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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

F.W. Dulle, M.J.F. Lwehabura, R.T. Mulimila and D.S. Matovelo

This paper reports results based on a study aimed at assessing the capability of agricultural libraries in meeting researchers’ information needs, finding out means used…

Abstract

This paper reports results based on a study aimed at assessing the capability of agricultural libraries in meeting researchers’ information needs, finding out means used by researchers to cope with the scarcity of scientific information, and based on study findings, give some recommendations on how to improve agricultural library services in Tanzania.

Details

Library Review, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

F.W. Dulle, M.J.F. Lwehabura, D.S. Matovelo and R.T. Mulimila

The major objective of this study was to analyse the citation patterns of agricultural scientists in Tanzania. The specific objectives were to: assess researchers’ access…

Abstract

The major objective of this study was to analyse the citation patterns of agricultural scientists in Tanzania. The specific objectives were to: assess researchers’ access to information as reflected from citation analysis; establish a list of core agricultural journals for agricultural researchers in Tanzania using citation analysis and user opinions; and find out the extent to which the available information resources meet the research needs revealed by the study. The study involved the analysis of 295 MSc theses and 21 PhD theses submitted at Sokoine University of Agriculture between 1989‐1999, and 309 conference proceeding articles published during the same period. It is concluded that generally agricultural scientists in the country had limited access to current journals. A number of options are recommended to alleviate the situation, with a focus on electronic journal provision supported by international organisations.

Details

Library Review, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2014

Alfred Said Sife and Edda Tandi Lwoga

The purpose of this scientometric study was to conduct an analysis of the research productivity and scholarly impact of academic librarians in Tanzania for a period of 30…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this scientometric study was to conduct an analysis of the research productivity and scholarly impact of academic librarians in Tanzania for a period of 30 years from 1984 to 2013.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained using the Publish or Perish software which uses Google Scholar to retrieve scholars’ publications, citations and related metrics. For each librarian, the retrieved metrics were the number of papers, papers per author, citation counts, average citations per paper, average papers per author, average citations per year, average citations per author and four indices, namely, the h-index, g-index, Hc-index and the HI-norm.

Findings

The study findings indicate that 434 publications were recorded for all librarians, giving an average of 14.5 publications per year. The year 2008 had the most (9.9 per cent) publications followed by 2010 (7.8 per cent), while the years 1985 and 1987 had the lowest (0.2 per cent) number of publications. About 43 per cent of the publications were single-authored and the degree of collaboration was 0.57. The top-ten ranked librarians contributed more than half (53.2 per cent) of all publications, although they showed considerable variation among different metrics. Only three journal articles had 25 or more citations.

Originality/value

Previous studies on the topic are scarce, and, therefore, this paper provides useful recommendations to library and information science (LIS) schools, libraries and universities to improve research productivity of their academic librarians in Tanzania and other countries with a similar setting.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Lars Moksness and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to understand how attitudes, norms (injunctive and descriptive) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) (capacity and autonomy) influence the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how attitudes, norms (injunctive and descriptive) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) (capacity and autonomy) influence the intention to publish open access (OA), and how personal innovativeness in information technology affects attitude and PBC.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an integrated and extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework within a cross-sectional survey design. The sample consists of researchers at a Norwegian university, and data are collected digitally via e-mail invitation and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study determines that attitude is the strongest predictor of the intention to publish OA, followed by injunctive and descriptive social norms, and PBC capacity and autonomy. All factors positively influence intention apart from PBC autonomy, which has a negative effect.

Research limitations/implications

Potential limitations include: a relatively small sample size, self-reported data and employing intention, not behavior, as the ultimate dependent variable.

Practical implications

This research contributes with a deeper understanding of what drives the intention to publish OA research articles, and how innovativeness affects attitudes and PBC autonomy. Support is found for an extended TPB model with decomposed normative and PBC components. This knowledge is essential in creating an impetus for systematic research on OA publishing behavior.

Originality/value

Theory-driven research into understanding OA publishing behavior is rare. Decomposing the normative and PBC constructs is uncommon in TPB research, and a novel approach in OA research. Personal innovativeness has not been explored previously in relation to OA publishing.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Ronald Benard, Frankwell Dulle and Hieromin Lamtane

This paper aims to examine the challenges facing fish farmers in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in information sharing on fish farming.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the challenges facing fish farmers in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in information sharing on fish farming.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used both quantitative and qualitative methods. It involved 240 fish farmers who were randomly selected. Questionnaires, focus group discussions (FGDs), observation and key informant’s interviews were used as methods of data collection. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse quantitative data, while content analysis was used for qualitative data.

Findings

It was found that the most frequently used ICTs by fish farmers in sharing agricultural information were mobile phones, radio and television. Also, the study revealed that major challenges facing fish farmers in sharing information include unfavourable radio or television broadcasting time, high cost of acquiring and maintenance of ICT facilities, lack of training on ICT, poor network connectivity and low level of literacy. Moreover, it was further found that there was negative significant relationship (P < 0.05) between challenges associated with the use and degree of ICT usage by fish farmers.

Originality/value

The study is original with the exception of areas where citations have been made. Besides, it provides awareness and understanding of the challenges facing fish farmers in ICT usage in information sharing on fish farming, and this will enable improvement of timely provision and access to relevant information and hence improved fish farming production.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Eli Fianu, Craig Blewett and George Oppong Ampong

The study seeks to investigate the factors that influence MOOC usage by students in tertiary institutes in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study seeks to investigate the factors that influence MOOC usage by students in tertiary institutes in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

As this study sought both to test existing UTAUT variables and potentially identify additional variables impacting MOOC usage, a mixed method approach was used. The quantitative study was used to test the significance of UTAUT variables on MOOC usage while the qualitative study was conducted to validate the quantitative results and potentially determine additional factors impacting MOOC usage.

Findings

The results of the quantitative data analysis showed that computer self-efficacy, performance expectancy and system quality had a significant influence on MOOC usage intention. Facilitating conditions, instructional quality and MOOC usage intention were found to have a significant influence on actual MOOC usage. The results of the qualitative data analysis showed that information-seeking behaviour and functional Internet access were dominant non-UTAUT factors that influence actual MOOC usage, while teacher motivation was a dominant non-UTAUT factor that influenced MOOC usage intention.

Research limitations/implications

The study employed a non-probability sampling technique which imposes limitations on the generalizability of the findings. Additionally, the study was conducted in two out of the ten geographical and administration regions of Ghana; this also imposes limitations on the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

It is important that lecturers and university management find ways of motivating students to participate in MOOCs. Lecturers can influence students to use MOOCs if they regularly and persistently spur the students on to use MOOCs. Lecturers can also adopt other innovative strategies such as posting MOOC information on student noticeboards, the formation of MOOC clubs and the commissioning of MOOC champions on campuses.

Social implications

The significance of functional Internet access in MOOC usage implies that good Internet connectivity is critical for online learning in developing countries. Regulators of Internet service providers must enforce strict adherence to quality of service standards regarding the provision of Internet service. The Internet service pricing regime must favour the use of the Internet for learning purposes.

Originality/value

The study adopted a mixed method approach to explore MOOC usage in a West African university context. The non-significance of two key UTAUT variables (effort expectancy and social influence) points to a key difference between the application of adoption and usage models to information systems compared to e-learning systems. Additionally, three other variables, namely information-seeking behaviour, functional Internet access and teacher motivation, were found to impact MOOC usage. The study presents a model of MOOC usage (MMU).

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Robert Detmering and Jessica English

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Information is provided about each source, and the paper discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Lars Moksness, Svein Ottar Olsen and Ho Huy Tuu

This study aims to explore the role of habit strength in explaining intention and open access (OA) and non-OA scholarly publishing.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of habit strength in explaining intention and open access (OA) and non-OA scholarly publishing.

Design/methodology/approach

A decomposed theory of planned behaviour (TPB) is used as the conceptual framework to investigate a sample of 1,588 researchers from the major universities in Norway. Different latent construct models are analysed with a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

The results show that the effect of habit was non-significant in an extended TPB framework where attitude was most important, followed by norms and perceived behavioural control in explaining intention to submit OA. Habit was only found to have a significant impact on intention to submit OA when it played a role as a full mediator for the effects of the intentional antecedents. In this modified model, norms were found to have a stronger effect than attitudes in explaining the habit to submit OA. OA habit strength forms intentions to publish in OA journals and reduces the intention to publish and publishing behaviour in NOA journals.

Research limitations/implications

Other individual forces (e.g. personality and personal values) and the role of habit strength should be included for future research.

Practical implications

The results provide empirical insights to management, policy makers and research on scholarly publishing.

Originality/value

This paper contributes not only to the understanding of OA scholarly publishing, but is also relevant for research on what drives (academic) data sharing, knowledge sharing, the sharing economy or the open source movement.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2018

Ester Ernest Mnzava and Mussa Ndambile Chirwa

This study aims to investigate the use of Sokoine University of Agriculture Institutional Repository (SUAIR) among academic staff at the College of Veterinary Medicine and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the use of Sokoine University of Agriculture Institutional Repository (SUAIR) among academic staff at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Science (CVBMS). Specifically, the study looked at awareness of, attitude, self-archiving and challenges the academic staff face when using SUAIR.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used survey method. The data were collected using self-administered questionnaire with the results analysed using descriptive statistics.

Findings

The study found that although there was more than one source of raising awareness on SUAIR, the university’s library, the internet and meetings were the major sources. Majority of the respondents were not aware of how to deposit their scholarly output in the institutional repository. As a result, the majority of academic staff had never deposited their scholarly work in SUAIR. Generally, the respondents had a positive attitude towards using SUAIR. Apart from lack of skills and knowledge on how to deposit research outputs, the study established that lack of time, fear of plagiarism and lack of awareness of existence of the SUAIR were significant barriers to the effective utilisation of SUAIR.

Originality/value

This is the first time such a study has been undertaken focussing on the use, awareness and attitude of SUAIR in Tanzania. As such, the study findings can be used to assess the attitude of academic staff at Sokoine University of Agriculture and other universities in Tanzania and Sub-Saharan Africa with similar operational characteristics.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 67 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

1 – 10 of 47