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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Dan Moshavi, F. William Brown and Nancy G. Dodd

This study explored the relationships between a leader’s self‐awareness of his/her leadership behavior and the attitudes and performance of subordinates. Following…

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8670

Abstract

This study explored the relationships between a leader’s self‐awareness of his/her leadership behavior and the attitudes and performance of subordinates. Following previous research, leaders were categorized as overestimators, underestimators or in‐agreement. Results indicate that subordinates of underestimators reported significantly higher levels of supervisory and job satisfaction than did subordinates of those who were in‐agreement, and both subordinates of underestimators and those in‐agreement reported significantly higher levels of supervisory and job satisfaction than did subordinates of overestimators. No significant differences were found between the self‐awareness categories and transfer intent. Finally, subordinates of underestimators and those in‐agreement achieved a significantly higher level of productivity than did subordinates of leaders who overestimated their leadership ability.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Virginia K. Bratton, Nancy G. Dodd and F. William Brown

This research paper aims to follow a line of research that examines the impact of elements of emotional intelligence (EI), particularly those related to self‐awareness, on…

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20234

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to follow a line of research that examines the impact of elements of emotional intelligence (EI), particularly those related to self‐awareness, on self‐other agreement and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study that employs the same methodology as Sosik and Megerian to analyze survey data gathered from a matched sample of 146 managers and 1,314 subordinates at a large international technology company based in North America.

Findings

The analysis revealed that the relationship between EI and leader performance is strongest for managers who underestimate their leader abilities. Underestimators earn higher follower ratings of leader performance than all other agreement categories (In agreement/good, In agreement/poor, and Overestimators). The analysis also suggests that there appears to be a negative relationship between EI and leader performance for managers who overestimate their leader abilities.

Research limitations/implications

Implications of the counterintuitive findings for underestimators as well as the imperative for further study utilizing alternative measures of EI are discussed.

Originality/value

Previous empirical work in this area used an ad hoc measure of EI. This study extends this work by utilizing a larger, business sample and employing a widely‐used and validated measure of EI, the Emotional Quotient Inventory. Results further illuminate the nature of the relationship between EI and self‐other agreement and provide a potential selection and development tool for the improvement of leadership performance.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

F. William Brown, Scott E. Bryant and Michael D. Reilly

This study aims to examine the possibility of relationships between and among emotional intelligence (EI), leadership, and desirable outcomes in organizations.

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8676

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the possibility of relationships between and among emotional intelligence (EI), leadership, and desirable outcomes in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 2,411 manufacturing workers, engineers, and professional staff, the study empirically examined the impact of EI, as measured by Bar‐On's Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQI), on organizational outcomes; the well documented ability of transformational leadership to predict those outcomes, and the relationship between EI and transformational leadership.

Findings

The results confirm previous studies of the extraordinary effectiveness power of transformational leadership in predicting organizational outcomes. However, in this study no support was found for hypothesized relationships between EI and desirable outcomes or a significant relationship between EI and transformational leadership.

Originality/value

EI may be a useful concept in understanding leadership and social influence; however, unlike previous studies no indication was found that EI as operationalized and measured by the EQI is of particular value in that exploration.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

F. William Brown and Nancy G. Dodd

The positive association between transformational leadership and organizational and affective outcomes is well established in the literature. The relationship of…

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2905

Abstract

The positive association between transformational leadership and organizational and affective outcomes is well established in the literature. The relationship of contingent reward, a component of transactional leadership, to those outcomes and its additive and interactive relationship to transformational leadership is less well understood. In a study of 660 manufacturing workers working in 25 shop areas, transformational leadership and contingent reward had positive individual and additive impacts on supervisory and general satisfaction at both the individual and group level of analysis and on productivity at the group level. At the individual level of analysis, both satisfaction with supervision and overall satisfaction were enhanced by the interaction of contingent reward and transformational leadership operating together at certain levels. The operationalization of transformational leadership has contributed to the understanding of the inspirational and relationship aspects of leadership and contingent reward explains some, but not all, of the additional elements of successful leadership.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Myleen M. Leary, Michael D. Reilly and F. William Brown

For over three decades the Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a typology of personality preferences based on Jungian psychology, has been one of the most frequently used…

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13081

Abstract

Purpose

For over three decades the Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a typology of personality preferences based on Jungian psychology, has been one of the most frequently used assessments in personal and managerial development. Over the last decade attention to the possibility of non‐cognitive intelligence based on emotions has attracted considerable attention in both the academic and practitioner communities. This paper aims to report on an empirical study examining the possible relationships between the dispositional factors measured by the MBTI and elements of emotional intelligence (EI) as measured by the Bar‐On's emotional quotient inventory (EQI).

Design/methodology/approach

MBTI, Form G, and EQI data are collected in a population of over 500 managers and professional workers in an international manufacturing facility. Both categorical and continuous analysis of variance is utilized to test ten hypothesized relationships between personality preferences and EI constructs.

Findings

Results support the relationship between extroversion and the components of EI. Somewhat counter intuitively stress management, the measure of EI that captures an individual's internal focus, is related to extroversion. A positive and significant relationship between a preference for the use of feeling in decision making and an individual's EI is also found.

Originality/value

Despite the fact that the MBTI and the EQI are two of the most widely used instruments in organizational development very few studies have been done on their possible relationship. This is the first relatively large sample study of that relationship. Implications of the interaction of personality preferences and EI in organizational development are described.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

F. William Brown and Michael D. Reilly

This paper aims to study the possible relationship between elements of personality as measured by the Myers‐Briggs type indicator (MBTI) and transformational leadership…

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17861

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the possible relationship between elements of personality as measured by the Myers‐Briggs type indicator (MBTI) and transformational leadership (TL) as measured by the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ).

Design/methodology/approach

The study was done at the North American manufacturing facility of an international technology company. Utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire to measure transformational leadership, over 2,000 followers provided assessments of transformational leadership for 148 managers who had done self‐assessments and had completed Form K of the MBTI.

Findings

No relationship was found between follower assessments of transformational leadership and leader personality as measured by the MBTI. Leaders did, however, perceive themselves to be significantly more transformational than did those who reported to them. Leader preference for extraversion over introversion and intuition over perception were both significantly associated with self‐reports of transformational leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Studies utilizing large samples across a variety of organizational settings are needed to confirm the results of this study.

Practical implications

This study calls into question the existence of a relationship between the MBTI and transformational leadership. The study does not provide any support for the possible utility of the MBTI for the prediction or explanation of transformational leadership behaviors. Assuming that followers' perceptions of TL are the more valid, the findings suggest that previous results linking MBTI and TL may be measurement artifacts.

Originality/value

Utilizing a large sample, the MLQ and continuous measures of MBTI preferences the results of this study contradict previous reports of a relationship between personality as measured by the MBTI and transformational leadership.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

F. William Brown and Nancy G. Dodd

The effectiveness of the Competing Values Framework (CVF) as a means to determine human resource development needs was examined. Members of the board of directors and all…

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4514

Abstract

The effectiveness of the Competing Values Framework (CVF) as a means to determine human resource development needs was examined. Members of the board of directors and all full‐time employees of a Cooperative assessed the current status of the organizational culture and the nature of culture desired in the future utilizing a CVF based instrument. Both groups desired a future culture different from the present state, and both groups desired movement in the same directions. The study concludes that CVF analysis is a beneficial means for determining information about human resource skills needing to be developed and/or activated and which activities need to be rewarded or reduced in order to effect this movement.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Declan Doyle and F. William Brown

The Business Strategy Game is a PC‐based simulation that gives the players experience in developing and implementing strategies. The students run their company in a…

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3210

Abstract

The Business Strategy Game is a PC‐based simulation that gives the players experience in developing and implementing strategies. The students run their company in a competitive market setting against other teams. This forces them to take risks and anticipate competitor strategies. This paper is based on an international simulation game involving five teams of postgraduate business students from universities in Ireland, France and the US. The game was run in a “virtual environment” using e‐mail and videoconferencing. The attempt was made to simulate realistic competitive conditions as much as possible so that the concepts learned and solutions generated could be transferred from the classroom to the outside business environment.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1971

BRUCE MALLEN

This article explores the options available to a distributor in terms of the suitability of a channel of distribution with regard to the company's product market…

Abstract

This article explores the options available to a distributor in terms of the suitability of a channel of distribution with regard to the company's product market characteristics. Guidelines are presented for the construction of a channel selection procedure.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1899

In a previous article we have called attention to the danger of eating tinned and bottled vegetables which have been coloured by the addition of salts of copper and we…

Abstract

In a previous article we have called attention to the danger of eating tinned and bottled vegetables which have been coloured by the addition of salts of copper and we have urged upon the public that no such preparations should be purchased without an adequate guarantee that they are free from copper compounds. Copper poisoning, however, is not the only danger to which consumers of preserved foods are liable. Judging from the reports of cases of irritant poisoning which appear with somewhat alarming frequency in the daily press, and from the information which we have been at pains to obtain, there can be no question that the occurrence of a large number of these cases is to be attributed to the ingestion of tinned foods which has been improperly prepared or kept. It is not to be supposed that the numerous cases of illness which have been ascribed to the use of tinned foods were all cases of metallic poisoning brought about by the action of the contents of the tins upon the metal and solder of the latter. The evidence available does not show that a majority of the cases could be put down to this cause alone; but it must be admitted that the evidence is in most instances of an unsatisfactory and inconclusive character. It has become a somewhat too common custom to put forward the view that so‐called “ptomaine” poisoning is the cause of the mischief; and this upon very insufficient evidence. While there is no doubt that the presence in tinned goods of some poisonous products of decomposition or organic change very frequently gives rise to dangerous illness, so little is known of the chemical nature and of the physiological effects of “ptomaines” that to obtain conclusive evidence is in all cases most difficult, and in many, if not in most, quite impossible. A study of the subject leads to the conclusion that both ptomaine poisoning and metallic poisoning—also of an obscure kind—have, either separately or in conjunction, produced the effects from time to time reported. In view of the many outbreaks of illness, and especially, of course, of the deaths which have been attributed to the eating of bad tinned foods it is of the utmost importance that some more stringent control than that which can be said to exist at present should be exercised over the preparation and sale of tinned goods. In Holland some two or three years ago, in consequence partly of the fact that, after eating tinned food, about seventy soldiers were attacked by severe illness at the Dutch manœuvres, the attention of the Government was drawn to the matter by Drs. VAN HAMEL ROOS and HARMENS, who advocated the use of enamel for coating tins. It appears that an enamel of special manufacture is now extensively used in Holland by the manfacturers of the better qualities of tinned food, and that the use of such enamelled tins is insisted upon for naval and military stores. This is a course which might with great advantage be followed in this country. While absolute safety may not be attainable, adequate steps should be taken to prevent the use of damaged, inferior or improper materials, to enforce cleanliness, and to ensure the adoption of some better system of canning.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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