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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Sara Melén Hånell, Emilia Rovira Nordman and Lars-Gunnar Mattsson

This study addresses the research question: How does the experiential knowledge, superstitious knowledge and the wisdom of CEOs influence the internationalization…

Abstract

Purpose

This study addresses the research question: How does the experiential knowledge, superstitious knowledge and the wisdom of CEOs influence the internationalization behaviour of SMEs?

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative study is used. Longitudinal case studies of two Swedish life science companies are analysed.

Findings

An individual's prior experiential knowledge influence the newly started SME's market commitments and internationalization behaviour. Such prior experiences can enable early and rapid resource commitments in the newly started SMEs. Relying upon such prior experiential knowledge in deciding upon the company's market commitments however heightens the risk of superstitious learning. The findings illustrate how wisdom can work as an antidote to superstitious learning. Wisdom lures even experienced CEOs away from believing they know more than they actually know.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to extend the Uppsala model by incorporating the role of individual-level experiential knowledge. The study also adds value to the literature on small firm internationalization by providing propositions for how the prior knowledge of individual key decision makers influences SMEs' internationalization behaviour. The propositions provide new input to the ongoing discussion in the literature and help to guide future research.

Originality/value

Given the fact that the Uppsala model is centred upon a firm-level view on experiential knowledge, our theoretical understanding is still limited regarding how individual-level experiential knowledge influences the internationalization behaviour of SMEs. This study addresses calls for research on how individuals' prior knowledge influences small-firm internationalization.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Simona Karbouniaris, Alie Weerman, Bea Dunnewind, Jean Pierre Wilken and Tineke A. Abma

This study aims to explore the perspectives of mental health professionals who are in a process of integrating their own experiential knowledge in their professional role…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perspectives of mental health professionals who are in a process of integrating their own experiential knowledge in their professional role. This study considers implications for identity, dilemmas and challenges within the broader organization, when bringing experiential knowledge to practice.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a participatory action research approach, qualitative methods have been used, such as in-depth interviews, discussions and observations during training and project team.

Findings

The actual use of experiential knowledge by mental health care professionals in their work affected four levels: their personal–professional development; the relation with service users; the relation with colleagues; and their position in the organization.

Research limitations/implications

Because of its limited context, this study may lack generalisability and further research with regard to psychologists and psychiatrists, as well as perceptions from users, is desirable.

Social implications

According to this study, social change starts from a bottom-up movement and synchronously should be facilitated by top-down policy. A dialogue with academic mental health professionals seems crucial to integrate this source of knowledge. Active collaboration with peer workers and supervisors is desired as well.

Originality/value

Professionals with lived experiences play an important role in working recovery-oriented, demonstrating bravery and resilience. Having dealt with mental health distress, they risked stigma and rejections when introducing this as a type of knowledge in current mental health service culture. Next to trainings to facilitate the personal–professional process, investments in the entire organization are needed to transform governance, policy and ethics.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Dhouha Jaziri and Raouf Ahmad Rather

This chapter renews the thought on conceptualizing customer experience (CX) through the perspective of customer knowledge management (CKM). It bridges two pathways: Tacit…

Abstract

This chapter renews the thought on conceptualizing customer experience (CX) through the perspective of customer knowledge management (CKM). It bridges two pathways: Tacit Knowledge and Lived experience of the customer. Hence, refreshing the CX conceptualization aims to grasp the depths of the in situ service lived experience by examining the tacit knowledge forms issued from the lived experience of the client-curist in the well-being tourism. Dealing primarily with the consumption of service experience into the thalassotherapy centers is already an uphill task. This is due to its subtle and embedded experiential nature. Notwithstanding these challenges, it offers substantial knowledge about the conceptualized customer experiential knowledge (CEK). Hence, a generation of a pool of items measuring the customer experiential knowledge-process competence construct (CEK-PC) comes to begin the empirical development of the customer experiential knowledge management (CEKM) approach (as developed by Jaziri, 2013, 2019a). It also offers empirical evidence that corroborates CEK conceptualization (Jaziri-Bouagina, 2017). Through the CEK-PC, this chapter explores the competence of management levels in adopting a phenomenological vision and a global approach of ethnography to acquire CEK for treating, sharing, and using it to implement an experience-based innovation. The thrust of the construct was preserved via the Q-sort technique that has assessed the content validity through two sorting rounds. Forty-two items are retained representing a first step of the measure development.

Details

Contemporary Approaches Studying Customer Experience in Tourism Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-632-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2018

Sudip K. Tiwari and Tor Korneliussen

Relying on the theoretical lens of a knowledge-based view, the purpose of this study is to explore the sources and roles of experiential knowledge in the rapid…

1162

Abstract

Purpose

Relying on the theoretical lens of a knowledge-based view, the purpose of this study is to explore the sources and roles of experiential knowledge in the rapid internationalisation of an emerging market-based micro export firms (EMMFs).

Design/methodology/approach

This is an inductive theory building study, which attempts to understand the “how” and “why” questions. In so doing, the study used nine micro export firms operating in the handicrafts sector of Nepal.

Findings

The findings suggest that internationalisation of resource-poor EMMFs relies on the entrepreneurs’ experiential knowledge, which is mainly acquired through prior experience, social networks and participation in international trade-fairs.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes by formulating a number of propositions on the sources and roles of experiential knowledge, which could be tested in pursuit of theory building on micro firms’ internationalisation based in emerging markets.

Originality/value

The paper advances an understanding on the patterns of firms’ internationalisation, and discusses EMMFs’ possibilities to emerge as a faster internationalising firm, so-called “born globals”.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Preecha Chaochotechuang, Farhad Daneshgar and Stefania Mariano

The purpose of this paper is to advance knowledge by exploring how small and medium enterprises (SMEs) search for external knowledge in their open innovation processes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance knowledge by exploring how small and medium enterprises (SMEs) search for external knowledge in their open innovation processes, and how the search can be advanced.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research employs a qualitative multiple case study design. A literature review of open innovation in SMEs and external knowledge search is used to build the premises of this study. Semi-structured interviews with eight SMEs are employed to collect subsequent exploratory empirical data.

Findings

This exploratory study revealed that SMEs adopted a combination of cognitive and experiential search heuristics where cognitive search was practiced during the innovation research process when searching for external knowledge, whilst experiential search was practiced during the innovation development process. Concerning the search space, this study found that SMEs mainly explored local knowledge, and occasionally pursued distant knowledge when confronted with complex problems. The reason for the above behavior was explained to be related to the reduction of costs and risks associated with innovation activities.

Originality/value

External knowledge plays a pivotal role in open innovation. Although extant studies have shed some light on how large firms search for external knowledge, however, it is not clear how SMEs search for external knowledge. Moreover, this study focuses on learning about both the search space and the search heuristics at both the research and the development stages of the innovation process.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Beatrice Ietto, Federica Pascucci and Gian Luca Gregori

This paper aims to develop a theoretical framework for the conceptualization of customer experiential knowledge (CEK) by logically combining its different dimensions into…

1125

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a theoretical framework for the conceptualization of customer experiential knowledge (CEK) by logically combining its different dimensions into one coherent explanatory concept. Drawing on the integration of the literature on customer experience, customer knowledge management and customer insights acquisition, supported by adequate empirical evidence, the framework provides a systematic, comprehensive and accurate understanding of CEK which, could contribute to the identification of relevant customer experience insights useful for customer knowledge management.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis follows an inductive/deductive interpretative approach and it is based on a netnography of specialty coffee bloggers’ narratives in relation to their sustainability practices.

Findings

The paper identifies the following six types of CEK: normative, subcultural, epicurean, transcendental, subcultural and symbolic. Accordingly, CEK is defined as the knowledge tacitly possessed by customers in relation to how they live their consumption experiences according to a body of heterogeneous socio-cultural contextual factors (ethos, norms and symbols) and subjective influences (emotions, ingenuity, instincts and senses) deeply embedded into the narrative of a consumption experience.

Originality/value

While CEK has been largely observed and acknowledged, it has not been yet adequately addressed by existing research. The provision of a conceptual definition of CEK which emphasizes its different dimensions will be of use to both academics and practitioners to better identify and categorize the different manifestations of CEK when undertaking empirical observations or managerial decisions.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 July 2014

To examine the impacts experiential learning can have on student learning in and out of the classroom. Models of experiential learning are presented including the…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the impacts experiential learning can have on student learning in and out of the classroom. Models of experiential learning are presented including the experiential learning theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The historical roots of experiential learning are reviewed before a new experiential learning theory is presented, VAKT-enhanced, to demonstrate the many unique paths that learners take toward content learning, retention, and synthesis.

Findings

Apprenticeship experience is universally recognized as an effective method of learning; we learn from doing. Yet, the field of literacy has maintained for decades that reading skills must be taught, often carried out in a drill fashion, also known as the proverbial skill-and-drill technique

Practical implications

A multisensory approach that involves experiencing literature through hands-on and e-learning environments can promote reading acquisition efficiently, bridging the gap between diverse student bodies. Students must be rejuvenated to become interested or maintain interest in literacy, and using technology and experiential learning should be of central focus.

Details

Theoretical Models of Learning and Literacy Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-821-1

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Shimri Hadas Grundman, Neta Edri and Renana Stanger Elran

This paper aims to present a working model for using experiential knowledge in the work of lived experience practitioners within the mental health field.

201

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a working model for using experiential knowledge in the work of lived experience practitioners within the mental health field.

Design/methodology/approach

The working model is constructed from three key elements, namely, components of lived experience, the Library of Life Experiences and the NISE technique for sharing experiential knowledge (NISE: need identification; inner identification; sharing experiential knowledge and interpersonal encounter).

Findings

The model will be described, followed by central themes that emerged from a pilot course that was taught in Israel in 2019 to a group of peers working in the mental health system. The central themes were: developing peer identity; sharing peer language; internalizing the working model; understanding the peer role; and awakening social consciousness.

Originality/value

The original working model and training course were co-produced and co-conducted by peer specialists and mental health professionals, for the use of lived experience practitioners.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Reijo Savolainen

To specify the nature of experiential information by examining how such information is articulated and shared in online discussion.

Abstract

Purpose

To specify the nature of experiential information by examining how such information is articulated and shared in online discussion.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiential information is approached by identifying two constitutive aspects: (1) sensory information that an individual obtains from noticeable events lived through by means of human senses such as sight and touch and (2) cognitive–affective information that is indicative of how the individual interprets such events by means of cognitive operations like comparison and evaluation, as well as appraises the affective valence of such events. To examine the nature of experiential information, an empirical study was made by analysing how people articulate sensory and cognitive–affective information in online discussion about the COVID-19 epidemic. To this end, a sample of 1773 messages posted to the online forum hosted by the Canadian Broadcasting Company was scrutinized by means of descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Experiential information was mainly articulated in the depiction of visual observations of lived-through events, as well as in their comparison and evaluation. Experiential information was often articulated in conjunction with information of other types, most notably topic-related opinions, neutral descriptions of COVID-19 related issues and suggestions offered to fellow participants.

Research limitations/implications

As the study concentrated on the sharing of experiential information about the COVID-19 epidemic in an online discussion forum, the findings cannot be extended to concern the exchange of experiential information in other contexts.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to characterize empirically the nature of experiential information by examining the articulations of online discussants.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 78 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Faye Q. Miller

The purpose of this paper is to provide an emerging framework for university libraries’ research and reference services, which aims to strengthen partnerships between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an emerging framework for university libraries’ research and reference services, which aims to strengthen partnerships between research information specialists and early career researchers (ECRs).

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model used in this paper was originally developed from a constructivist grounded theory study, analyzing data from a sample of ECRs across multiple disciplines at two universities and contextualized by a review of recent research into ECRs’ information experiences, and researcher–librarian partnerships in experiential learning spaces within and beyond libraries.

Findings

This paper provides a review of the literature on one aspect of the knowledge ecosystem model relevant to research information specialists: tangible forms of information such as texts, tools, humans, cultures and environments encountered during informal learning experiences in six spaces: professional development programs, formal coursework, events, community, home and social media.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a catalyst for discussions and research into how research information specialists can facilitate access to the forms of information and learning experienced by ECRs, and what research information specialists can do with tangible information to respond to ECRs needs for experiential learning.

Practical implications

As the previous study found that ECRs perceived their knowledge as vital resources toward their research career progression, it would be useful for research information specialists to understand and design services paying attention to the importance of ECRs’ initial encounters with tangible information to create the knowledge they need.

Social implications

Working toward improved engagement and partnership through increased awareness and understanding of informed learning experiences between ECRs, their mentors and other developers and research librarians/information specialists can result in higher quality development and communication of new research, which can impact on society’s innovation and advancement.

Originality/value

The new integrative framework presented in this paper can assist in terms of identifying what informs ECRs professional development toward strengthening ECR and librarian/information specialist partnerships.

1 – 10 of over 19000