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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

A.H. Subratty, A. Gurib‐Fakim and F. Mahomoodally

This article focuses on some of the reported medicinal values of bitter melon, an exotic vegetable forming part of the cuisine of various countries.

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Abstract

Purpose

This article focuses on some of the reported medicinal values of bitter melon, an exotic vegetable forming part of the cuisine of various countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Available data in the literature strongly support the anti‐hypoglycaemic properties of Bitter melon. A literature view was carried out and the data were used to validate our findings regarding the effects of extracts of Momordica charantia on uptake of sugar.

Findings

Our work adds on to the growing evidence of the anti‐diabetic properties of bitter melon.

Practical implications

In view of evidence reported in the literature regarding the medicinal properties of vegetables, the importance of vegetables in a well balanced diet should therefore be strongly advocated.

Originality/value

This paper adds on to the evidence of the use of Momordica charantia as a medicinal plant in traditional medicine in the control of blood sugar level.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Adaora I. Onaga and Joy Odimegwu

Traditional African Health Systems (TAHS) is one of the earliest systems of health care known to humankind. It remains a sustainable practice in many indigenous cultures and in…

Abstract

Traditional African Health Systems (TAHS) is one of the earliest systems of health care known to humankind. It remains a sustainable practice in many indigenous cultures and in Africa accounts for the great majority of cures for illnesses despite the advent of Western Medicine. This chapter explores the concept of TAHS and the specialisations that constitute it. It looks at relational and contextual factors in the practitioners of TAHS within the continent that explain its viability. There are resources and knowledge passed on from generation to generation which make African Traditional Medicines a force to be reckoned with.

The authors look at the specific system of health education contained in the health-related adages which foster wisdom with respect to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of ailments. Situating education in its cultural context is one of the factors that has promoted TAHS. The authors compare some of these factors with Western Medicine and outline the benefits of encouraging mutuality rather than the dominance of one over the other. TAHS will definitely be a practice in the future and prospects have to include continued research in the areas of pharmacognosy, medical ethics, responsible health care, and education.

Details

Responsible Management in Africa, Volume 2: Ethical Work and Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-494-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

B.T. Badurally Adam, M.F. Mahomoodally, A.H. Subratty and D. Ramasawmy

Fruits and vegetables intake (FVI) in the human diet is strongly related to health status and incidence of diseases. The purpose of this paper is to hypothesize that demographic…

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Abstract

Purpose

Fruits and vegetables intake (FVI) in the human diet is strongly related to health status and incidence of diseases. The purpose of this paper is to hypothesize that demographic factors and food insecurity could be associated with the frequency of FVI in a multicultural community such as Mauritius.

Design/methodology/approach

Information pertaining to socio‐demographic factors, anthropometric measurements, medical history, lifestyle factors, reason(s) for dietary choice and food insecurity factors were amassed randomly from 374 adults.

Findings

The mean FVI was found to be significantly lower (p<0.05) for the food insecure respondents (n=39). Also, significant (p<0.05) associations between FVI and the level of education (p=0.031 and p=0.012, respectively), ethnic groups (p=0.028 and p=0.013, respectively), income ranges (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively), and food insecurity (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) were noted. A high income was also significantly related to a higher FVI. With respect to disease occurrence, a significant (p=0.035) relationship was found with respect to FVI and respiratory diseases.

Originality/value

The paper shows that there is a pressing need to re‐evaluate efficiency of existing nutrition policies and programs. Also that it is important to establish more sensitization campaigns geared towards the above‐mentioned target groups with respect to FVI. Authorities concerned should also endeavour to achieve affordable, accessible and safe fruits and vegetables as a mean to promote a healthy eating culture in Mauritius.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

J.S. Ramkissoon, Fawzi M. Mahomoodally, Nessar Ahmed and Hussein A. Subratty

The purpose of this paper is to focus on some of the reported natural advanced glycation end‐products (AGE) inhibitors providing an outline of AGE‐breakers and the potential…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on some of the reported natural advanced glycation end‐products (AGE) inhibitors providing an outline of AGE‐breakers and the potential anti‐glycation properties of some foodstuffs.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature searches were conducted to find a link between common household spices, medicinal herbs, AGE and diabetes which could lead to practical home‐based recommendations for changes in a person's diet.

Findings

Findings tend to indicate the potential of some dietary components to prevent and/or inhibit AGE formation. Thus, these dietary agents may be exploited for controlling AGE‐mediated diabetic pathological conditions and as possible natural protector of AGE formation in vivo. Consequently, the quest for new AGE inhibitors is considered of paramount importance which can be of therapeutic potential in patients with diabetes or age‐related diseases.

Practical implications

Studies on the inhibition of AGE formation have received increasing recognition from both a nutritional and medical research standpoint. Inhibition of the formation of AGE is believed to play a key role in the prevention of diabetic and cardiovascular complications. Investigation of nutritional bioactive compounds with anti‐glycation properties provides future perspectives for prevention or intervention related to AGEs complications.

Originality/value

This paper adds on to the evidence of the use of dietary agents as natural inhibitors of AGE and hence the prevention of diabetic complications and age‐related diseases.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2024

Yulist Rima Fiandari, Baroya Mila Shanty and Maylia Dwi Nanda

This study aims at discovering the antecedent of halal cosmetics’ purchase intention by conducting development on planned behavioral theory through adding the constructs of word…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at discovering the antecedent of halal cosmetics’ purchase intention by conducting development on planned behavioral theory through adding the constructs of word of mouth and religiosity. Attitude plays the role as mediation variable which correlates word of mouth and religiosity toward purchase intention and mediation variable between religiosity and halal cosmetics’ purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of this study was 196 Muslim women living in Indonesia. This research was conducted using online survey via google form. The collected data were analyzed using partial least square.

Findings

Based on the research findings, word of mouth did not directly influence halal cosmetics’ purchase intention. Religiosity variable also did not directly influence halal cosmetics’ purchase intention. Attitude played the role as the mediation between word of mouth and halal cosmetics’ purchase intention. Attitude was also able to become the mediation between religiosity and halal cosmetics’ purchase intention. Behavioral control and attitude directly influenced halal cosmetics’ purchase intention.

Practical implications

This research findings supported business owners to make sure the cosmetics’ safety for the sake of the users. Halal label is a guarantee that the cosmetics’ process has been through the raw materials selection, the standardized product processing and also the hygienic distribution process.

Originality/value

The literature development of halal products, especially cosmetics, is pretty much needed, as cosmetics users tend to increase throughout the world. Business owners can elevate halal cosmetics’ position through users’ recommendation to increase the economic potential value of halal cosmetics.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Dhamawatee Harnarun Etwaroo, Viswen Armoogum, Dayawatee Goburdhun, Arvind Ruggoo, Pooja Dookheea, Henna Thorul and Fahilah Zainab Noormahomed

The purpose of this paper is to determine the level of food additives, caffeine and total sugars in locally manufactured beverages in Mauritius and ascertain their compliance with…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the level of food additives, caffeine and total sugars in locally manufactured beverages in Mauritius and ascertain their compliance with national and international norms.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 48 beverages: 21 soft drinks, 14 ice teas, 5 fruit drinks, 5 nonalcoholic sparkling drinks and 3 tonic waters were analysed for the level of sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame K and saccharin), preservatives (benzoic and sorbic acid), colours (tartrazine, sunset yellow, quinoline yellow, allura red, amaranth, ponceau 4R, carmoisine, erythrosine, brilliant blue, green S and patent blue), citric acid, caffeine and total sugars. High-performance liquid chromatography methods used to quantify the levels of total sugars, caffeine and additives were validated against parameters such as linearity, recovery, accuracy, precision and limit of quantification.

Findings

Out of 48 beverages, 13 contained at least one sweetener. The most frequently used sweeteners were acesulfame K and aspartame. Benzoic acid was present in 27 samples (42.32–168.03 mg/L). Sorbic acid was present in 14 beverages (13.01–180.38 mg/L). Citric acid (0.7–4 g/L) was present in all the 48 beverages, while caffeine was present in 20 samples in the range of 14.01–129.42 mg/L. Nine samples contained at least one artificial colour and the most frequently used colours were tartrazine, sunset yellow, brilliant blue and carmoisine. The average level of total sugars present in the beverages was 10 g/100 ml. The validation parameters obtained showed evidence for method suitability.

Research limitations/implications

Beverages sold by individuals on the street, small restaurants and markets were not analysed.

Originality/value

This study provides an overview of the chemical composition of soft drinks and their compliance with Food Regulations. It also paves the way to investigate weaknesses, knowledge, attitudes and practices of local manufacturers, which leads to non-adherence to Regulations regarding food additives.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Christian William Callaghan

This paper aims to argue that certain insights offered by Kuhn and Foucault may be of use to those seeking to resist a global paradigm of inequality in access to the outcomes of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that certain insights offered by Kuhn and Foucault may be of use to those seeking to resist a global paradigm of inequality in access to the outcomes of pharmaceutical development. It is further argued that these relationships are not independent of certain power relationships. This critical review seeks to highlight certain of these power relationships, and to suggest how they might be better managed to ensure more equitable outcomes for those in society that are most vulnerable to innovation failure.

Design/methodology/approach

This research takes the form of a critical review paper, seeking to develop theory though a synthesis of literature.

Findings

Unlike market incentives, it might be the research process itself that is most vulnerable to stakeholder resistance to slow and unequal delivery of life-saving pharmaceutical development. Given that a lack of responsiveness to societal needs can itself be considered unethical, Kuhnian theory predicting pharmaceutical innovation failure is related to what Foucault describes as a system of oppression, whereby power relationships disadvantage those most vulnerable and powerless.

Research limitations/implications

Given the rise of movements like citizen science and participant-led research, as well as new ethical frameworks premised on increasing accountability in science, Foucault’s principles are considered to echo a general trend towards the democratisation of science, and towards increasing the responsiveness of pharmaceutical development to societal needs.

Originality/value

A novel synthesis of literature is undertaken, offering useful theoretical insights into how social actors might contribute to enabling a more responsive system of international healthcare business.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Edgar Rojas-Rivas, Angélica Espinoza-Ortega, Humberto Thomé-Ortiz and Sergio Moctezuma-Pérez

Demographic and socioeconomic changes, and health issues, promote interest in emerging countries for healthy foods, taking traditional foods under the perspective of functional…

Abstract

Purpose

Demographic and socioeconomic changes, and health issues, promote interest in emerging countries for healthy foods, taking traditional foods under the perspective of functional foods. Amaranth has moved from local to a wider consumption as a functional food. The purpose of this paper is to identify consumers’ perception about amaranth and its relation to consumption motives.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was applied to 610 respondents, and free word association determined their perception about amaranth through categories. Cluster analysis identified groups of consumers according to their motives for consumption. Global χ2 and correspondence analysis related consumers’ perceptions in the groups were identified.

Findings

A total of 16 word categories reflected consumers’ perception about amaranth. Most mentioned were: Traditional product, Hedonism and Health and well-being. Three groups showed significant differences regarding motives of consumption. It is concluded that perceptions about amaranth are closely linked to the motives of consumption. Perceptions of health benefits are related to motives for health issues and taste. There is a group that still consumes amaranth perceived as a traditional food.

Practical implications

As a functional food, these results could be useful to promote amaranth from its perception as healthy. Producers might develop products based on amaranth that meet perceptions considering gender and age in Mexico and other emergent countries.

Originality/value

This work contributes knowledge to international research that analyses traditional foods as functional foods and consumer perceptions on these. It is a first approach to identify perceptions of Mexican consumers towards amaranth as a traditional and a functional food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

Salvatore Ciano, Lucia Maddaloni, Mattia Rapa and Anna Maria Tarola

Hempseed oil is a valuable emerging food product with recognized health positivity due to its composition. The paper aims to propose a multi-methodological chemical profiling of…

Abstract

Purpose

Hempseed oil is a valuable emerging food product with recognized health positivity due to its composition. The paper aims to propose a multi-methodological chemical profiling of nine organic hempseed oil samples (different brands and prices) from the retail market, followed by multivariate data analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Fatty acids, tocopherols, squalene, total carotenoids content, phenolic compounds, total phenolic content and anti-radical activity (DPPH• and ABTS•+ assays) were determined through chromatographic and spectrophotometric techniques. Multivariate (explorative and discriminant) analyses were applied to the profiling results to classify samples according to information claimed on the label, i.e. geographical origin (EU vs. non-EU), extraction procedure (cold-pressed vs. not cold-pressed) and price (lower or higher than 10 € per 250 mL).

Findings

The chemical analysis confirmed the 3 to 1 ?-6:?-3 ratio and the excellent content in antioxidant species. However, no specific trend of results can be stressed. PCA (after variables selection) highlighted a natural grouping of samples, so three discriminant analyses were performed: kNN, Naïve Bayes and LDA. The best classification efficiency was reached for the extraction procedure verification (93–100% correct classification), followed by geographical origin (83–94%) and prices (81.6–90%).

Originality/value

The integrated approach of chemical profiling coupled with multivariate analyses allowed the assessment of label information of the analyzed organic hempseed oil samples, despite the wide heterogeneity of the selected samples.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 125 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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