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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Kyle M.L. Jones and Amy VanScoy

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how instructors discuss student data and information privacy in their syllabi.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how instructors discuss student data and information privacy in their syllabi.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected a mixture of publicly accessible and privately disclosed syllabi from 8,302 library and information science (LIS) courses to extract privacy language. Using privacy concepts from the literature and emergent themes, the authors analyzed the corpus.

Findings

Most syllabi did not mention privacy (98 percent). Privacy tended to be mentioned in the context of digital tools, course communication, policies and assignments.

Research limitations/implications

The transferability of the findings is limited because they address only one field and professional discipline, LIS, and address syllabi for only online and hybrid courses.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a need for professional development for instructors related to student data privacy. The discussion provides recommendations for creating educational experiences that support syllabi development and constructive norming opportunities.

Social implications

Instructors may be making assumptions about the degree of privacy literacy among their students or not value student privacy. Each raises significant concerns if privacy is instrumental to intellectual freedom and processes critical to the educational experience.

Originality/value

In an age of educational data mining and analytics, this is one of the first studies to consider if and how instructors are addressing student data privacy in their courses, and the study initiates an important conversation for reflecting on privacy values and practices.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

H. Frank Cervone

Information professionals are increasing called upon to provide access and services for information that, by its nature, must be restricted to certain uses or classes of…

Abstract

Purpose

Information professionals are increasing called upon to provide access and services for information that, by its nature, must be restricted to certain uses or classes of individuals. This paper aims to explore the six major compliance regulations in the USA that information professionals should have a basic understanding of to manage a restricted information environment effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a general review of laws and requirements in the USA related to information security that may affect information professionals in their work.

Findings

The world of information security is complex and there are multiple laws, guidelines and standards that apply. For information professionals managing or deploying digital repositories or information archives, all of these need to be considered because plans and systems are being developed. Information professionals will increasingly be called upon to lend their expertise to emerging preservation problems related to restricted data, so understanding the basics of information security law is a requirement to successful information practice.

Originality/value

This is the first general overview of this area of information practice.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2017

Jo Teut

Purpose: In this chapter, I critically examine how federal regulation and guidance impact gender policing and transgender inclusion within educational institutions.…

Abstract

Purpose: In this chapter, I critically examine how federal regulation and guidance impact gender policing and transgender inclusion within educational institutions.

Approach: I utilize feminist critical discourse analysis to examine the “Dear Colleague Letter on Transgender Students” and its underlying assumptions related to transgender inclusion and gender policing in institutions of education.

Findings: While the federal regulations and guidance currently in place protect some transgender individuals, they also re-stigmatize some transgender individuals by policing the acceptable ways of being transgender and reinforcing the gender binary.

Social Implications: I suggest other areas within the educational institution to address in order to achieve transgender inclusion.

Value of Paper: This chapter critically examines the logistics and effects of federal regulation on gender and transgender inclusion.

Details

Gender Panic, Gender Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-203-1

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Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2011

Betty Y. Ashbaker

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life…

Abstract

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. (Declaration of Independence, 1776)

Details

History of Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-629-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Rose Sliger Krause, Andrea Langhurst Eickholt and Justin L. Otto

The purpose of this paper is to describe the music performance collection preserved in Eastern Washington University’s institutional repository (IR). This collection of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the music performance collection preserved in Eastern Washington University’s institutional repository (IR). This collection of recordings of student music performances is the result of an ongoing collaboration between the university?s library and music department, which serves to provide discoverability, preservation and access to a collection of student creative works, which had heretofore been a hidden collection.

Design/methodology/approach

This collection of student creative work was identified as a suitable project for the Eastern Washington University’s IR while it was still in the planning stages because it was identified as an existing need that the new IR could address. Much of the groundwork for the collaboration between the library and music department was completed prior to IR implementation. Thus, the library was ready to begin work on this collection once the IR was operational.

Findings

The student music performance collection has been a successful project for the IR, which benefits the music department by making student performances discoverable and accessible, and benefits the library by providing the opportunity to demonstrate that the then-new IR could support the university’s student-centered focus on teaching and learning.

Originality/value

While there is a growing body of literature on IRs emphasizing student work, there is little literature on music or other creative works’ collections in IRs, much less on creative works by students. This paper adds to the limited body of literature on student creative works in the IR by describing the development, implementation and lessons learned from the successful music performances collection.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Eileen Weisenbach Keller, Stephanie Hughes and Giles Hertz

An increase in the number of disruptive and violent events on college and university campuses instigated this review of the methods used to interrupt the trend, with the…

Abstract

Purpose

An increase in the number of disruptive and violent events on college and university campuses instigated this review of the methods used to interrupt the trend, with the goal of identifying a preliminary model for systematic management of such threats. The intent is to instigate research, review and discussion in order to decrease the number and severity of threatening incidents on college campuses.

Design/methodology/approach

Thorough review of plans from primary and secondary education, plans in use in higher education, literature on risk and threat assessment, literature on “whistle blowers”, and of violent events on college campuses was used to construct a model.

Findings

It was found that, in terms of managing and reducing threats to people who study, live and work in post‐secondary educational institutions, insufficient attention has been given to the unique needs of this setting and therefore efforts to mitigate threats have been insufficient. The investigation resulted in the development of a model of assessment and management of threats on university and college campuses.

Research limitations/implications

College campus threat assessment research is very much in its infancy and will certainly develop over time. This paper is the first step in an effort to develop and ultimately test the plausibility of a model. Future research should be pursued to determinewhether the model holds up under a majority of situations on college campuses. Those involved in threat mitigation in university settings should be queried to determine their agreement with the proposed framework and for assistance in refining it.

Originality/value

This paper presents suggestions for the systematic management of threats and mitigation in university settings.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Megan Schramm-Possinger, Lisa E. Johnson and Beth G. Costner

The United States (US) has accreditation agencies that assess higher education in a manner analogous to external examiners in the United Kingdom. An example accreditor…

Abstract

The United States (US) has accreditation agencies that assess higher education in a manner analogous to external examiners in the United Kingdom. An example accreditor, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, requires university-level Educator Preparation Program providers (EPPs) to evaluate the degree to which (a) their graduates feel prepared to assume their professional roles as a result of their EPP training and (b) their impacts on PK-12 students’ learning. These are meaningful forms of programmatic assessment, however, governmental agencies in the United States do not uniformly collect these data. This has required many EPP providers to do so, with unintended negative consequences. The authors use this context as a case study to examine what must be done when reporting guidelines do not align with the data available. Although a single example, readers are asked to consider analogous situations within their own contexts. Presented in this chapter is the accreditation landscape, a description of the challenges listed above, common solutions, and recommendations for greater coordination among stakeholders in order to expand the systematic conferral of data in safe, ethical, and meaningful ways.

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2007

John W. Hunt

One of the most challenging issues facing building level administrators is the supervision of special education programs in their schools. This chapter outlines the role…

Abstract

One of the most challenging issues facing building level administrators is the supervision of special education programs in their schools. This chapter outlines the role of the building administrator in overseeing the implementation of special education laws and policies from the initial process of referring students for special education services through the implementation and monitoring phases of service delivery at the building level. Detailed topics include dealing with parents, regular education staff, and student privacy issues. This text examines student discipline and due process complaints as well as strategies for dealing with outside agencies, such as child welfare departments and law enforcement officials. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the No Child Left Behind Act, and its impact on special education services at the building level.

Details

Teaching Leaders to Lead Teachers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1461-4

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Abstract

Details

Knowledge Economies and Knowledge Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-778-3

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Chad Laux, Na Li, Corey Seliger and John Springer

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for utilizing Six Sigma (SS) principles and Big Data analytics at a US public university for the improvement of student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for utilizing Six Sigma (SS) principles and Big Data analytics at a US public university for the improvement of student success. This research utilizes findings from the Gallup index to identify performance factors of higher education. The goal is to offer a reimagined SS DMAIC methodology that incorporates Big Data principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilize a conceptual research design methodology based upon theory building consisting of discovery, description, explanation of the disciplines of SS and Big Data.

Findings

The authors have found that the interdisciplinary approach to SS and Big Data may be grounded in a framework that reimagines the define, measure, analyze, improve and control (DMAIC) methodology that incorporates Big Data principles. The authors offer propositions of SS DMAIC to be theory tested in subsequent study and offer the practitioner managing the performance of higher education institutions (HEIs) indicators and examples for managing the student success mission of the organization.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to conceptual research design with regard to the SS and Big Data interdisciplinary research. For performance management, this study is limited to HEIs and non-FERPA student data. Implications of this study include a detailed framework for conducting SS Big Data projects.

Practical implications

Devising a more effective management approach for higher education needs to be based upon student success and performance indicators that accurately measure and support the higher education mission. A proactive approach should utilize the data rich environment being generated. The individual that is most successful in engaging and managing this effort will have the knowledge and skills that are found in both SS and Big Data.

Social implications

HEIs have historically been significant contributors to the development of meritocracy in democratic societies. Due to a variety of factors, HEIs, especially publicly funded institutions, have been under stress due to a reduction of public funding, resulting in more limited access to the public in which they serve.

Originality/value

This paper examines Big Data and SS in interdisciplinary effort, an important contribution to SS but lacking a conceptual foundation in the literature. Higher education, as an industry, lacks penetration and adoption of continuous improvement efforts, despite being under tremendous cost pressures and ripe for disruption.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 66 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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