Search results

1 – 10 of over 14000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Hanne Karlsen, Lisbeth Mehli, Erik Wahl and Ragnhild Lyngved Staberg

Investigations of food-borne outbreaks are complex and require multidisciplinary collaboration. The purpose of this paper is to help food technologists face this challenge…

Abstract

Purpose

Investigations of food-borne outbreaks are complex and require multidisciplinary collaboration. The purpose of this paper is to help food technologists face this challenge and be competent members of a multidisciplinary team, a study module on the investigation of a “real-life” food-borne outbreak was developed.

Design/methodology/approach

The module design was based on the principles of inquiry-based learning with the purpose to motivate and activate students with challenging assignments. The didactic impact of the module was evaluated as a qualitative case study with questionnaires, reflection assignments and interviews of students and lecturers.

Findings

A teaching module developed by an external professional taking part in the academic environment provides a learning environment well adapted to the curriculum, as well as bringing first-hand realism and enthusiasm into the classroom. The external lecturer’s dedication to the subject was appreciated by the students. A majority of the students believed that the outbreak investigation simulation play gave a better understanding of how food-borne outbreaks are investigated. A majority of the students 68 per cent (2011) and 82 per cent (2012) believed that what they learned in this module would be useful in a future work situation.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations to the study, the most important one being the small sample size, and as the classes rarely exceeds 30 students, the use of a control group was not logistically feasible.

Originality/value

Teaching food technologists to become knowledgeable professionals in this field will constitute a valuable contribution to the multidisciplinary food-borne outbreak investigation team. In turn, this may increase confidence among the general public in the food industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Penny Tinkler and Carolyn Jackson

In a climate of tightening quality controls and audits within higher education, the transparency of doctoral examination practices is increasingly the subject of scrutiny…

Abstract

In a climate of tightening quality controls and audits within higher education, the transparency of doctoral examination practices is increasingly the subject of scrutiny. Examines quality and standards issues that arise in relation to setting up, and preparing for, the examination of the research PhD. Specifically, the ways in which the examination is organised and the ways in which candidates prepare for the viva are addressed. The discussion draws on three sets of data collected between 1999 and 2001: institutional policy data; questionnaire data from PhD candidates, examiners and supervisors; and interview data with candidates before and after their PhD vivas.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Norman Rudhumbu and E.C. (Elize) Du Plessis

The study investigated factors influencing how the curriculum is implemented in accredited private higher education institutions (PHEIs) in Botswana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigated factors influencing how the curriculum is implemented in accredited private higher education institutions (PHEIs) in Botswana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated factors influencing curriculum implementation in accredited private universities (PUs) operating in a highly regulated higher education environment in Botswana. A total of six PUs which have been operating in Botswana for at least five years were purposively selected for the study. The mixed methods approach was used in the study. From the six PUs, a sample of 306 lecturers was selected from a population of 1,500 lecturers using stratified random sampling strategy for the quantitative phase of the study, and 25 academic middle managers (AMMs) were also selected from a population of 273 academic middle managers using purposive sampling strategy for the qualitative phase. A structured questionnaire and a semi-structured interview guide were used for data collection. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to test the reliability and validity of the measurements. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, one-way ANOVA and regression analysis were used for quantitative data analysis, while a meta-aggregative approach was used for analysing qualitative data. Results showed that educational level, characteristics of the curriculum, of the institution and of the external environment had a significant influence on how curriculum is implemented in PUs in Botswana, while gender, age and years of teaching experience did not have a significant influence. These results have implications on educational policy formulation by regulatory authorities as well as practice in universities for the purpose of enhancing curriculum implementation.

Findings

Results showed that educational level, characteristics of the curriculum, of the institution and of the external environment had a significant influence on how the curriculum is implemented in PUs in Botswana, while gender, age and years of teaching experience did not have a significant influence.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from lecturers in accredited private higher education institutions in Botswana only which limited the scope of insight into challenges facing accredited private institutions. Future research needs to expand the scope and consider private both private and public higher education institutions in Botswana and beyond so that more insight on the factors affecting curriculum implementation in higher education institutions can be established and appropriate policies and processes could be put in place for effective curriculum implementation.

Practical implications

The study provides insight into challenges affecting curriculum implementation in higher education institutions and how regulatory authorities, institutional authorities and lecturers can contribute to effective curriculum implementation in these institutions.

Social implications

The study offers an opportunity for higher education institutions to implement the curriculum in a manner that satisfies its primary customers who are the students by taking cognizance of and satisfying factors that contribute to effective curriculum implementation.

Originality/value

There is no study known to the researcher that has been conducted on factors affecting curriculum implementation in accredited private universities in Botswana. This study, therefore, is an eye-opener on such factors and what actions regulatory authorities, institutional management and lecturers should take to promote effective implementation of the curriculum in higher education institutions in Botswana.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Content available
Article

Bình Nghiêm-Phú and Thành Hưng Nguyễn

The purpose of this study is to examine the adoption of the active learning and teaching methods by university lecturers, taking into account the contribution of certain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the adoption of the active learning and teaching methods by university lecturers, taking into account the contribution of certain important factors, including trust, empowerment, thinking styles and emotional intelligence. In addition, this study further reveals the diverse nature of university lecturers with regards to their tendencies to adopt active teaching methods using the segmentation technique of marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured survey was implemented with university lecturers in Hanoi (Vietnam), obtaining a sample of 218 respondents from six universities. Descriptive analysis was carried out to identify the extent of the adoption of these methods. In addition, cluster analysis and analysis of variance were computed to extract and define the segments of university lecturers.

Findings

The findings show that the lecturers, on average, had a tendency to apply active teaching methods. However, the extent of the application of these methods differed among four clusters: “conservatives,” “liberals,” “junior conservatives” and “junior liberals.” In addition, it was found that the degree to which active methods were applied may have been affected by the lecturers' trust in and their empowerment of the students. The application of active methods may also have been influenced by various covert characteristics of the lecturers, including thinking styles (cognition-based) and emotional intelligence (affect-based). The lecturers' overt characteristics, such as age, education and experience, may also have affected their application of active methods, while biological sex seems not to have been a significant factor.

Originality/value

The results of this study expand the literature by explaining the diversity of university lecturers from the perspective of the active teaching and learning methods. They also provide implications for the management of education reform based on the varied implementation of the said methods that has already taken place.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Everard A. van Kemenade, Teun W. Hardjono and Henk J. de Vries

This paper seeks to find out which factors influence the willingness of professionals to contribute to a certification process and to understand the rationale behind this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to find out which factors influence the willingness of professionals to contribute to a certification process and to understand the rationale behind this willingness.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on literature, prerequisites are formulated for the willingness of professionals to contribute to certification. These are compared with the results of a study among lecturers at Universities of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands and Flanders about their willingness to contribute to accreditation of their schools. This study combines survey and Delphi research.

Findings

Professionals agree on the added value of certification systems. They are willing to contribute to the certification process, provided that a set of conditions is fulfilled.

Research limitations/implications

The case focuses on large organisations for which certification is obligatory. The findings may not apply in small or medium‐sized organisations or if the main driver for certification is internal improvement. Further research is needed to verify the generalisation of the results to other sectors and countries.

Originality/value

Research has shown that it is difficult to motivate professionals to contribute to certification. Little research has been done on the reasons why. The paper provides more insight into the difficulties that organizations face to commit their professionals to become involved in certification and turns these into requirements to be fulfilled to achieve commitment. These are relevant for organisations, which need the support of their professional employees to achieve management system certification.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

D.‐J. Peet, K.F. Mulder and A. Bijma

When sustainable development (SD) is only taught in specific courses, it is questionable if engineering students are able to integrate it into their engineering practices…

Abstract

When sustainable development (SD) is only taught in specific courses, it is questionable if engineering students are able to integrate it into their engineering practices and technical designs. For this reason, sustainability should also be integrated into regular engineering courses, e.g. design courses, materials courses or processing technology. The SD education plan adopted by the board of Delft University of Technology (DUT) in 1998 was based on this philosophy. It consists of three interconnected activities for all engineering curricula: the implementation of an elementary course “Technology in sustainable development”; the development of a graduation program in sustainable development for students who want to specialize; and the integration of sustainable development in all regular courses, wherever applicable. This paper describes various activities that the project group carried out to stimulate and support the third strategy: SD integration. It turned out that top‐down attempts to influence the content of courses often triggered resistance among lecturers, as they feared the intermingling of laymen into their scientific/engineering discipline. Interaction was important but was often impossible by lack of mutual understanding. Participation in a national project aimed to stimulate discussion by making disciplinary sustainability reviews of academic/engineering disciplines. This approach was promising as it created the base for serious discussions. However, the reports often ended in the bureaucracies of the departments. More positive results were achieved with a semi‐consultant approach directed at discussing SD issues with individual lecturers. Many lecturers were willing to discuss their courses, and were interested in practical ideas to integrate sustainability. This interactive approach is promising because it does not conflict with academic culture and keeps the lecturer in charge of his own course.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Dianne Thurab-Nkhosi, Gwendoline Williams and Maria Mason-Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which student assessments used in two capstone courses in a Master’s in Human Resource Management (HRM) Program were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which student assessments used in two capstone courses in a Master’s in Human Resource Management (HRM) Program were authentic, and encouraged confidence in competencies identified.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was taken to evaluate the perception of lecturers, clients and students regarding authenticity of assessments and the competencies achieved. The authors used a five-dimensional framework for authentic assessment developed by Gulikers et al. (2004) as a basis for an online survey of the students and focus group, reflection of the client and for self-reporting their reflections.

Findings

It was found that the assessments in the two courses were aligned with the five criteria of the framework for defining authentic assessments developed by Gulikers et al. (2004), however, there were challenges noted by the students and clients. Students reported attaining some of the competencies identified in the HRM graduate competency profile but needing reinforcement for more confidence. While the students felt that they benefitted, one major challenge of the authentic assessments was the heavy workload.

Practical implications

Graduate programs in HRM may be producing students without the relevant competencies and the confidence to perform, partly because approaches to teaching and learning and in particular design of assessments may not be sufficiently practical. The findings of this study can provide support for more authentic assessments in professional business education programs.

Originality/value

Few cases studies exist on application of authentic assessments to mastery of competencies in developing countries. This contributes to the discussion on competency-based education and authentic learning, with particular reference to developing country contexts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jinquan Zhou

The purpose of this paper is to discuss characteristics of dealers training and development in Macau gambling industry by investigating and analyzing the current dealers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss characteristics of dealers training and development in Macau gambling industry by investigating and analyzing the current dealers training and development status of Macau gambling casinos. Training and development prepare and enhance dealer's knowledge and skills to enable them to adapt to the working environment and create a career opportunity in their organization.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted with Macau casino human recourse manger, and questionnaire survey was used to investigate the views of dealers in training and development provided by their organization.

Findings

This paper revealed that the development and training of Macao's dealers are mainly in individual professional skills, including executive ability, professional attitude and communication skills training. According to the current situation of dealer's training and development, a human resource investment policy is that the government requires undertaking a part of the work in the dealers' community.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examined the current demand for talents in Macau gambling casinos focusing on dealers' survey of the casino's training concepts, including training perception, organization arrangement and training information, etc. It is the least published official information, and training and development program in Macau gambling industry wreaked the questionnaire design.

Practical implications

This survey first time revealed a characteristic of dealer's human resources training and development in the Macau gambling industry. The authors got comprehensive and profound understanding of dealers' job skills and career development needs through the professional position and job characteristics investigation and analysis.

Social implications

The investigation reveals the inadequately training offered for dealers pre-employment. At least, it cannot meet the gambling industry's basic needs for dealer occupation in many ways. The school's training of dealers and the training provided by the casino has a huge gap, which the school's training is a short-term, compared to the gambling enterprises on the professional skills requirements of recruit dealers. But the school in long-term provide a wider range of knowledge for dealers career development.

Originality/value

This research conducted by the author in 2017 showed that dealer training and development views could be used to in the gambling industry in human resource practical management.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sitalakshmi Venkatraman

This paper aims to provide a TQM framework that stresses continuous improvements in teaching as a plausible means of TQM implementation in higher education programs.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a TQM framework that stresses continuous improvements in teaching as a plausible means of TQM implementation in higher education programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature survey of the TQM philosophies and the comparative analysis of TQM adoption in industry versus higher education provide the theoretical and practical background for this work. The analysis of TQM in higher education was done considering various critical factors such as existing educational practices, the barriers of TQM and the return on investment (ROI) of TQM implementations. These explorations led to the development of a TQM framework that adopts Deming's wheel of Plan‐Do‐Check‐Act (PDCA) cycle for implementing continuous improvements in higher education programs.

Findings

Unlike the scenario in industry, TQM philosophies have to be adapted suitably for a successful implementation in higher education. The proposed TQM framework with six core quality elements encompassing the seven‐step course evaluation process flow provides a systematic guideline for an effective and efficient implementation of TQM in higher education.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils the need for a systematic, feasible and cost‐effective TQM framework for higher education. The new seven‐step course evaluation process flow offers a practical guidance for academics to implement TQM in higher education programs.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mohammad M. Foroudi, John M.T. Balmer, Weifeng Chen and Pantea Foroudi

How organizations view, value and manage their place architecture in relation to identification and corporate identity has received little research attention. The main…

Abstract

Purpose

How organizations view, value and manage their place architecture in relation to identification and corporate identity has received little research attention. The main goal of this paper is to provide an integrative understanding of the relationships between corporate identity, place architecture, and identification from a multi-disciplinary approach. It is assumed that the characteristics of the organization and of the way a corporate identity and place architecture are managed will affect employees’ and consumers’ identification.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a theory-building case study within the phenomenological/qualitative research tradition. The data were gathered through 15 in-depth interviews with top management who were working at a London-Based Business School. In addition, six focus groups were conducted with a total of 36 academics, and new empirical insights are offered. NVivo software was used to gain insight into the various influences and relationships.

Findings

Drawing on one case study, the findings confirm that firms are using the conceptualizations of corporate identity and place architecture, including the leveraging of tangible and intangible forms of consumers’/employees’ identification, toward a university business school. The insights from a single, exploratory, case study might not be generalizable.

Originality/value

The relationships between corporate identity, place architecture and identification have received little research attention and have hardly been studied at all from the perspective of this paper. This paper has value to researchers in the fields of marketing, corporate identity, place architecture, design, as well as professionals involved in managing a company’s architecture. Drawing on the marketing/management theory of identity and architecture alignment, managers and policy advisors should devote attention to each element of the corporate identity and place architecture and ensure that they are meaningful, as well as in dynamic alignment.

1 – 10 of over 14000