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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Sunyoung Park and Chungil Chae

The purpose of this paper is to identify how intervention research weighed in nonintervention research in the field of human resource development (HRD) by examining the…

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3483

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how intervention research weighed in nonintervention research in the field of human resource development (HRD) by examining the number, citation frequency and use of experimental studies in HRD academic journals.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,700 articles published between 1990 and 2014 from Advances in Developing Human Resources (ADHR), European Journal of Training and Development (EJTD), Human Resource Development International (HRDI) and Human Resource Development Quarterly (HRDQ) were reviewed and analyzed to identify 91 experimental studies in the field.

Findings

The total citation frequency of the 91 articles was 1,100 (14 from ADHR, 222 from EJTD, 56 from HRDI and 808 from HRDQ). The authors reviewed the 1,100 subsequent studies that cited 91 experimental research studies and coded them to identify the research methods that each article adopted and to determine whether the studies used the citation to make causal statements. As a result, the authors found 459 causal statements from 1,100 citations. In particular, they identified the citation frequency of the causal statements used in nonintervention research to examine how often nonintervention studies used causal statements from intervention studies.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the citation frequency could be different according to the search engines and timeframes. Books, technical reports, non-English studies, non-academic articles and inaccessible articles were not considered in this study. Theoretically, this study aimed to illuminate the magnitude of HRD experimental research conducted over 25 years and to what extent it influenced non-experimental studies. In addition, this study emphasized the importance of using the causal statements from experimental research to improve empirical validation in other studies.

Practical implications

When HRD practitioners need to identify alternative interventions to replace previous ones or to justify the use of specific interventions, they could consider causal statements from empirical studies as valid evidence. Further, HRD practitioners might collaborate with researchers to receive more direct and relevant information from experimental research.

Originality/value

Significantly, this study provides an integrative review of experimental research conducted in the field of HRD in terms of the number, citation frequency and proportion of using experimental research. An additional contribution is that it summarizes the research methods used in HRD studies over 25 years.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Lawrence Hoc Nang Fong, Rob Law, Candy Mei Fung Tang and Matthew Hong Tai Yap

This paper aims to examine the prevalence and trend of experimental research in hospitality and tourism. Hospitality and tourism researchers have long been encouraged to…

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3894

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the prevalence and trend of experimental research in hospitality and tourism. Hospitality and tourism researchers have long been encouraged to increase their use of experimental designs. However, a solid support for such advocacy is lacking, and the present paper fills in this research gap.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a systematic approach, this study reviews 161 tourism and hospitality articles and conducts content analysis based on certain criteria including journal outlets, Social Sciences Citation Index journals, years of publication, contexts, disciplinary foci, experimental designs, settings, number of independent variables, number of studies per article, manipulation methods, manipulation check, research subjects, sample size, subjects per experimental condition, statistical analyses and provision of effect size. The criteria between hospitality and tourism publications are also compared.

Findings

Findings show that the number of experimental publications has significantly increased over the past decade, especially in hospitality publications. Nonetheless, there is still room for improvement in applying the experimental design in hospitality and tourism research.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers in hospitality and tourism are recommended to report manipulation check results and the effect size of statistically significant results, as well as to devote more effort to knowledge accumulation and methodological advancement of experimental designs.

Originality/value

This study is the first to review experimental research in hospitality and tourism. The findings of this study provide significant implications and directions for hospitality and tourism researchers to conduct experimental research in the future.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2014

David B. Zoogah and Richard B. Zoogah

We discuss how experimental analysis can be integrated into strategic human resources management (SHRM) research in Africa so as to develop theory and value principles to…

Abstract

Purpose

We discuss how experimental analysis can be integrated into strategic human resources management (SHRM) research in Africa so as to develop theory and value principles to guide executives.

Design/methodology/approach

The model we propose – experiment-based SHRM – is predicated on the use of experimental approaches to demonstrate the value of SHRM and to derive principles that guide research and practice in Africa.

Findings

We illustrate how scholars can conduct experiments from an SHRM perspective.

Research limitations/implications

We discuss the strengths and limitations of the model and suggest ways of maximizing its potential.

Practical implications

The technique is a resource for scholars of SHRM in Africa. They can use it to supplement other approaches for studying SHRM.

Originality/value

This chapter discusses a typology of experimental analysis. The lack of such a typology in the context of Africa makes it a valuable contribution. Thus, it fills a contextual gap in the SHRM research methodology literature. It can therefore help graduate students and junior faculty improve their research.

Details

Advancing Research Methodology in the African Context: Techniques, Methods, and Designs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-489-4

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Chokri Barhoumi

This research paper aims to explore the impact of using wiki activities to support a blended learning course (70 per cent in-class and 30 per cent PBwiki activities) on…

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497

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to explore the impact of using wiki activities to support a blended learning course (70 per cent in-class and 30 per cent PBwiki activities) on the knowledge management of library and information science (LIS) students compared to 100 per cent in-class learning.

Design/methodology/approach

In the 2015 academic year, the researcher compared an experimental group (41 students) and a control group (41 students). Instruction of the experimental group was based on combining 2 h (70 per cent) of in-class learning and 1 h (30 per cent) of wiki-based learning activities each week. The control group’s experience was 100 per cent in a physical classroom without the use of a wiki. The researcher used a t-test to compare the means of the control and experimental groups in achievement tests and the students’ attitudes based on principles of activity theory (technological, individual and community levels) at 0.05 alpha levels.

Findings

The principal results of the study are that students in the experimental group perform better than those in the control group on the achievement test, learning tracks and attitudes. Learning tracks analysis shows that students in the experimental group had greater participation in different topics of discussion in the PBwiki than did the control group. The first topic discussed by students in the wiki is related to exam revision, and the second topic is related to the course content.

Originality/value

This research paper is useful for readers, parents, students and schools to explore the effectiveness of PBwiki activities to support blended courses in LIS education.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Gregory A. Liyanarachchi

The unavailability of practitioners is one of the disturbing realities that often prevent the use of experimental methods in accounting research. The availability of…

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1353

Abstract

Purpose

The unavailability of practitioners is one of the disturbing realities that often prevent the use of experimental methods in accounting research. The availability of pragmatic alternatives to accounting practitioners demands that researchers explore such alternatives fully before conducting expensive experiments with practitioners. However, the use of students as surrogates for non‐students has been a controversial issue and this has led to an under‐utilization of the experimental method in management accounting research. Recent research has warned that relying solely on practitioners as subjects in experimental methods may result in “negative externalities”. The purpose of this paper is to inquire in to the feasibility of using student subjects in behavioral accounting research so that better judgments can be made about the benefits and dangers of using students in experiments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on a review and synthesis of the literature on the student surrogate debate.

Findings

The paper shows that accounting students may be adequate surrogates for practitioners in many decision‐making experiments.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates that maintaining the experimental realism of a study and replications are more important than the type of subject when generalizing results.

Originality/value

The paper provides an analysis and synthesis of literature that will enable researchers to make sound judgments about the selection of subjects for experiments.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Katharina Maag Merki

In school improvement studies, randomized experiments are rare. A special problem is the assignment to the experimental and control groups, taking into account the…

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1259

Abstract

Purpose

In school improvement studies, randomized experiments are rare. A special problem is the assignment to the experimental and control groups, taking into account the different starting conditions at the schools in terms of school improvement competencies. The purpose of this paper is to take the example of an intervention study conducted in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, the extent to which the challenges involved with a quasi-experimental design were addressed is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The intervention study was conducted with 54 math teachers (experimental group: n=29; control group: n=25) and their grade 7 and 8 classes (n=1,054) at 13 secondary schools. It aimed to increase teacher cooperation on teaching for promotion of students’ self-regulated learning. T-tests, Mann-Whitney tests, ANOVA, multilevel regression analyses were conducted.

Findings

At the beginning of the intervention, the teachers in the two groups did not differ significantly in prior cooperation on teaching processes and in attitudes toward cooperation. However, they differed in prior cooperation on school framework conditions and teaching processes. The intervention was effective in increasing teachers’ cooperation intensity on instruction, and teachers’ attitude toward binding cooperation. However, teaching processes did not change depending on experimental or control group.

Research limitations/implications

Teacher cooperation practice was assessed only by teachers’ self-report. No indicators on the quality of the cooperation among teachers were included.

Practical implications

The paper discusses the challenges and limitations of conducting intervention studies on school improvement. Implications for further research are given.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how quasi-experimental designs can be implemented in intervention studies on school improvement.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Sun-Ki Chai, Dolgorsuren Dorj and Katerina Sherstyuk

Culture is a central concept broadly studied in social anthropology and sociology. It has been gaining increasing attention in economics, appearing in research on labor…

Abstract

Culture is a central concept broadly studied in social anthropology and sociology. It has been gaining increasing attention in economics, appearing in research on labor market discrimination, identity, gender, and social preferences. Most experimental economics research on culture studies cross-national or cross-ethnic differences in economic behavior. In contrast, we explain laboratory behavior using two cultural dimensions adopted from a prominent general cultural framework in contemporary social anthropology: group commitment and grid control. Groupness measures the extent to which individual identity is incorporated into group or collective identity; gridness measures the extent to which social and political prescriptions intrinsically influence individual behavior. Grid-group characteristics are measured for each individual using selected items from the World Values Survey. We hypothesize that these attributes allow us to systematically predict behavior in a way that discriminates among multiple forms of social preferences using a simple, parsimonious deductive model. The theoretical predictions are further tested in the economics laboratory by applying them to the dictator, ultimatum, and trust games. We find that these predictions are confirmed overall for most experimental games, although the strength of empirical support varies across games. We conclude that grid-group cultural theory is a viable predictor of people’s economic behavior, then discuss potential limitations of the current approach and ways to improve it.

Details

Experimental Economics and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-819-4

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2016

Rajashi Ghosh and Seth Jacobson

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a critical review of the mediation studies published in the field of Human Resource Development (HRD) to discern if the study

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a critical review of the mediation studies published in the field of Human Resource Development (HRD) to discern if the study designs, the nature of data collection and the choice of statistical methods justify the causal claims made in those studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a critical review of published refereed articles that examined mediation in Human Resource Development Quarterly, Human Resource Development International, Advances in Developing Human Resources and European Journal of Training and Development. Mediation studies published in these journals from 2000 to 2015 were identified and coded. The four journals sampled were chosen to provide breadth of coverage of the different types of empirical studies published in the field of HRD.

Findings

The review findings imply that HRD scholars are not employing experimental or longitudinal designs in their studies when randomized experiments and longitudinal studies with at least three waves of data collection are regarded as the golden standards of causal research. Further, the findings indicate that sophisticated statistical modeling approaches like structural equation modeling are widely used to examine mediation in cross-sectional studies and most importantly, a large number of such studies do not acknowledge that cross-sectional data does not allow definite causal claims.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings urge us to rethink the inferences of mediation effects reported over the past 15 years in the field of HRD, this study also serves as a guide in thinking about framing and testing causal mediation models in future HRD research and even argues for a paradigm shift from a positivist orientation to critical and postmodern perspectives that can accommodate mixed methods designs for mediation research in HRD.

Originality/value

This paper presents a critical review of the trends in examining mediation models in the HRD discipline, suggests best practices for researchers examining the causal process of mediation and directs readers to recent methodological articles that have discussed causal issues in mediation studies.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Laila Suleiman Al-Rawahi and Abdu Mohammad Al-Mekhlafi

The present study investigated the effect of online collaborative project-based learning on the language performance and attitudes of intermediate level students at the…

Abstract

The present study investigated the effect of online collaborative project-based learning on the language performance and attitudes of intermediate level students at the College of Applied Sciences in Oman. The study is a quasi-experimental study and the sample consisted of four classes (93 students in total) in Nizwa College of Applied Sciences. These participants were in their foundation year and were taking the Academic English Course during the time of the research experiment. Two classes were assigned to the experimental group (46 students) and they were directed to collaborate online in doing their research projects. The other two classes were assigned to the control group (47 students) and did their projects individually. A language test containing reading and writing questions, an attitude questionnaire, students' project scores and transcripts of focused group discussions were used to collect the data needed to answer the research questions. The study revealed that the main positive effect of online collaborative project-based learning was clear on students' writing skill in the post test (i.e. students in the experimental group outperformed students in the control group).

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Wei-Tsong Wang and Ying-Lien Lin

This study aimed to examine whether the use of wiki-systems in healthcare internship courses that adopt a problem-based learning approach may have significant influences…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine whether the use of wiki-systems in healthcare internship courses that adopt a problem-based learning approach may have significant influences on the relationships among students' relationship commitment, knowledge-sharing behavior and perceived problem-based learning performance in the context of higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a quasi-experimental approach. Cross-sectional survey data collected from 187 undergraduate students in Taiwan were used for the data analysis procedures. The students in the experimental group used wiki-systems and a set of information and communication technologies as learning tools, while the students in the control group used the same set of information and communication technologies only. The statistical techniques of independent t-tests and component-based structural equation modeling were adopted to examine the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal significant differences between the experimental and control groups concerning relationship commitment, knowledge-sharing behavior, independent study and active participation. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding group interaction and reasoning skills. Additionally, all the hypotheses regarding the relationships among constructs were supported.

Originality/value

Wiki-systems have unique features that can enhance the effectiveness of problem-based learning activities. This study is among the first to investigate how wiki-systems may affect the effectiveness of problem-based learning processes by investigating the relationships among healthcare students' relationship commitment, knowledge-sharing behavior and perceived problem-based learning performance. The results of this study can advance the current understanding of the effectiveness of wiki-based problem-based learning in the context of healthcare education.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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