Search results

1 – 10 of 159
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Efthimia Pantzartzis, Andrew Price and Francis Edum Fotwe

Health and social care facilities are usually complex buildings that require continuous effort to provide resilient and sustainable responses to changes in demographics…

Abstract

Purpose

Health and social care facilities are usually complex buildings that require continuous effort to provide resilient and sustainable responses to changes in demographics, technologies, diseases and models of care. Despite resilience and sustainability concepts being frequently used by practitioners and researchers, ambiguities in their definitions often result in a lack of operational solutions to record, monitor and improve the resilience and sustainability of health and social care facilities. Although the importance and complexity of the issues are widely acknowledged, there is little strategic guidance as to how they should be achieved. The purpose of this paper is to assess the suitability of developing a roadmap for improving the resilience and sustainability of UK health and social care facilities, and to identify the layers and processes needed to construct such a roadmap.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted, starting with a literature review of different types of roadmaps and their suitability to support the desired improvement objectives. Layers and processes were thus developed using the key issues identified in three recent research streams, and the roadmap was structured.

Findings

The major findings have been captured within a three-layer, four-step process generic roadmap for improving the resilience and sustainability of health and social care facilities that can be used to monitor performance, plans future actions and implement response to change.

Practical implications

This paper targets decision makers, especially estate managers, but the proposed layers and processes can be modified for other stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper suggests an original approach for the development of a roadmap for resilience and sustainability of health and social care facilities, and specifically of how to structure layers and processes, envisioning a more integrated development of service provision and infrastructure asset management.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Isao T Matsumoto, John Stapleton, Jacqueline Glass and Tony Thorpe

As we move into a knowledge economy, employee skills are fast becoming an organization’s most valuable asset. Fundamental to successfully completing the complex range of…

Abstract

As we move into a knowledge economy, employee skills are fast becoming an organization’s most valuable asset. Fundamental to successfully completing the complex range of tasks presented by construction projects is bringing together individuals with the correct balance of skills. No one individual has the complete set of skills to do everything themselves, which makes the team only as strong as its weakest link. Sponsored by a leading UK‐based engineering design consultancy, a specification for a technologically driven skills management system was developed. It allowed the organization, its teams and the employees, to better measure, manage and develop their skill capabilities effectively. Key issues addressed by the paper include how skill ability can be measured, how skills can be structured, and how these measurements and structure can be combined to generate skills reports. The development of a prototype application, based on the above mentioned specification, tested the validity of the specification, and demonstrated to the sponsor the benefits that can be achieved by a systematic and practical approach to capturing, reviewing, planning and managing employee skills. It also highlighted the important business rationale for using such systems.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Andrew Powl and Martin Skitmore

It has been said that the effective performance of the Project Manager (PM) is the single most critical factor affecting successful project outcomes. Little is known…

Abstract

It has been said that the effective performance of the Project Manager (PM) is the single most critical factor affecting successful project outcomes. Little is known, however, of the nature and extent of the hindrances to PM effectiveness in the Construction Industry (CI). This paper reports on the results of a worldwide survey of PMs concerning these issues and shows that they have the potential to be more effective and more productive in their working. Associated with this is a need to be more aware of progress and developments in the CI generally, more aware of progress and developments in their own organization, more delegation of contract administration tasks and more general administrative support. Also highlighted is the lengthy working hours of PMs.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

F.T. Edum‐Fotwe, A.G.F. Gibb and M. Benford‐Miller

The concepts underlying innovation and standardisation presents an apparent divergence in what each strives to achieve. In the view of the authors, this has contributed in…

Abstract

The concepts underlying innovation and standardisation presents an apparent divergence in what each strives to achieve. In the view of the authors, this has contributed in no small measure to the low take‐up of standardisation within the construction sector as organisations strive to be innovative to improve on their performance and attain continuous improvement in their processes and operations as well as design solutions. The paper presents as a case, how one major public sector outfit is striving to achieve innovation within an agenda that involves a widespread adoption of standardisation. It presents the motivations for adopting an organisation‐wide agenda on innovation and standardisation, identifies the elements of apparent incongruity between the concepts, and outlines how the case organisation has resolved the divergences.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Long D. Nguyen, Long Le-Hoai, Dai Q. Tran, Chau N. Dang and Chau V. Nguyen

Managing complex construction projects is a challenging task because it involves multiple factors and decision-making processes. A systematic evaluation of these complex…

Abstract

Managing complex construction projects is a challenging task because it involves multiple factors and decision-making processes. A systematic evaluation of these complex factors is imperative for achieving project success. As most of these factors are qualitative or intangible in nature, decision makers often rely on subjective judgements when comparing and evaluating them. The hybrid techniques that integrate fuzzy set theory and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) are able to deal with such problems. This chapter discusses various hybrid techniques of the fuzzy AHP and presents an application of these techniques to the evaluation of transportation project complexity, which is essential for prioritising resource allocation and assessing project performance. Project complexity can be quantified and visualised effectively with the application of the fuzzy AHP. This chapter enhances the understanding of construction project complexity and fuzzy hybrid computing in construction engineering and management. Future research should address the calibration of fuzzy membership functions in pairwise comparisons for each individual decision maker and develop computational tools for solving optimisation problems in the constrained fuzzy AHP. In the area of construction project complexity, future research should investigate how scarce resources are allocated to better manage complex projects and how appropriate resource allocation improves their performance.

Details

Fuzzy Hybrid Computing in Construction Engineering and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-868-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

JOHN E. TOOKEY, MICHAEL MURRAY, CLIFF HARDCASTLE and DAVID LANGFORD

Today there are a number of different types of procurement routes available for clients to choose from. Each different type of procurement (traditional, design and build…

Abstract

Today there are a number of different types of procurement routes available for clients to choose from. Each different type of procurement (traditional, design and build, management, etc.) has its own proponents and inherent strengths and weaknesses. Selection of optimal procurement systems is difficult, because even experienced clients cannot know all the potential benefits or risks for each system. Procurement is, therefore, a succession of ‘calculated risks’. Industry and academia have focussed research on reducing procurement risk through better procurement‐system selection methods. Current research considers procurement as a set of rationalistic decisions within a closed environment, aiming to produce generic, prescriptive rules for clients and advisers to use to select the ‘best’ procurement route for their project. This paper seeks to identify whether prescriptive procurement guidance was adhered to on a set of case study projects. It was found that clients usually selected appropriate procurement systems, and where an inappropriate system was selected, alterations were made in contract form to incorporate aspects of the ‘best’ procurement route.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Marit Støre-Valen

This paper aims to gain insight in how the involvement of facilities management (FM) and clinical employees are practiced in new Norwegian hospital projects and to study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to gain insight in how the involvement of facilities management (FM) and clinical employees are practiced in new Norwegian hospital projects and to study the benefits and lessons learned from the involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is conducted by cross-sectional case studies of eight hospital projects by using a literature review, interviews and document studies of FM and clinical employees and project leaders (PLs) among Sykehusbygg.

Findings

The service design approach with a structured interaction between the PL’s of Sykehusbygg, and the different disciplines of clinical employees and FM specialist was rewarding and efficient. The facilitator role of Sykehusbygg is essential to manage such a broad and complex involvement process using a wide range of various techniques at the different stages of the projects (dialogue meetings, review meetings, workshops, post-it notes, 2-D drawings, mock-up and 3-D models, as well as virtual reality (VR) and Building Information Modeling technology). The clinical employees’ framework is stronger and much more structured than the involvement of FM competences through the different stages of the projects. The property management competences were involved at the early concept phase and design phase, whereas the Operation and Maintenance (O&M) competences were getting involved through the construction and commissioning phase. The value of FM involvement in all stages of the project is seen beneficial, particularly when the FM specialist become a part of the design team and located physically at the same place. The main reported benefits of early FM involvement are cost-effective technical solutions and installations, less design flaws and improved functionality, as well as a stronger ownership and mutual respect between the clinical and FM disciplines. However, not all hospital organizations see the benefits of the FM involvement of all stages, as they are driven by reducing capital cost. In one of the new projects, other ways of involving the FM competences were tested. Additionally, particularly for the O&M competences, a dialogue meeting with a clear focus of sharing experiences with different technical solution was found rewarding in terms of cost benefits.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not consider the social impact of the choices made in the design phase. The findings also indicated a certain development of the FM involvement. This is not studied in two of the newest projects where they are still in the design phase and the FM role was not interviewed.

Practical implications

The PL role is important as a facilitator role of the involvement process.

Social implications

A dialogue meeting with a group of O&M people was found rewarding and valuable for knowledge sharing. This methodology can be further developed and tested, as this group of stakeholders is not always available for giving input in the project.

Originality/value

The value of this study is the description of the interaction between the PLs and the hospital organization in the eight projects and lessons learned by the involvement of FM competences and clinical employees.

Details

Facilities , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Florence Yean Yng Ling, Francis Tekyi Edum‐Fotwe and Moxham Thor Huat Ng

The purpose of this paper is to present an investigation of facilities management (FM) needs of warehouse tenants to inform future warehouse design.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an investigation of facilities management (FM) needs of warehouse tenants to inform future warehouse design.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines FM needs that must be designed into warehouse projects. It identifies tenants' FM requirements in warehouses; investigates the relationship between tenant satisfaction and performance of different facilities in warehouses; and recommends design and FM practices that warehouse owners should adopt to give tenants value for money. The research involves a quantitative study of tenant requirements for using warehouses. A questionnaire survey was conducted on tenants to find out their important requirements with a structured instrument. The sample was tenants of warehouses in Singapore.

Findings

The results reveal that users' main needs and priority in warehouse operation comprise: incorporating an operations office within warehouses; providing an air well along the loading/unloading bays; ensuring no interruption of electricity supply; providing air‐conditioning to the office; and providing good housekeeping.

Originality/value

The paper provides information that can be the foundation for developing a set of generic tenant FM requirements that could accelerate the design development of warehouses.

Details

Facilities, vol. 26 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Mohammed Fadhil Dulaimi

The construction industry has been criticized, in many countries around the world, for not keeping pace with developments in the rest of the economy. One of the key issues…

Abstract

The construction industry has been criticized, in many countries around the world, for not keeping pace with developments in the rest of the economy. One of the key issues the construction industry needs to address is how to become “customer oriented”. This paper argues that the concept of customer orientation in construction has been influenced by the passive approach to product definition adopted by professional advisors and consultants. The paper will examine the current knowledge of the customer orientation concept and present a research model that can be used to examine the effectiveness of current practices in providing satisfactory products and services to customers. The paper will report the results of an investigation into the effectiveness of existing methods, practices and philosophies deployed by organizations involved in construction in identifying customer needs.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Samantha Price, Michael Pitt and Matthew Tucker

The paper aims to look at the prevalence of facilities management (FM) companies having in place a sustainability policy, and to understand the link between a…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to look at the prevalence of facilities management (FM) companies having in place a sustainability policy, and to understand the link between a sustainability policy, company characteristics, and the application of sustainable business practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method was a data analysis of 65 facilities management companies. Frequency analyses, multiple correspondence analyses and Pearson's χ2 tests were used to test the link between the company size, the presence of a sustainability policy and the implementation of sustainable business practice.

Findings

There is a link between company size and the likelihood of a sustainability policy being created in the FM industry. The research shows there is a link between the presence of a sustainability policy and the implementation of sustainable business practice.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the method of data capture, there are no perception research areas, so the reasons behind companies' actions are not known. This can be developed in further research.

Practical implications

The research shows the importance of a sustainability policy in forming commitment to sustainable business practice, as well as highlighting areas where the FM industry is lacking in commitment to sustainable business practice.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the implications of a sustainability policy in the development of sustainable practice in the FM industry. It also develops the link between the characteristics of FM companies and the level of sustainable business practice implemented.

Details

Facilities, vol. 29 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

1 – 10 of 159