Search results

1 – 10 of over 56000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Zhou Jiang, Yiqi Jiang and Ingrid Nielsen

Workplace thriving is a psychological state that promotes employee health and development. In addition to presenting a useful instrument that captures the nature of a…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace thriving is a psychological state that promotes employee health and development. In addition to presenting a useful instrument that captures the nature of a thriving work life in China, the purpose of this paper is to investigate important factors that influence one’s thriving status within this national context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using diverse approaches across different samples, Study 1 contextualized the content of a workplace thriving scale (WTS) to fit the Chinese context. Study 2 tested the effects of learning goal orientation, exploration at work and role ambiguity on workplace thriving, employing a mediation model. As a supplement, Study 3 examined the test–retest reliability of workplace thriving.

Findings

Study 1 confirmed that in the Chinese setting, workplace thriving is a higher order construct represented by both a sense of learning and a sense of vitality. Study 2 found that learning goal orientation and exploration at work fostered thriving, while role ambiguity reduced thriving. Also, exploration mediated the relationship between learning goal orientation and thriving. Study 3 verified that the WTS was reliable over time in the Chinese setting, further increasing the reliability of results from Studies 1 and 2.

Originality/value

By rigorously and formally contextualizing the concept/construct of workplace thriving in China, this paper is informative for future research on thriving at work in Eastern cultures.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Surendra Kumar Sia and Pravakar Duari

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of agentic work behaviour and decision-making authority (DMA) to thriving at work and, more importantly, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of agentic work behaviour and decision-making authority (DMA) to thriving at work and, more importantly, the moderating role of DMA in the relationship between agentic behaviour and thriving.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has been carried out upon a random sample of 330 employees below supervisory level from manufacturing companies located at Odisha (a state located at the eastern part of India). After verifying the significance of correlation among the study variables through Pearson’s product moment correlation, moderated regression analyses were carried out to examine the independent contribution of agentic work behaviour and DMA to thriving as well as the moderating contribution of DMA towards thriving.

Findings

Results reveal that the three dimensions of agentic work behaviour, namely, task focus, exploration and heedful relation, have a direct positive contribution towards thriving at workplace. As far as the moderation is concerned, it is observed that the thriving level is higher for the employees having high DMA irrespective of the level of agentic work behaviour at each dimension.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply for designing interventions to enhance task focus, super-ordinate relationship and interest for learning. In addition, the organisations should provide autonomy to employees for decision making.

Originality/value

The study is first of its kind in the Indian context upon employee thriving. In this study, the authors have not only investigated the separate independent contribution of agentic behaviour and DMA, but also their interacting contribution to employee thriving.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Barbara Workman

The paper aims to explore factors that impinge on the “insider‐researcher” (IR) when undertaking a work‐based learning project, which will result in the creation of a…

Downloads
2194

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore factors that impinge on the “insider‐researcher” (IR) when undertaking a work‐based learning project, which will result in the creation of a context analysis framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, interpretative approach with the IR as central to the research process, together with data from students work‐based projects, research literature and texts, and an academic advisers' focus group.

Findings

Themes of benefits and constraints identified the organisation, the clients and co‐workers and the IR benefiting from work‐based projects. The positionality and personal attributes of the IR may be a constraint. Of major consideration are ethical issues arising from the project process. Academics' concerns include student supervision, the impact on the IR, and factors affecting change and project processes.

Research limitations/implications

A small study constrained by the researcher being central to the data and therefore introducing potential bias to the interpretation.

Practical implications

The creation of a context analysis framework as a tool to assist the work‐based student, the academic and the workplace in preparing to implement a work‐based project.

Originality/value

No similar analysis tool has been published. This can contribute significantly to the work‐based curriculum. The issues that concern researchers, academic practitioners and work‐based students during a work‐based project have not been previously investigated. A good practice guide for projects can result from this.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Umamaheswara Rao Jada, Susmita Mukhopadhyay and Rohit Titiyal

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the relationship between empowering leadership and the innovative work behavior of employees. Utilizing a moderated mediation…

Downloads
1990

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the relationship between empowering leadership and the innovative work behavior of employees. Utilizing a moderated mediation mechanism, the study additionally uncovers the mediating impact of knowledge sharing and the moderating influence of role clarity in the proposed model.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional design was used in the study, and developed questionnaires were administered to 235 supervisor-subordinates dyads working in Indian organizations to test the proposed relationships. SPSS 20 and AMOS 20 were used for statistical analysis.

Findings

The hypothesized moderated mediation model was supported. Knowledge sharing mediated the relationship between empowering leadership and innovative work behavior. The moderating impact of role clarity between empowering leadership and knowledge sharing was supported. It was also observed that stronger role clarity strengthened the indirect relationship between empowering leadership and innovative work behavior. Overall, the study shows that empowering leaders creates a cultivating climate for innovative work behavior by encouraging knowledge sharing among the members subject to clear identification of employee roles.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional design of the study limits the authors from drawing definitive generalizations. Self-reported measures used in the study increase the chances of bias.

Practical implications

Findings of the study can be utilized by leaders for promoting innovative work behavior in the organization, which has been identified as a key to organizational growth and development.

Originality/value

The study attempts to address the under developed relationship between empowering leadership and innovative work behavior.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2007

Jonathon R.B. Halbesleben and Anthony R. Wheeler

Changing work/family dynamics and economic developments have made it more likely that an employee might work with a family member or spouse. Such working relationships…

Abstract

Changing work/family dynamics and economic developments have made it more likely that an employee might work with a family member or spouse. Such working relationships offer a unique perspective by which to understand the work/family interface; however, relatively little research has explored the implications of working with family for employee stress and well-being. In this chapter, we review the existing research concerning stress associated with working with family. We integrate this research into broader demand/resource perspectives on employee stress and well-being, highlighting the manner in which working with family provides unique demands and resources through differences in work–family linking mechanisms. We conclude with suggestions for future research that might enhance our understanding of the work/family interface by considering the dynamics of working with family.

Details

Exploring the Work and Non-Work Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1444-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Andrés Hatum, Luciana Silvestri, Roberto S. Vassolo and Andrew Pettigrew

There is little doubt that organizational identity – that which is central, distinctive, and enduring about an organization – mediates in adaptive processes. Exactly how…

Abstract

Purpose

There is little doubt that organizational identity – that which is central, distinctive, and enduring about an organization – mediates in adaptive processes. Exactly how this mediation takes place, and whether it is favorable or unfavorable to adaptation, must still be fully established. The purpose of this paper is to add to the literature on identity and adaptation by exploring the relationship between these two constructs in family firms operating in an emerging economy. Based on measures of strength of identity, the authors examine how identity affects the adaptive processes of issue identification, strategic impulse definition, and implementation, where the authors look at pace of adjustment.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal and comparative case studies were conducted of polar types presenting two pairs of organizations in two separate industries. These organizations faced the challenge of founder succession and a radical shift in macroeconomic conditions over a period of three decades. Through these four cases the authors hope to provide clear pattern recognition of strength of identity and adaptation – and of the relationship between these two constructs – in the face of severe internal and external shocks. The approach seems adequate in the larger context of inductive theory development and particularly suitable to the exploration of theoretical constructs, as it allows the researcher to unravel the underlying dynamics of path dependencies and/or evolutionary processes.

Findings

It is found that strong‐identity organizations are able to foresee relevant changes in their industries, define adequate strategic responses, and implement them in an evolutionary (i.e. smooth) manner. Conversely, loose‐identity organizations misread industry trends, incur strategic paralysis, and must eventually enforce revolutionary (i.e. violent) changes in order to ensure survival.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a critical issue for the advancement of organizational theory: the relationship between organizational identity and adaptation in emerging economies. In addition, it has important practical implications for managers doing business in turbulent environments. It makes a sound theoretical contribution and has important managerial implications.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Margaret Hodgins and Patricia Mannix McNamara

The purpose of this paper is to explore the lived experiences of workplace ill-treatment of administrative and technical staff in the higher education sector, with a…

Downloads
1191

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the lived experiences of workplace ill-treatment of administrative and technical staff in the higher education sector, with a particular focus on organisational response.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative interpretative phenomenological research design was employed. Using non-random, purposive sampling strategies nine self-selecting participants from three of the seven universities in the Republic of Ireland were interviewed in person. Data were analysed thematically employing the Pietkiewicz and Smith’s (2012) four-stage data analysis model.

Findings

Thematic analysis yielded four main themes: micro-political nature of bullying, cynicism about the informal response, the formal procedures exacerbate the problem and significant and adverse health impact. Participant narratives engender the lived experience for the reader.

Research limitations/implications

As participants were self-selecting respondent bias is acknowledged.

Practical implications

The findings of this study add to the accumulating evidence that organisations are failing to address workplace bullying.

Social implications

In failing to protect employees, the adverse health difficulties experienced by targets of bullying are further exacerbated.

Originality/value

While the literature yields much in terms of types of behaviours and impact, and argues for anti bullying policies and procedures in the workplace, what is evident is the selective organisational use of policy and procedures and inherent biases in place which expose a reluctance to effectively protect dignity and respect in the workplace.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2006

Dwight Waldo

It is appropriate to begin with some observations on the development of Public Administration, for the development of Comparative Public Administration and its present…

Abstract

It is appropriate to begin with some observations on the development of Public Administration, for the development of Comparative Public Administration and its present problems are most clearly viewed in historical perspective: The logical problems are related to a chronological development.

Details

Comparative Public Administration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-453-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Nicole Gombay

The purpose of this paper is to show that, until the 1960s, subsistence hunting, fishing, and gathering were the mainstay of the economy for Inuit in the Eastern Canadian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that, until the 1960s, subsistence hunting, fishing, and gathering were the mainstay of the economy for Inuit in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. This economy was sustained by the moral imperative that food should be shared with others whenever possible. The article explores the experience of one man in Nunavik (Northern Québec) who has started a business selling food.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows that regulatory challenges facing the industry are considered in relation to the moral dilemmas that need to be confronted in moving from an economy based on sharing food to an economy predicated on market exchange.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with a discussion about how this businessman has come to terms with his breaking of social norms about the sharing of food and his understanding of how, in doing so, he is representative of a new economic order amongst Inuit in Nunavik.

Originality/value

The paper shows that this is an original and novel subject for study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Kaija Collin

The paper seeks to investigate design engineers' and product developers' learning through their work. The aim was to approach designers' work practice and their learning…

Downloads
1445

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate design engineers' and product developers' learning through their work. The aim was to approach designers' work practice and their learning in the course of it as perceived by the designers themselves. The aim is also to examine their learning through the various individual and social processes, which take place in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The ethnographic approach in this paper, with its use of combined and qualitative data gathering and analytical methods, was selected to approach the aim described above. Observations in two Finnish high‐tech companies and interviews with 18 designers were conducted. The observations and interviews were analysed with help of combined methods of analysis, such as phenomenographic, narrative and ethnographic analysis.

Findings

The findings in this paper suggest that in redefining designers' work and learning, four central themes are important: design practice is learning in itself; there is a close relationship between formal and practical knowledge in designers' learning at work; previous work experience plays an essential role in learning; and design practices and learning should be seen as shared, situated and contextualized.

Practical implications

In the paper general suggestions concerning the guidance of workplace learning are given, and the challenges of guiding and assessing workplace learning in the vocational education context are examined. There is a clear need for more effective integration between education and working life.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that individual and social practice and learning in the workplace should be analysed as interdependent and intertwined.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 56000