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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Marc Garcelon

The diversity of social forms both regionally and historically calls for a paradigmatic reassessment of concepts used to map human societies comparatively. By…

Abstract

Purpose

The diversity of social forms both regionally and historically calls for a paradigmatic reassessment of concepts used to map human societies comparatively. By differentiating “social analytics” from “explanatory narratives,” we can distinguish concept and generic model development from causal analyses of actual empirical phenomena. In so doing, we show how five heuristic models of “modes of social practices” enable such paradigmatic formation in sociology. This reinforces Max Weber’s emphasis on the irreducible historicity of explanations in the social sciences.

Methodology

Explanatory narrative.

Findings

A paradigmatic consolidation of generalizing concepts, modes of social practices, ideal-type concepts, and generic models presents a range of “theoretical tools” capable of facilitating empirical analysis as flexibly as possible, rather than cramping their range with overly narrow conceptual strictures.

Research implications

To render social theory as flexible for practical field research as possible.

Originality/value

Develops a way of synthesizing diverse theoretical and methodological approaches in a highly pragmatic fashion.

Details

Social Theories of History and Histories of Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-219-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Sue Llewellyn

People reason, learn and persuade in two distinct modes – through stories (narration) and by numbers (calculation). In everyday life narration is privileged over…

Abstract

People reason, learn and persuade in two distinct modes – through stories (narration) and by numbers (calculation). In everyday life narration is privileged over calculation. We understand our lives through narratives, narrating experiences first to ourselves – to convince others – and then to others – to persuade them. However, within the research community, calculating dominates narrating for reasoning, learning and persuading. This is the case for research in both the natural sciences and the social sciences. Although, in the social sciences, narratives are accepted as research inputs (in the form of interview transcripts), less thought has been given to narratives as research outputs. This article looks at the construction of narratives in accounting and management research, where there is now a significant, albeit a minority, interest. Three main issues are discussed: first, the potential for narrative research that identifies forms of argument (or strategizing) in the field; second, the usefulness of aggregating these individual strategizing accounts to construct emergent projects at the organizational level; and, third, the evaluation of this strategizing by revealing how it coalesces in and around key management control processes and events. The research question is “How are narratives best understood, constructed and used as forms of explanation and rhetorical argument in accounting and management research?”

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Alessandro Bosco, Justine Schneider, Donna Maria Coleston-Shields and Martin Orrell

This study aims to explore the coping styles that can be inferred from the discourse of dyads with dementia, and how these appear to impact on care management.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the coping styles that can be inferred from the discourse of dyads with dementia, and how these appear to impact on care management.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a case study approach. Participants were recruited from two teams managing crisis in dementia in the UK. The authors conducted multiple qualitative interviews with people with dementia and their family carers over the course of one month. The analysis was first performed through thematic analysis. Data were further analysed through narrative inquiry to create a story line, or play in our case, for our findings.

Findings

Five dyads were interviewed and a total of 16 interviews were conducted. Three dyads were husband–wife and two were daughter–mother relationships. The mean age was 67.4 years for carers and 79.8 years for people with dementia. In these cases, the carer assumed responsibility for managing the episode and was more likely to seek formal help if a pre-existing plan was in place. Otherwise, when a crisis arose, dyads preferred to avoid involving professionals.

Practical implications

Psychosocial interventions should aim to identify and replace unhelpful strategies used by dyads to manage crisis episodes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study using qualitative interviews of dyads to inquire into their experience of mental health crisis.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Andrew F. Herrmann

The purpose of this paper is to explore narratives in a new nonprofit arts center. It includes the macro‐, meso‐, and personal narratives that keep the center organized in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore narratives in a new nonprofit arts center. It includes the macro‐, meso‐, and personal narratives that keep the center organized in the midst of the chaotic everyday activities. It advocates the explanatory force of narrative as an alternative to organizational life cycle theory for understanding organizational startups.

Design/methodology/approach

This narrative ethnography involved participant observation, full participation, and narrative interviews over a three‐year period. Using grounded theory, narratives were examined to discover how they engendered and maintained order.

Findings

This paper contributes to the understanding narratives as a constitutional organizing and sensemaking process, including the narratives of “do it yourself,” and economic production, family and home, and personal narratives that constitute community, community boundaries, and identity, adding to our knowledge of organizing.

Research limitations/implications

The research examined only one local nonprofit arts center, therefore the findings are specific to this site and the same types of narratives may not necessarily be found in other nonprofits.

Originality/value

This paper examines a nonprofit during start‐up. It validates support for the examination of organizations through narrative ethnography and narrative interviewing. It purports that narratives constitute social identity, rather than being the evidence of social identity.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Yannick Fronda and Jean‐Luc Moriceau

A description of the managerial impact on change processes during a takeover with middle management in the telecom industry.

Abstract

Purpose

A description of the managerial impact on change processes during a takeover with middle management in the telecom industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to use storytelling as a form of analysis of different positions within an organization, as described in a case study.

Findings

By not including the voice of the middle managers, higher management runs into problems in the implementation of change processes.

Research limitations/implications

By using narratives as a source for analysis, the paper does not try to gain objective insights into change processes.

Practical implications

Resistance to change can prove a safeguard against too optimistic change.

Originality/value

The paper shows that several layers of change that interact with one another as proof of the confrontation between grand narratives and ante‐narratives.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Anthony James Rea

The aims and objectives of this paper were to understand the key influences hindering patients, participation in the contact tracing process for sexually transmissible…

Abstract

The aims and objectives of this paper were to understand the key influences hindering patients, participation in the contact tracing process for sexually transmissible infection exposure; to study the anatomy of a complex sexual network through the eyes of a committed contact tracer and a group of teenagers; and to identify lessons from the research. Unstructured and group interviews were undertaken with a group of sixth form students and an unstructured interview with a contact tracer. Cue (storyboards) cards and hypothetical sexual networks were used – the outcome demonstrated that generated narrative about sexual network experiences can be analysed using a schema of representation of experience and could be subjected to Labov's structural categories for assignment of spheres of action, to undertake interpretation. Themes identified include: confidentiality, secrecy, friendship, community, the law and social sanctions. We conclude that contact tracing is under the spotlight and that we need to understand the personal experiences of being subjected to a process where little consideration has been given to the social and psychological consequences. Narrative analytic strategies can be applied to gain this much‐needed rich data.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Malcolm Smith and Richard J. Taffler

Explores whether the firm’s discretionary narrative disclosures measure its financial risk of bankruptcy. Specifically examines the existence of an association between the…

Abstract

Explores whether the firm’s discretionary narrative disclosures measure its financial risk of bankruptcy. Specifically examines the existence of an association between the content of the chairman’s statement and firm failure. Show that these statements are closely associated with financial performance, reinforcing the argument that such unaudited disclosures contain important information. The results have implications both for the form and content of future narrative disclosures by management.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Malcolm Smith, Yinan Dong and Yun Ren

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between narrative disclosures and corporate performance based on Australian evidence. In particular it builds…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between narrative disclosures and corporate performance based on Australian evidence. In particular it builds a model which discriminates between good and poor performing companies based on their corporate narratives.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of Australian manufacturing companies is classified into two groups based on earnings per share (EPS) movement between 2008 and 2009. A content analysis of their discretionary narrative disclosures is used to classify and predict group membership.

Findings

This study finds that the word‐based variables based on discretionary disclosures are significantly correlated with corporate performance. Word‐based variables can successfully classify companies between “good” performers and “poor” performers with an accuracy of 86 percent.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively small sample size, for Australian manufacturing companies, limits both the predictive ability of the model and its generalisability elsewhere.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper demonstrate that certain keywords, notably the use of “high/highest” and “dividends” are significantly and positively associated with superior performance.

Originality/value

The study builds a classification model for continuing Australian companies, whereas prior research focuses on UK and US companies and is based on a healthy/failed distinction.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Cathy Guthrie and Alistair Anderson

This paper aims to argue that, while destination benchmarking and visitor surveys seek to measure the visitor experience, they privilege the destination manager or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that, while destination benchmarking and visitor surveys seek to measure the visitor experience, they privilege the destination manager or researcher rather than taking the visitor's viewpoint. It seeks to suggest that capturing and analysing visitor stories while in the destination can facilitate understanding of how destination image changes with actual experience, and what factors or attributes are important, thereby offering a deeper insight into the process through which destination experience is transformed (sense making) and transmitted (sense giving) via those stories, that all important word of mouth publicity.

Design/methodology/approach

Unstructured interviews were recorded with visitors in Edinburgh and Greenwich. An interpretive approach was employed in analysing the interview data to uncover facets of visitor experience affecting the image conveyed through the narrative.

Findings

The research reveals three elements involved in the sense making and sense giving process and sets out the three categories of visitor consumption characteristics which are implicated in the process.

Research limitations/implications

Although the outcomes of the sense making and sense giving process are mediated by the incidents, interactions and characteristics of the individual visitor, the process itself is common to all visitors. Analysing visitor narratives to uncover the mediating factors illuminates the visitor's actual destination experience and its impact on their understanding or image of a destination. Narratives proved to be a useful research tool.

Practical implications

The interview and analysis techniques used could be readily adapted for use alongside existing standardised visitor survey tools to provide destination managers and marketers a greater understanding of the impact of customer care and visitor management programmes and how narrative may be useful in tailoring destination marketing to meet the requirements of specific visitor groups.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the utility of capturing and analysing visitor narratives at the point of destination consumption for understanding actual destination experience and the way in which it is transmitted as word of mouth information to others.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Annemarie Jutel

Purpose – This chapter presents a case for reframing medical sociology to focus on diagnosis as a pivotal category of analysis via an extended literature review of the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter presents a case for reframing medical sociology to focus on diagnosis as a pivotal category of analysis via an extended literature review of the diagnosis as a tool of medicine.

Methodology/approach – Conceptual overview.

Practical implications – By reviewing the range of social functions served by diagnosis, and the similarly wide assortment of social forces that shape diagnostic categories, this chapter pushes social scientists and theorists to consider diagnosis as a cornerstone to the understanding of health, illness, and disease.

Originality/value of paper – Building on Brown's earlier call for a sociology of diagnosis, this chapter sets forth potential parameters for this field. It defines how the study of diagnosis is dissipated across myriad areas of scholarship, including medicalization, disease theory, ethics, classification theory, and history of medicine. Extirpating diagnosis and revealing it for specific discussion provides an opportunity to study topics such as illness experiences, health social movements, and disease recognition from a different and rich perspective.

Details

Sociology of Diagnosis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-575-5

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