concerning FM.

Research limitations/implications

The key findings of this research offer both practitioners and academic insights of FM strategies implemented in practices. However, the findings were derived from a rather small number of case studies and a certain industry.

Originality/value

The paper presents empirical evidence of FM strategy, which has been rare. To academics, it introduces a means and framework for FM strategy research.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Angie Houston and Gary Youngs

Examines the outsourced facilities management operations at the Rank Xerox Technical Centre ‐ the flagship European Research and Development Centre for the Document…

Abstract

Examines the outsourced facilities management operations at the Rank Xerox Technical Centre ‐ the flagship European Research and Development Centre for the Document Company, providing expertise in document processing to 129 countries worldwide. Demonstrates the proactive role taken by the FM company, CBX Ltd, in developing FM strategies and operations which support RX business objectives at this prestigious site. Details the parameters around which successful FM is implemented and measured. Provides performance indicators to assess the approach against benchmark levels in key FM categories.

Details

Facilities, vol. 14 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Boonkiat Wisittigars and Sununta Siengthai

This paper aims to identify crisis leadership competencies in the facility management (FM) sector in Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify crisis leadership competencies in the facility management (FM) sector in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

The Delphi technique was used in three rounds of opinion evaluation from 24 Thai FM experts, based on which a large-scale questionnaire survey instrument was developed and administered. Of the 350 questionnaires distributed, 290 usable questionnaires were obtained (82.85 per cent response rate). Factor analysis was used to reveal important leadership competencies for managing facilities in crisis situations.

Findings

The Delphi technique identified 32 potential FM crisis leadership competencies. Of these, principal component analysis revealed 29 significant competencies. These competencies were grouped, using factor loadings, into five different competencies: emergency preparedness; crisis communication; emotional intelligence; leadership skills; and problem-solving. Emergency preparedness was found to be the most important leadership competency in FM crisis management.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to the experiences of FM experts in Thailand. Its empirical results can help human resource managers to develop appropriate training programs and policies for FM practitioners, as well as to help junior FM practitioners develop competencies essential for leaders in the FM sector.

Originality/value

This is a novel empirical study of leadership competencies in a growing business sector in Thailand (FM) and possibly other countries in the Asian region. Leaders in FM can benefit from recognizing the leadership competencies that are critical during crisis management.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Per Anker Jensen

This paper aims to identify typical sourcing strategies and business models in facilities management (FM) and map archetypes of value chains with complementary sourcing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify typical sourcing strategies and business models in facilities management (FM) and map archetypes of value chains with complementary sourcing strategies and value chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on literature and case studies from previous research. Theoretically, the paper takes a generic value chain as a starting point together with the recent ISO standard on sourcing process and a business model framework. A conceptual framework is developed and typical sourcing strategies and business models for FM are investigated. Archetypical value chains are established by a combination of sourcing strategies and business models.

Findings

The paper identifies eight archetypes of FM value chains divided in three groups according to whether the core business organisation occupies rented facilities and owned facilities or has facilities operation as a core business like serviced office providers, etc.

Practical implications

The results can be used on a general level by everybody who need to get an overview and understanding of the complex structure of the FM sector. Furthermore, the results can help all parties involved in the FM value chain to get a clearer understanding of their position in the chain and help them develop their sourcing strategies and/or business model, depending on their type of organisation.

Originality/value

While there is a huge amount of literature on sourcing in FM, there has only been limited research on business models and value chains in FM. The paper is original in combining an investigation of sourcing strategies, business models and value chains in FM.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Agnieszka Zalejska-Jonsson

This paper aims to examine the strategy, selection and perception of facility management (FM) services and the effect it may have on perceived building quality.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the strategy, selection and perception of facility management (FM) services and the effect it may have on perceived building quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected through a survey distributed to board members of cooperatives for newly constructed buildings in Sweden. Responses from 394 cooperative boards were included in the data set and analysed. The difference in cooperative choice of FM strategy and satisfaction with FM services was examined with non-parametrical Kruskal–Wallis tests and the effect of FM strategy and satisfaction with FM services on perceived building quality was examined with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test.

Findings

The results suggest information asymmetry and indicate urgent need for an objective accreditation system for FM services, which will inform and assist housing owners in the FM selection process. The study validates the hypothesis that facilities management strategies applied by housing cooperatives have a significant effect on perception of building quality.

Practical implications

The findings will assist developers, facility and property managers to understand the needs and services valued by the housing cooperative. The findings highlight the information asymmetry, restricted techniques and weak signalling methods among FM services, and advocates promoting an objective accreditation system for FM services.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the discussion on the concept of building quality and the results presented provide a better understanding of facilities management strategy on perception of building quality.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Sarich Chotipanich and Bev Nutt

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be positioned and repositioned to meet the needs and expectations of an organisation, its staff and customers, as priorities shift and business circumstances change?

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were undertaken to investigate the precise nature and reasons for change to FM support arrangements, across a variety of organisational types and sectors. Data were collected through document searches, semi‐structured interviews, direct observations and supplementary questionnaires and follow‐up discussions. Field trials of this prototype framework were conducted to obtain expert opinions, comments, criticisms and suggestions for improvement, employing a methodology similar to that used in clinical trials for new medical procedures.

Findings

The main findings from the investigations cover the nature and purpose of change in FM and the key factors that were involved. A number of major opportunities for innovative developments in the facility management field were uncovered, together with five key areas for further research, through which to advance the role and remit of facility management generally.

Originality/value

The research here has produced a generic decision framework for positioning and repositioning FM support arrangements. This framework will enable facility managers to adopt a more secure approach for collecting essential information, identifying key issues and options, and should encourage a more rigorous and critical examination of alternative FM arrangements prior to implementation.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

M. Sarshar

The purpose of this paper is to describe a case study of SPICE FM implementation in the Facilities Directorate of a major UK hospital. SPICE FM is a process improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a case study of SPICE FM implementation in the Facilities Directorate of a major UK hospital. SPICE FM is a process improvement framework for FM organisations, which was developed through university research in the UK. SPICE FM identified strengths and weaknesses of the facilities operation and provides specific guidelines for organisational improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was limited to four areas of operations, namely: catering; estates; domestics and portering. A brief organisational strategy is developed, through document review, semi‐structured interviews and a small workshop. A vertical section of staff in the Facilities Directorate participated in the case study to determine the operational capabilities of the organisation. The staff ranged from Director of Facilities to line employees. The managers partook in semi‐structured interviews, while the employees participated in workshops.

Findings

The case study highlights some of the operational deficiencies in the organisation, such as health and safety management, and risk management. It identifies specifically how these processes can be improved, and which improvements are effectively linked to strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The paper only focuses on level 2 of the SPICE FM framework. Level 3 has not been researched yet. Also the SPICE FM approach must be linked to other major organisational development tools, such as EFQM, IIP and ISO.

Practical implications

A very useful approach in linking strategy with operational process improvements.

Originality/value

This case study puts the SPICE FM organisational learning framework in context. Previous papers have not reported on any major case studies, in order to demonstrates how the framework can be implemented.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

M.R. Baharum and M. Pitt

The purpose of this paper is to consider how a facilities management (FM) organisation can strategically manage its intellectual capital with regard to environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how a facilities management (FM) organisation can strategically manage its intellectual capital with regard to environmental management services and to suggest a conceptual strategy for determining FM intangible assets' competitiveness and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a literature review of published work within the industry in relation to environmental issues and FM knowledge management, forming a basis for a further research paradigm.

Findings

Building on the resource‐based view of the FM organisation, the FM intellectual capital framework is referred to emphasize the significance of green strategy in its knowledge components.

Research limitations/implications

This paper emphasizes the importance of FM intellectual capital in achieving overall sustainability and profitability to an organisation. However, due to limitations of experience within the FM knowledge perspective, it will take a while before significant results can be provided in proof of this.

Practical implications

This paper establishes an imperative approach about FM knowledge capital capability to drive a greater environmental effectiveness and to reduce liability from a pertinent environmental directive.

Originality/value

This paper theoretically evaluates the importance of FM intangible assets to the development of environmental management by an FM firm.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Huiying Hou and Hao Wu

Heritage building revitalisation (HBR) is gaining its popularity to intervene historic buildings/sites for their conservation and reuse. Given that multiple stake-holding…

Abstract

Purpose

Heritage building revitalisation (HBR) is gaining its popularity to intervene historic buildings/sites for their conservation and reuse. Given that multiple stake-holding situations are often involved in HBR process, coordination or managerial problem may hinder versatile facilities design for operational efficiency while preserving the heritage values. To address the coordination challenge, this paper aims to examine the relevance and relative advantages of a FM-led revitalisation strategy for HBR, which the existing literature has not yet addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a case study approach to a major HBR project in Hong Kong. This study conducted field observations and interviews, which were combined with publicly accessible policy and project information to identify stakeholders’ opinions and specifications for the role of facilities management (FM) in HBR project process.

Findings

The paper reveals the role of FM in coordinating the HBR process for the benefits of stakeholders and general community. FM allows a balanced approach to heritage building adaptation, sound user experience and broader community effects. This enables efficient decision-making, creative facilities design and effective public engagement. FM’s strength of fitting in the urban renewal context illustrates its comparative advantage for heritage conservation and revitalisation management.

Research limitations/implications

This study develops a conceptual map to identify FM’s role in heritage building conservation and revitalisation. This will enhance process evaluation and project decision-making that are central to heritage conservation policy and HBR intervention practices.

Originality/value

This study examines relevance and advantage of FM-led business strategy for HBR, which the existing literature has not yet addressed. It discovers FM’s strategic roles and initiates a conceptual framework for evaluation of heritage conservation management.

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