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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Peter Jones and Daphne Comfort

The purpose of this review paper is to extend the literature on animal welfare in the hospitality industry by exploring how some of the major fast-food companies have…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this review paper is to extend the literature on animal welfare in the hospitality industry by exploring how some of the major fast-food companies have publicly addressed this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews, and reflects on, the animal welfare statements and policies posted on the Internet by five major fast-food companies, namely, Yum! Brands, Restaurant Brands International, McDonald's, Domino's Pizza Group and Subway.

Findings

The findings reveal that four interlinked themes, namely, strategic corporate commitment, a focus on supply chains, policies on specific categories of animals and food products, and auditing, illustrated the selected companies approach to animal welfare. The authors also raise a number of issues about the selected companies' approaches to animal welfare including the aspirational nature of their commitments, the emphasis on regular audits, the role of external assurance in the reporting process, the role of animal welfare pressure groups and campaigns, and the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Research limitations/implications

The paper's empirical material is drawn from the corporate websites of five fast-food companies, but the paper has theoretical and practical implications and provides a platform for future research.

Originality/value

The paper offers a simple review of the way five major fast-food companies have addressed the issue of animal welfare.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Simone Guercini and Andrea Runfola

This paper aims to deal with the issue of business model change in industrial markets. It considers the fast-fashion supply chain by addressing the following research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with the issue of business model change in industrial markets. It considers the fast-fashion supply chain by addressing the following research questions: What are the paths of change of the supplier’s business model to match the business model of fast fashion customers? How can a supplier’s business model be adapted to customer’s requirements in these paths of change?

Design/methodology/approach

Empirically, the paper presents a multiple case study of 10 semi-finished textile suppliers, carried out through a long-term research programme in the Italian textile industrial district of Prato.

Findings

The multiple-case study shows some key drivers of change in the suppliers’ business models. Three main paths emerged from the interactions with fast fashion clients. Paradoxes in the supplier’s business model changes are identified and discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The paper proposes implications for suppliers interacting with fast fashion clients and discusses how the adaptation of business models may be interpreted. This study points out how matching the business model of the customers does not call for alignment of similar features.

Originality/value

The paper deals with an understudied topic within the literature: business models change in business to business markets, taking into consideration the perspective of the supplier. It considers buyers-seller relationships in industrial supply chains as being part of a chain of business models and the need for the supplier’s business model to adapt and match one of the clients. The paper proposes two potential interpretations of such adaptation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Wardah Mohd Yasin, Muhammad Muzaffar Ali Khan Khattak, Nik Mazlan Mamat and Wan Azdie Mohd Abu Bakar

The purpose of this article is to assess the effect of religious fasting on the cognitive performance during the month of Ramadan among healthy fasting individuals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to assess the effect of religious fasting on the cognitive performance during the month of Ramadan among healthy fasting individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

30 students were recruited prior the month of Ramadan to compare their cognitive performance during and after fasting. The data on cognition score were collected in two phases during and after Ramadan on four occasions (two times in Ramadan and two times after Ramadan) using structured questionnaire. The level of cognition was assessed by using two approaches: mathematical problem solving and memory testing. Five questions of mathematical problem were given to the subjects and were different at each week. However, the level of difficulty was kept constant. The time and score were recorded for each respondent during and after fasting month. For the memory test, ten pictures of items of similar sizes were displayed for 30 seconds, and the subjects were asked to recall/list down the item shown in the pictures. The cognition scores were expressed as mean±SD, and repeated measures analysis test was used for differences in fasting and non‐fasting days.

Findings

As expected, during Ramadan meal frequency was lower and sleeping (nap) frequency was higher with shorter duration at night. The feeling of tiredness was higher compared to non‐fasting days. The level of cognition score for was not different during Ramadan compared to non‐fasting days. The result shows that the level of cognition is not affected in fasting.

Originality/value

The research shows that the cognition is not affected in Ramadan fasting.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Futoshi Kobayashi

Although several anthropologists have reported various cultural differences between East Asians and Americans regarding their usage of fast food based on their…

Abstract

Purpose

Although several anthropologists have reported various cultural differences between East Asians and Americans regarding their usage of fast food based on their ethnographic fieldwork, a quantitative study to test the validity of such findings is necessary for advancement of this research field. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively investigate cultural differences and similarities between American and Japanese college students regarding the usage and meaning of fast food.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 130 Japanese college students (82 female and 48 male) in Miyazaki, Japan and 70 American college students (43 female and 27 male) in Maine, USA answered the survey in order to assess their conceptualization and usage of fast food.

Findings

The results indicated that: both Americans and Japanese assumed that fast food was a meal instead of a snack, Japanese and women in general were more likely to visit fast food restaurants with others instead of going alone than Americans and men in general, and Japanese were more likely to share their ordered fast food items with others and stay at fast food restaurants for a longer duration than Americans.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the limited sample size, the results of the present study might be strengthened with further investigation of different samples.

Practical implications

Like qualitative studies conducted before, the results of this quantitative study provided evidence to suggest that there are cultural differences in the meaning and usage of fast food between East Asians and Americans.

Originality/value

There were few quantitative studies on cultural differences in the meaning and usage of fast food between East Asians and Americans. The present study might be the first such study.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Ali Kara, Erdener Kaynak and Orsay Kucukemiroglu

In recent years, a major food consumption trend in the USA andCanada is that more people are eating more meals outside their homes. Itis predicted that this trend will…

Abstract

In recent years, a major food consumption trend in the USA and Canada is that more people are eating more meals outside their homes. It is predicted that this trend will accelerate in the future. As a result, fast‐food markets will offer greater growth opportunities for marketers. Presents consumers′ perceptions of and preferences for fast‐food restaurants in the USA and Canada. The results of this study may have very important implications for developing successful marketing strategies for fast‐food restaurants. Findings of the study offer need‐oriented marketing strategies for both franchisers and franchisees in the US and Canadian fast‐food sectors to enable them to be more competitive in this fast‐changing business environment.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Neale J. Slack, Gurmeet Singh, Jazbeen Ali, Reshma Lata, Karishma Mudaliar and Yogita Swamy

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of fast-food restaurant service quality (compound effect of food quality, physical environment quality and employee…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of fast-food restaurant service quality (compound effect of food quality, physical environment quality and employee service quality) and its dimensions (when acting independently) on customer perceived value, satisfaction and behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 400 fast-food restaurant customers in Fiji using a public-intercept survey. The study used descriptive and inferential analysis. This research also used backward elimination multiple regressions to test the hypotheses of this study.

Findings

The compound effect of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions on customer perceived value revealed food quality and physical environment quality are significant determinants of customer perceived value, however employee service quality is not. In contrast, the effect of the fast-food service quality dimensions acting independently on customer perceived value revealed the three dimensions are significant determinants of customer perceived value. Results also confirmed that customer perceived value is a significant determinant of customer satisfaction and customer satisfaction is a significant determinant of behavioural intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights to fast-food restaurateurs and marketers the importance of determining the compound effect of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions, delivering the right combination of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions to customers and not singling out dimensions in an attempt to enhance restaurant service quality.

Originality/value

This study makes important contributions towards understanding the compound effect of fast-food restaurant service quality dimensions and the independent effect of these dimensions on the formation of customer perceived value, customer satisfaction and behavioural intentions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2012

Adam Clemens

Some positions within a firm consistently lead to promotion with a higher probability than other positions at the same hierarchical level. Therefore, serial correlation of…

Abstract

Some positions within a firm consistently lead to promotion with a higher probability than other positions at the same hierarchical level. Therefore, serial correlation of promotion rates is not indicative merely of individuals with high innate ability, but it is also a feature of organizational structure. I describe these positions as “fast jobs” and present a model in which jobholders acquire human capital in these jobs that is more valuable at the next level. Data from a financial services firm confirm that workers in fast jobs are younger than other workers at the same level, and that transfers from fast to slow jobs are common. Thus, the process of grooming workers for advancement is analogous to more aggressive up-or-out systems. This deliberate grooming of some workers for advancement has income inequality implications, as it may reinforce the effect of small biases or small differences in early apparent ability.

Details

Research in Labor Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-358-2

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Ruihua Joy Jiang, Jie Xiong, Yuan Ding and Ravi Parameswaran

How to enter and expand in a newly emerged foreign market is less understood. Should multinational enterprises move fast or slowly? In this study, the authors take China…

Abstract

Purpose

How to enter and expand in a newly emerged foreign market is less understood. Should multinational enterprises move fast or slowly? In this study, the authors take China as the context to investigate what factors will lead to a fast expansion strategy in a foreign market. The purpose of this paper is to understand whether fast expansion benefits firms’ performance in a rapidly emerging market.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on insights from field interviews, the authors developed a theoretical framework. Then, the authors collected data from surveys of managers of multinational enterprises from Western countries to test their hypothesis. This research context is based on the experience of multinational enterprises in China which opened up to foreign direct investment in 1979.

Findings

This study shows that internally, strategic long-term investment goals, top management team commitment and externally switching costs and the growth in the demand market which will push firms to expand fast in the newly emerged China market. Faster pace of expansion benefits the performance of multinational enterprises in a newly emerged market.

Originality/value

Based on the onsite interviews followed by the survey of top managers of multinational enterprises located in China, this study provides a fine-grained analysis of the importance of pace and its key antecedents. Thus, the results provide new insights to decision-makers of multinational enterprises when considering expanding in an emerging market at its early stages of growth.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Tara Stringer, Gary Mortimer and Alice Ruth Payne

The rise of fast fashion has changed the face of global fashion. Despite sector growth, critics have questioned the level of obsolescence, encouragement of…

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of fast fashion has changed the face of global fashion. Despite sector growth, critics have questioned the level of obsolescence, encouragement of over-consumption and fast fashion's unsustainable business practices. Specifically, mounting concerns surround the impact on environmental, worker and animal welfare. Accordingly, the aim of this current work is to understand the influence of consumer's values on ethical consumption in a fast-fashion context.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was designed to collect responses relating to personal values and ethical concerns towards animal and worker welfare issues, as well as environmental concerns. A total of 350 US-based fast-fashion consumers completed the survey via Amazon MTurk. Factor analyses and structural equation modelling were used to analyse and test a theoretically hypothesised model.

Findings

This study found that self-transcendence values and openness to change values have a positive impact on consumers' levels of ethical concern towards animal welfare, the environment and worker welfare concerns within the fashion industry. Furthermore, a consumer's level of concern towards animal welfare and the environment positively influences a consumer's likeliness to purchase ethically marketed fast fashion.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the role of consumer values and their influence on ethical concerns within the fashion industry and the impact of these concerns on intentions to purchase ethically marketed fast fashion. Responding to calls for further research into ethical consumption of apparel, this study includes all elements of ethical consumption identified, including animal welfare. This study identifies ethical areas of concern salient amongst fast-fashion consumers and provides a deeper understanding of the values impacting the level of ethical concerns surrounding animal welfare, the environment and worker welfare.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Lucas Ramos Camargo, Susana Carla Farias Pereira and Marcia Regina Santiago Scarpin

The aim of this study is to identify and analyse the main strategic differences between fast and ultra-fast fashion supply chain management.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to identify and analyse the main strategic differences between fast and ultra-fast fashion supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative approach, using document analysis and in-depth interviews with industry specialists.

Findings

Ultra-fast fashion differs from fast in the following supply chain strategies: avoids any excess inventory, focuses on local manufacturing, on-demand production, and shorter lead times from a few days to a week with a combination of agile, lean, responsive supply chain strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research are due to the cut-off period and the use of a restricted sample. As implications, technological capabilities are underexplored in the fashion industry. Although important to the traditional and fast fashion industry, technology is viewed as a tool and not as a capability that can generate competitive advantage. This paper addresses technology as capabilities to make ultra-fast fashion retailers more competitive.

Practical implications

Ultra-fast fashion could potentially impact current fast fashion retailers to partially move their business model and operations towards an ultra-fast approach. Fast fashion retailers desiring to speed up their production processes launch more weekly collections to cater to consumers who are more fashion-conscious.

Originality/value

There is a rapid emergence of new start-ups that are calling themselves ultra-fast. Newcomers wanting to adopt this new segment’s business model, develop technological capabilities to meet the challenges of this supercompetitive market.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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