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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Sarah Preedy and Paul Jones

The employment market means students need to be equipped with wide-ranging enterprising skills and experience. With small- and medium-sized enterprises crucial to the…

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3462

Abstract

Purpose

The employment market means students need to be equipped with wide-ranging enterprising skills and experience. With small- and medium-sized enterprises crucial to the health of the UK economy providing graduates with the skills to start-up their own business is also of increasing pertinence. The purpose of this paper is to analyse universities’ provision and delivery of student support in developing their enterprise knowledge, skills and experience outside of the curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

An e-survey of universities alongside three follow-up semi-structured interviews with participants and an in-depth case study was gathered. The e-survey quantified what enterprise support activities the sample institutions currently offered and the interviews and case study examined the delivery of those activities through the perceptions of university staff/students.

Findings

The respondents offered a range of enterprise support activity outside of the curriculum but delivery was hindered by a limited means to track proceedings. Support activities were predominantly concentrated both in delivery and receipt within business schools rather than across departments. Support typically consisted of networking events, business advice sessions and workshops as opposed to intensive provisions such as incubation space or start-up loans. The presence and influence of student-led enterprise groups was apparent.

Practical implications

The results will inform those staff involved in the planning and delivery of enterprise support activity at UK universities.

Originality/value

This research extends a limited literature mapping extra-curricular enterprise support provision at universities with qualitative data on the delivery of these activities as perceived by staff/students.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Karen Schucan Bird, Janice Tripney and Mark Newman

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of young people's participation in organised sport on their educational outcomes.

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1331

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of young people's participation in organised sport on their educational outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic review of the literature. A comprehensive search was used to identify all research evidence about engagement, impact and value in culture and sport. A combination of manual and automated screening was used to select studies for inclusion in this review based on pre-specified criteria. Included studies had to use a “high”-quality experimental research design, focus on children and young people and have quantitative educational outcome measures. Results from the individual studies were transformed into a standardised effect size and meta-analysis was used to combine the results from individual studies where appropriate.

Findings

Young people's participation in sport may lead to improved educational outcomes. Young people's participation in organised sports activities, when compared to non-participation, improves their numeracy skills. Young people's participation in organised sport linked with extra-curricular activities, when compared to non-participation, improves a range of learning outcomes for underachieving pupils. These findings are based on six “high”-quality studies conducted in the UK and North America. Study populations included young people within the range of four to 16 years old.

Originality/value

This paper builds on the existing evidence base in two main ways. First, it focuses specifically on the impacts associated with organised sport whereas previous reviews have had a broader focus. Second, it uses meta-analytic methods to synthesise study findings. This paper provides pooled effect sizes for overall educational impacts and translates these into potential changes in test/grade scores.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Jawad Abbas

Higher education institutions (HEIs) are responsible for training and transforming the students into valuable resources. Although students are believed to be the principal…

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1305

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions (HEIs) are responsible for training and transforming the students into valuable resources. Although students are believed to be the principal stakeholders in HEIs, limited research studies are available on service quality (SQ) in HEIs from students’ perspectives. This study aims to bridge this gap by investigating the factors, which constitute SQ in HEIs, specifically from students’ perspective, as existing literature on this topic is either from management and general perspective or is time dated.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study contributes by reviewing qualitative responses received through interviews and focus groups session with 43 students from 3 Turkey-based private HEIs. Data was collected from 43 students through 26 individual interviews and 3 focus group sessions and was analyzed through deductive reasoning using narrative and framework analysis with open coding.

Findings

The analysis of data indicated six main themes, specifically: teaching quality, facilities, support staff quality, employability links, safety and security and extra-curricular activities as indicators of SQ from students’ perspective. The findings of the study strongly comply with Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and take steps by identifying employability and safety and security as new emerging indicators of the existing literature of SQ in HEIs.

Originality/value

The existing literature lacks to provide qualitative data on SQ in HEIs from students’ perspectives in Asian countries, particularly, in Turkey, the place of current research. The findings of the present research provide valuable insights to HEIs’ management to understand students’ perceptions of SQ, their expectations and experiences.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Lorraine Cale and Jo Harris

This paper provides an update on the major developments in exercise recommendations for young people, and in particular, focuses on the most recent guidelines which have…

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3306

Abstract

This paper provides an update on the major developments in exercise recommendations for young people, and in particular, focuses on the most recent guidelines which have been developed in England by the Health Education Authority (HEA). The recommendations are contained within the HEA’s policy framework for the promotion of health‐enhancing physical activity for young people, Young and Active?, which aims to maximise the opportunity for participation in health‐enhancing physical activity. The paper discusses the practical application of the guidelines and provides ideas as to how they can be implemented by physical educators and health professionals. It proposes that the recommendations are more realistic, flexible, appealing and attainable than previous guidelines and that they signal significant progress in the field of exercise prescription for young people. However, cautions and messages highlighted in earlier reviews in the area still hold.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Fiona Rowe and Donald Stewart

School connectedness, or a sense of belonging to the school environment, is an established protective factor for child and adolescent health, education, and social…

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3555

Abstract

Purpose

School connectedness, or a sense of belonging to the school environment, is an established protective factor for child and adolescent health, education, and social well‐being. While a comprehensive, whole‐school approach that addresses the school organisational environment is increasingly endorsed as an effective approach to promote connectedness, how this approach creates a sense of belonging in the school environment requires systematic in‐depth exploration. This paper aims to address these issues

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the influence on school connectedness of a whole‐school approach to promote health in school, using a qualitative case study method. Three school communities in Southeast Queensland, Australia, are investigated as case studies in order to formulate a theoretical model of how health promotion approaches can build school connectedness.

Findings

This study finds that a health promotion approach builds school connectedness by encouraging a “whole‐school” orientation designed to foster interaction among members of the entire school community. Specific activities that promote interaction are school‐wide activities involving the entire school community and, at the classroom level, “whole‐class” activities in which students and staff work together on activities that create links between the two groups, such as collaborative curriculum planning. The “whole‐school” emphasis on partnerships between staff and students and parents is also important, particularly with its focus on initiating and sustaining school‐community partnerships.

Originality/value

The findings are important, since they validate a whole‐school approach to building school connectedness and address an important gap in the literature about how to promote school connectedness and thereby protect the well‐being of children and adolescents.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2019

Mercedes Mareque, Elena de Prada Creo and Maria Beatriz Gonzalez-Sanchez

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into the way leisure activities and soft skills relate to creativity in higher education. It determines which activities have…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into the way leisure activities and soft skills relate to creativity in higher education. It determines which activities have a positive impact on the student body’s overall education. Previous research evidences the relationship between specific leisure activities and creativity performance in several scenarios. Our work applies a broad range of these leisure activities to find results within our own specific student population.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on a survey of 303 Spanish students in Business Administration and Tourism. The study uses two instruments to measure the creativity of students, the Runco Ideational Behavior Scale (RIBS) and a three-dimensional construct that measures divergent thinking (originality, fluency and flexibility).

Findings

The results reveal that the average for creativity is higher for those students participating in some of the activities proposed. A positive correlation was also observed between the number of leisure activities and the creativity measures analysed. This confirms that students participating in more leisure activities display higher levels of creativity. Finally, the results display that the vast majority of students are involved in some type of activity, but two of the interpersonal skills that companies appreciate the most (reading and writing) are performed by very few students. This is especially the case of writing.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the pedagogical strategies that can be used in universities to motivate practising leisure activities as a mean of fostering creativity. It is important to note that the involvement of students in leisure activities can benefit from their integration into the labour market.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Anne Scheer

The purpose of this study is to explore rural children’s own perspectives on health, well-being, and nutrition to better understand how they approach, navigate, and make…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore rural children’s own perspectives on health, well-being, and nutrition to better understand how they approach, navigate, and make sense of these topics.

Methodology/Approach

This study uses a qualitative ethnographic research design theoretically informed by the “new” Sociology of Childhood and methodologically informed by constructivist grounded theory. This ongoing study with fifth-grade students in an elementary school in a small rural school district in central Illinois consists of ethnographic observations conducted at the school, in-depth interviews with students, and participatory tools that seek to involve students more fully in the process of data collection.

Findings

Preliminary findings of this pilot study suggest that many aspects often discussed in the context of childhood obesity, especially in rural settings, including knowledge or education about healthy eating, increasing physical activity levels, or access to healthy foods, are complex and multifaceted and do not easily lend themselves to standard interventions. Findings also indicate that children’s ideas about healthy eating deviate from their own eating practices.

Research Limitations/Implications

Conceptualized as a grounded theory study, the research is not intended to be generalizable or reproducible. Instead, the study seeks to develop hypotheses directly from the field and study participants’ views and voices. These perspectives will inform a more in-depth study of childhood obesity in rural settings planned for 2019.

Originality/Value of Paper

Findings from this pilot study will inform innovative, informed interventions that are guided by children’s own experiences and perspectives. Study findings will also be of benefit to practicing pediatricians and other child health professionals as they understand how to better think about and address challenges of health and weight management of patients and their families.

Details

Underserved and Socially Disadvantaged Groups and Linkages with Health and Health Care Differentials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-055-9

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Abstract

Details

Underserved and Socially Disadvantaged Groups and Linkages with Health and Health Care Differentials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-055-9

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Deirdre Horgan, Shirley Martin and Catherine Forde

This chapter draws on data from a qualitative study examining the extent to which children and young people age 7 to 17 are able to participate and influence matters…

Abstract

This chapter draws on data from a qualitative study examining the extent to which children and young people age 7 to 17 are able to participate and influence matters affecting them in their home, school, and community. It was commissioned by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs in Ireland to inform the National Strategy on Children and Young People’s Participation in Decision-Making, 2015–2020. Utilising Lundy’s (2007) conceptualisation of Article 12 of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child and Leonard’s (2016) concept of generagency, this chapter will examine children and young people’s everyday lives and relationships within the home and family in the context of agency and structure.

In the study, home was experienced by children generally as the setting most facilitative of their voice and participation in their everyday lives reflecting research findings that children are more likely to have their initiative and ideas encouraged in the family than in school or their wider communities (Mayall, 1994). Key areas of decision-making included everyday consumption activities such as food, clothes, and pocket money as well as temporal activities including bed-time, leisure, and friends. This concurs with Bjerke (2011) that consumption of various forms is a major field of children’s participation. Positive experiences of participation reported by children and young people involved facilitation by adults whom they respected and with whom they had some rapport. This locates children as relational beings, embedded in multiple overlapping intergenerational processes and highlights the interdependency between children’s participation and their environment (Leonard, 2016; Percy-Smith & Thomas, 2010).

Details

Bringing Children Back into the Family: Relationality, Connectedness and Home
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-197-6

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Simon Housego and Nicola Parker

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential and the challenges of successful integration of ePortfolios and graduate attributes into the curriculum.

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1374

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential and the challenges of successful integration of ePortfolios and graduate attributes into the curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

An argument is presented about the positioning of ePortfolios, and their links to graduate attributes, that draws upon the experiences of working with teachers to design, implement and support effective teaching practices to inform the challenges and opportunities that ePortfolios present for institutions, teachers and business curricula.

Findings

The potential of ePortfolios for supporting student learning must be balanced against the difficulties of embedding the necessary curriculum changes. Institutions expecting to see take‐up of ePortfolios by their teachers will need different strategies than those that accompanied the introduction of learning management systems.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on experiences in an Australian context and a small‐scale trial. The limited availability of studies of student learning and the longitudinal use of ePortfolios in the social networking Web 2.0 context are also limitations.

Practical implications

A range of potential uses of ePortfolios is considered with a particular focus on seeing their use from the whole‐of‐program viewpoint, with discussion of the limitations for curriculum if decisions about ePortfolio use are left entirely to teachers to decide.

Originality/value

The paper's value is in its argument about the potential for linking ePortfolios to an integrated curriculum by addressing a common problem with the process of embedding of graduate attributes, and in suggesting a role for changed assessment practices to make this possible.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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