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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Liz Clark and David Rees

The authors refer to their research into the role of facilities management (FM) within the National Health Service and local government in England and Wales. They compare…

2290

Abstract

The authors refer to their research into the role of facilities management (FM) within the National Health Service and local government in England and Wales. They compare the levels of FM awareness within these public bodies, the ability of FM managers to influence the decision‐making process, the relationship between these factors and the delivery of effective facilities management services and the relative importance given to FM in recent Government guidelines on best value in these two public services. Based on the findings of five research projects the authors have conducted in both sectors it illustrates how FM is not just a business opportunity but a rapidly expanding function that is gaining status as an important profession that warrants a high status in the strategic make‐up of both NHS Trusts and local government authorities.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 10/11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Qi Zhou Moss

The purpose of this paper is to give a broad review of existing facilities management (FM) market research. It aims to identify the differences and commonalities of the…

1286

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give a broad review of existing facilities management (FM) market research. It aims to identify the differences and commonalities of the various market research reports, especially the different market definitions used and different methodologies to calculate the size of the market.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the author's collection of UK FM market publications and years of research in this field.

Findings

Surprisingly, none of the current reports use a robust market research methodology and thus this casts doubt on the estimated size of the market and other findings.

Research limitations/implications

This paper only reviews the reports that the author has collected. Therefore, these may not be the latest versions of the publications.

Practical implications

The paper calls for all FM market research agencies to collaborate, to work out a robust market research methodology that can stand up to scrutiny. It also proposes to conduct FM market research from the demand side of the market – to use completely different market segmentations.

Originality/value

This paper tries to warn general FM professionals on quoting market size – all estimates should be treated with discretion.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Andrew Green and If Price

A project conceived as finding expert common ground on the future evolution of facilities management (FM) revealed, instead, differing perceptions of the FM role rooted in…

Abstract

A project conceived as finding expert common ground on the future evolution of facilities management (FM) revealed, instead, differing perceptions of the FM role rooted in different backgrounds, mind‐sets, and cultures, and held by the business, property, and FM disciplines. We report it in the hope of starting the change process which will allow the changing facilities needs of businesses and clients to be met.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Bev Nutt

This paper looks at the practical opportunities for collaboration between facilities management (FM) practice and research. It provides a framework for mapping the basic…

2040

Abstract

This paper looks at the practical opportunities for collaboration between facilities management (FM) practice and research. It provides a framework for mapping the basic origins for innovation in FM and the territory for collaborative research, through which futures in FM may be explored.

Details

Facilities, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Kenneth Sullivan, Stephen W. Georgoulis and Brian Lines

The purpose of this paper is to verify pre‐existing perceptions of the facilities management (FM) industry through the collection of empirical evidence that establishes…

1071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify pre‐existing perceptions of the facilities management (FM) industry through the collection of empirical evidence that establishes the current state of the profession. Data collected will identify the major challenges facing the FM industry, and will be used in the development of proposed academic programs to address these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Two online surveys of facilities managers on the national and local scale were used to produce a quantifiable description of the profession and its deficiencies. These surveys also focused on obtaining data to aid in the development of formal academic programs to train future facilities managers and measured the willingness of industry representatives to support the proposed academic programs.

Findings

Results indicate that there is an insufficient number of facilities managers entering the field to account for the high rate of attrition that will occur in the next ten to 15 years. The main reason for the lack in new facilities managers is the severely limited number of formal academic programs that specifically educate students in FM.

Originality/value

Results of this paper are valuable in that they quantified the main challenges facing the profession as well as the willingness of the US FM industry to support and recruit from proposed undergraduate programs. Collected data are also used to develop a specific undergraduate curriculum to educate students in the core skills needed to become successful facilities managers.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2011

Thomas Madritsch and Matthias Ebinger

The purpose of this paper is to present a process capability assessment tool to identify process maturity levels in the “built environment management” disciplines in…

2304

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a process capability assessment tool to identify process maturity levels in the “built environment management” disciplines in various industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers investigated and evaluated current FM/RE management models and analysis tools and developed an assessment tool to measure Facility Management (FM) capability of an organization. The “Built Environment Management Model” (BEM2) is a process framework for FM/RE, which is extended into the “Built Environment Management Maturity Model” (BEM3) to measure FM/RE maturity. Using the tool, the research team analyzed the FM capability of more than 50 organizations with major real estate portfolios in the USA and Europe (primarily Austria).

Findings

BEM2 and BEM3 provide a simple, yet comprehensive tool set for the FM/RE industries. The resulting capability profiles provide a high‐level overview of current practices in FM. Further, the capability profiles allow organizations to benchmark their FM capability against peer groups and industry leaders.

Research limitations/implications

The two models are currently limited to a description of processes and are as such explaining the sequence and maturity of FM/RE business processes. The do not yet address the skill sets and capabilities required to effectively perform these functions. The integration with existing models in organisational and project management can also be further explored.

Practical implications

The capability profiles allow organizations to benchmark their FM capability against peer groups and industry leaders. The findings will help to further professionalize FM functions to raise the efficiency of organizational processes.

Originality/value

The proposed contributes to the discussion on standardization and taxonomy development in the FM/RE discipline. It draws principles from related management models and applies them successfully in FM and real estate management.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Sarich Chotipanich and Bev Nutt

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be…

3033

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a fundamental question that all facility directors and senior managers face. How should facility management support arrangements be positioned and repositioned to meet the needs and expectations of an organisation, its staff and customers, as priorities shift and business circumstances change?

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were undertaken to investigate the precise nature and reasons for change to FM support arrangements, across a variety of organisational types and sectors. Data were collected through document searches, semi‐structured interviews, direct observations and supplementary questionnaires and follow‐up discussions. Field trials of this prototype framework were conducted to obtain expert opinions, comments, criticisms and suggestions for improvement, employing a methodology similar to that used in clinical trials for new medical procedures.

Findings

The main findings from the investigations cover the nature and purpose of change in FM and the key factors that were involved. A number of major opportunities for innovative developments in the facility management field were uncovered, together with five key areas for further research, through which to advance the role and remit of facility management generally.

Originality/value

The research here has produced a generic decision framework for positioning and repositioning FM support arrangements. This framework will enable facility managers to adopt a more secure approach for collecting essential information, identifying key issues and options, and should encourage a more rigorous and critical examination of alternative FM arrangements prior to implementation.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Linda Tay and Joseph T.L. Ooi

Despite its rapid development in the last decade, facilities management (FM) stills suffers from an identity crisis as the definition and scope of FM remains a contentious…

7316

Abstract

Despite its rapid development in the last decade, facilities management (FM) stills suffers from an identity crisis as the definition and scope of FM remains a contentious issue. To this end, three fundamental issues are re‐examined in this paper: what FM constitutes; what a facility manager is; and how the FM profession can be enhanced. These issues remain critical as they represent the building blocks of the FM discipline. Without a common platform, the development of FM is likely to be fragmented. An evaluation of the definitions of FM provided in the past suggests that the focus of FM is clearly on the workplace. The key issues confronting FM are the location, type, quantity, quality, content and allocation of the workspace. A professional facilities manager is one who is formally trained and whose main responsibility is the strategic management of the workplace. Three factors are suggested to be important for the development of FM as a professional discipline. They include a clear role and scope of FM in the industry and firm, contribution to the bottom‐line of the firm, and development of specialist knowledge and toolbox for addressing the problems of strategic workplace management. Some potential areas for theoretical developments have been suggested in this paper.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2022

Oliver Tannor, Elvis Attakora-Amaniampong and Emmanuel Kanchebe Derbile

This study aims to assess the facilities management (FM) strategies used in multi-tenanted purpose-built office buildings (Mt-POBs) in Ghana and the drivers that influence…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the facilities management (FM) strategies used in multi-tenanted purpose-built office buildings (Mt-POBs) in Ghana and the drivers that influence the decision to use such strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted via a survey and key informant interviews. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire targeted at 65 multi-tenanted office building owners in the Greater Accra region. The data from the survey revealed the views of building owners on FM strategy and the extent to which 20 facility management decision drivers influenced their decisions to use a particular strategy and the responses were descriptively analysed. The key informant interviews were conducted among six leaders of the property owners’ association who use in-house FM to further understand their perspectives and decisions on using such strategy. The interviews were conducted over telephone using an interview guide and analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The results showed that 88% of Mt-POBs in Ghana are managed in-house. The results also showed that the decision to use the in-house strategy was driven by the innovative, strategic and cost-saving advantages associated with the in-house strategy.

Originality/value

This study shows the factors that drive the decision of multi-tenanted office building owners in Ghana to use the in-house strategy. The findings of this study will be useful for prospective owners of office buildings in Ghana.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2022

Justin R. Dodd, Jake Smithwick, Steven Call and Dipin Kasana

The purpose of this paper is to address the knowledge gap on the use of benchmarking techniques as utilized by facilities management (FM) professionals for the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the knowledge gap on the use of benchmarking techniques as utilized by facilities management (FM) professionals for the purpose of identifying means to improve industry benchmarking practices and guide the direction of future FM benchmarking research.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through surveying 585 FM practitioners representing various countries, organization sizes, types, industries. The data were summarized and analyzed through creating frequency tables, charts, and cross-tabulations. The survey results were compared to a previously published study on benchmarking use to identify the similarities and differences between benchmarking for FM functions vs core business functions.

Findings

The findings indicate that while FM-oriented benchmarking has been adopted at similar levels as other industries, FM-oriented benchmarking tends to be simplistic, lacks a strategic position in the company, often relies upon self-report survey data, is often performed by an individual with no formal benchmarking team and does not utilize process benchmarking or benchmarking networks. These findings emphasize the need for benchmarking education, advocacy for FM as a strategic business partner, the development of verified data sources and networks specifically for the unique greater facilities management field functions.

Practical implications

These findings provide needed data on the state of FM practitioner use of benchmarking specifically for FM functions in North America. The results can be used as an assessment for the industry, to improve practitioner use and knowledge, and to identify further avenues for academic study.

Originality/value

The value of this study lies in filling in identified knowledge gaps on how FM practitioners are using benchmarking in practice. These data are absent from the research literature and offer the potential to help bridge the academic-practitioner divide to ensure that future research will focus on addressing practitioner needs for the industry.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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