Search results

1 – 10 of over 24000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Arjen van Witteloostuijn

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the time is ripe to establish a powerful tradition in Experimental International Business (IB). Probably due to what the Arjen…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the time is ripe to establish a powerful tradition in Experimental International Business (IB). Probably due to what the Arjen van Witteloostuijn refers to as the external validity myth, experimental laboratory designs are underutilized in IB, which implies that the internal validity miracle of randomized experimentation goes largely unnoticed in this domain of the broader management discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

In the following pages, the author explains why the author believes this implies a missed opportunity, providing arguments and examples along the way.

Findings

Although an Experimental Management tradition has never really gained momentum, to the author, the lab experimental design has a very bright future in IB (and management at large). To facilitate the development of an Experimental IB tradition, initiating web-based tools would be highly instrumental. This will not only boost further progress in IB research, but will also increase the effectiveness and playfulness of IB teaching.

Originality/value

Given the high potential of an Experimental IB, the Cross-Cultural and Strategic Management journal will offer a platform for such exciting and intriguing laboratory work, cumulatively contributing to the establishment of an Experimental IB tradition.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Lawrence Hoc Nang Fong, Rob Law, Candy Mei Fung Tang and Matthew Hong Tai Yap

This paper aims to examine the prevalence and trend of experimental research in hospitality and tourism. Hospitality and tourism researchers have long been encouraged to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the prevalence and trend of experimental research in hospitality and tourism. Hospitality and tourism researchers have long been encouraged to increase their use of experimental designs. However, a solid support for such advocacy is lacking, and the present paper fills in this research gap.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a systematic approach, this study reviews 161 tourism and hospitality articles and conducts content analysis based on certain criteria including journal outlets, Social Sciences Citation Index journals, years of publication, contexts, disciplinary foci, experimental designs, settings, number of independent variables, number of studies per article, manipulation methods, manipulation check, research subjects, sample size, subjects per experimental condition, statistical analyses and provision of effect size. The criteria between hospitality and tourism publications are also compared.

Findings

Findings show that the number of experimental publications has significantly increased over the past decade, especially in hospitality publications. Nonetheless, there is still room for improvement in applying the experimental design in hospitality and tourism research.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers in hospitality and tourism are recommended to report manipulation check results and the effect size of statistically significant results, as well as to devote more effort to knowledge accumulation and methodological advancement of experimental designs.

Originality/value

This study is the first to review experimental research in hospitality and tourism. The findings of this study provide significant implications and directions for hospitality and tourism researchers to conduct experimental research in the future.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Eugene F. Stone‐Romero and Patrick J. Rosopa

Tests of assumed mediation models are common in research in many disciplines, including managerial psychology, industrial and organizational psychology, organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

Tests of assumed mediation models are common in research in many disciplines, including managerial psychology, industrial and organizational psychology, organizational behavior, and organizational theory. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to detail experimental design options for conducting such tests in a manner that has the potential to yield results that have high levels of internal and construct validity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a logical analysis of strategies for testing mediation models so as to insure valid inferences about causal relations between variables.

Findings

The most appropriate strategy for testing assumed mediation models is research that uses randomized experimental designs.

Practical implications

Managers should base their actions on valid evidence about phenomena. More specifically, managerial actions should be predicated on research results that have high levels of internal, construct, and statistical conclusion validity. Thus, this paper encourages managers to base decisions about organizational policies and practices on well‐designed experimental research.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a number of points about issues involving internal and construct validity in tests of assumed causal models that have not been covered in previous work.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Sylvain Max and Valérie Ballereau

The purpose of this paper is to approach women's entrepreneurship from a social psychological perspective, with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to approach women's entrepreneurship from a social psychological perspective, with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomena and to its development as a field of research.

Design/methodology/approach

The gender aspect of entrepreneurship is essentially socio‐psychological in nature. First, the authors define the social psychology research scope and present a selection of social psychology theories that are particularly relevant to the domain of women's entrepreneurship. Concepts such as stereotypes, stereotype threat and role models are introduced. Second, the authors instantiate how the social psychology experimental method can address core questions in the women's entrepreneurship field, such as women's under‐representation in entrepreneurial positions.

Findings

The conclusion of this paper is twofold: on the one hand, social psychology theories can address crucial issues in women's entrepreneurship and on the other hand, experimentation as a research methodology enables us to determine causal relationships. However, given the specificities of both social psychology and women's entrepreneurship, we strongly recommend collaborative research between researchers in the two areas.

Research limitations/implications

The authors propose concrete though non‐exhaustive areas of study in women's entrepreneurship research, where social psychological theories can be successfully employed.

Social implications

Using applied social psychology research, the authors suggest practical ways to reject negative stereotypes that prevent women from being entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

Although women's entrepreneurship is a social psychological phenomenon, this field of study still rarely makes reference to social psychology as a discipline for theorizing the relationship between gender and entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Sandra G.L. Schruijer and Petru L. Curseu

– The paper aims to describe and understand the gap between the psychodynamic literature on groups and the social psychological perspective on group dynamics.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe and understand the gap between the psychodynamic literature on groups and the social psychological perspective on group dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

As Wilfred Bion is the most influential group dynamics representative of the psychodynamic tradition the authors performed a citation analysis of Bion's work to find out whether it influenced the social psychological research on group dynamics. They compared three domains of literature: therapy/clinical, management/organization studies and social psychology. Moreover, they depict (by drawing on interviews with European pioneers in social psychology) the historical context in which European social psychology developed to explain the gap between the psychodynamic and social psychological approaches in the study of group dynamics.

Findings

The results clearly indicate the existence of a gap between the social psychological and psychodynamic perspectives on group dynamics. Moreover, the authors show that Bion did influence scholars studying or working with real-life groups and is cited more by American than European scholars. The attempt to build a legitimate scientific identity for social psychology provides a context for understanding of the neglect of the psychodynamic tradition.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude by exploring ways in which the psychodynamic tradition may fertilize the social psychological tradition in studying groups.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to address the discrepancy between the social psychological and psychodynamic perspectives in the study of group dynamics.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Floris Heukelom

George Loewenstein, a prominent behavioral economist, recalls thatIn 1994, when Thaler, Camerer, Rabin, Prelec and I spent the year at the Center for Advanced Study in the…

Abstract

George Loewenstein, a prominent behavioral economist, recalls thatIn 1994, when Thaler, Camerer, Rabin, Prelec and I spent the year at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, we had a meeting to make a kind of final decision about what to call what we were doing. Remarkably, at that time, the name behavioral economics was not yet well established. I actually advocated “psychological economics,” and Thaler was strong on behavioral economics. I'm kind of glad that he prevailed; I think it's a better, catchier, label, although it creates confusion due to association with Behaviorism. (G. Loewenstein, personal email to author, June 16, 2008)

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-006-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2005

Andreas Ortmann

The results of standard lab experiments have long been questioned because of the convenience samples of subjects they typically employ and the abstract nature of the lab…

Abstract

The results of standard lab experiments have long been questioned because of the convenience samples of subjects they typically employ and the abstract nature of the lab settings. These two characteristics of experimental economics, it is argued, are the key factors that endanger the external validity of experiments.

Researchers have tried to address these issues by bringing the lab to non-traditional subjects including participants in remote locations, and/or by moving the setting of experiments closer to reality by using real goods and/or settings that are not stripped of context.

While field experiments might help experimental economists to increase the external validity of their investigations, these potential benefits might come at costs that can be considerable. Specifically, going into the field can dramatically increase the demands on, and challenges to, experimental control. This is particularly true for experiments in small-scale societies in remote locations on which I focus in this article.

Details

Field Experiments in Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-174-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Larry S. Perry

Psychology, the scientific study of the mind and of behavior, has experienced a rapid professional growth during the past 30 years. The number of research articles…

Abstract

Psychology, the scientific study of the mind and of behavior, has experienced a rapid professional growth during the past 30 years. The number of research articles published each year continues to multiply, attendance at professional meetings and conferences increases at an almost exponential rate, and students continue to enroll in psychology courses in large numbers.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Bernard Scott

This paper reviews the contributions of Gordon Pask, cybernetician, to the discipline of psychology as a methodologist and as a theoretician. Pask was prolific in many…

Abstract

This paper reviews the contributions of Gordon Pask, cybernetician, to the discipline of psychology as a methodologist and as a theoretician. Pask was prolific in many fields but especially so in psychology both as an innovative experimenter and an innovative theorist. Over four decades, Pask carried out experimental studies of learning, problem solving and decision making, often using sophisticated computer‐based environments. These latter, in turn, inspired the design of teaching machines and learning environments with practical applications in education and training. Pask’s theorizing while addressing detailed methodological and conceptual issues was also holistic and unifying in intent, not least in his proposals for rapprochements between process, individual and social psychologies.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 24000