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1 – 10 of over 18000
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Geetika Varshneya, Gopal Das and Arpita Khare

The purpose of this paper is to review the academic literature on the experiential value to appreciate the developments in the area in the last decade; propose a…

3286

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the academic literature on the experiential value to appreciate the developments in the area in the last decade; propose a conceptual framework delineating the determinants and outcomes of experiential value and provide future research directions based on the insights.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of online databases were searched to review and select the papers related to experiential value. The full text of each of the papers was taken as a unit of analysis. The classification and coding of all the selected papers was performed manually by two independent researchers.

Findings

The analysis led to the classification of the experiential value literature broadly into five categories, i.e. conceptualization, measurement, antecedents, outcomes and applications. The findings indicated that the experiential value delineates across cultures, store formats, channels and product categories. The proposed framework depicting antecedents and outcomes could form a basis for future studies. The study unveiled several other useful findings as discussed in the paper.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may be generalized only to the selected online databases for the given time period in the experiential value domain. The study identified several potential avenues for future research.

Practical implications

The present study may help the academicians and practitioners to comprehend the current state of literature. The bibliography may be considered as a ready reference for contemplating future research in the area.

Originality/value

The extant literature revealed that no study so far has captured a literature review in the area of experiential value. Thus, this could be seen as a unique and significant contribution to the literature.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2022

Claire Roederer and Marc Filser

Based on a “Fill-the-Bottle” (FTB) challenge, this research explores how experiential design can help cause-related marketing. This study aims to show that experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a “Fill-the-Bottle” (FTB) challenge, this research explores how experiential design can help cause-related marketing. This study aims to show that experiences designed as anti-structural and anti-functional can raise awareness through action.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors study a corpus of 52 introspective journals and 60 pictures about the challenge, which entails filling empty bottles with cigarette butts from the streets as quickly as possible, then sharing pictures of the bottles on social media.

Findings

The anti-structural design of the experience activates the participants’ experiential system, and the social interactions between the participants and pedestrians construct meaning for the experience. The results further indicate that as follows: individuals’ frames of reference can explain whether they perceive the experience as liberatory or stochastic; anti-structural design can serve cause-related marketing by focusing on three stages: doing, showing and sharing; and experiential marketing can serve societal and social causes.

Research limitations/implications

This research involved a single field. Further research with more heterogeneous participants would be insightful. The power of experiential marketing to serve meaningful and collective causes should be encouraged. Further research should be conducted to understand and conceptualize these collective attempts to fight the dark sides of consumption.

Practical implications

In line with Pine and Gilmore’s (1999) advice to stage memorable experiences by working cautiously on cues, the FTB challenge analysis indicates that by focusing on material evidence and staging a specific sequence of doing something about it, showing everyone what is being done and expanding visibility by sharing artifacts of the action on social media, one can actually make people think about and remember the action.

Social implications

The “do-show-share” design that the FTB challenge uses can be relevant for many cause-related marketing efforts because it operates on both individual and collective levels.

Originality/value

This research offers a new perspective on experiential marketing by studying how experiences designed to be anti-structural can renew social, cause-related marketing tools.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Babak Taheri, Thomas Farrington, Keith Gori, Gill Hogg and Kevin D. O’Gorman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between consumer motivations, their interactions with hospitality spaces and experiential outcomes. Enhancing…

1039

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between consumer motivations, their interactions with hospitality spaces and experiential outcomes. Enhancing consumer experience is of clear interest to industry professionals. This quantitative study explores the impact of escapism and entitlement to leisure upon involvement in liminoid consumptions spaces, thereby contributing a theory of liminoid motivators within commercial hospitality.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a quantitative methodology, using a survey of a sample of student nightclubbers in the UK. Data are analysed through Partial Least Squares.

Findings

Hospitality consumers are positively affected by the feelings of increased involvement experienced in consumption spaces that exhibit liminoid characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Surveys involve potential for error regarding respondents’ ability to agree with questionnaire statements. Data collection was conducted in Scotland, and so, results may not be generalised to other commercial hospitality spaces outside of Scotland.

Practical implications

Hospitality consumers become more involved, and thereby more satisfied, in liminoid consumption spaces when motivated by escapism and entitlement to leisure. Attending to the liminoid motivators that drive consumers away from work and domesticity, and towards commercial hospitality spaces, will go some way towards creating the desired consumer experience.

Originality/value

This is the first quantitative study to investigate consumer motivations to escape and entitlement to leisure as antecedents of involvement in a commercial hospitality context. It develops a theory of hospitality consumption using the liminoid anthropological concept.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Pilar Pazos, María Carmen Pérez-López and María José González-López

Although the importance of teamwork competencies and effective conflict management in entrepreneurship education is recognised, we have limited knowledge of how these…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the importance of teamwork competencies and effective conflict management in entrepreneurship education is recognised, we have limited knowledge of how these factors interact to influence performance in entrepreneurial teams. This research explores teamwork competencies as a predictor of entrepreneurial team performance and the moderating effect of emerging cognitive and interpersonal team conflict as levers in entrepreneurship learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged survey method was used to collect data from 49 teams (156 individuals) of undergraduate students in an experiential new venture creation course. A predictive model of entrepreneurial team performance through hierarchical regression analyses and moderated-moderation analyses was tested.

Findings

Results reveal that teamwork competencies have a significant and direct influence on entrepreneurial team performance and that intragroup conflict strengthens that relationship when high levels of cognitive conflict and low levels of interpersonal conflict emerge.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the design of entrepreneurial training programs, which will benefit from interventions aimed at teamwork competency development that incorporate strategies promoting constructive cognitive conflict while preventing the emergence of interpersonal conflict.

Originality/value

This study is a step forward in entrepreneurship education research from the perspective of social and interpersonal processes by identifying the patterns of intra-team conflict that lead to more effective entrepreneurial teams and more productive use of teamwork competencies in a learning-by-doing entrepreneurial context.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 64 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Babak Taheri, Shahab Pourfakhimi, Girish Prayag, Martin J. Gannon and Jörg Finsterwalder

This study aims to investigate whether the antecedents of co-creation influence braggart word-of-mouth (WoM) in a participative leisure context, theorising the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether the antecedents of co-creation influence braggart word-of-mouth (WoM) in a participative leisure context, theorising the concept of co-created food well-being and highlighting implications for interactive experience co-design.

Design/methodology/approach

A sequential mixed-method approach was used to test a theoretical model; 25 in-depth interviews with cooking class participants were conducted, followed by a post-experience survey (n = 575).

Findings

Qualitative results suggest braggart WoM is rooted in active consumer participation in co-designing leisure experiences. The structural model confirms that participation in value co-creating activities (i.e. co-design, customer-to-customer (C2C) interaction), alongside perceived support from service providers, increases consumer perceptions of co-creation and stimulates braggart WoM. Degree of co-creation and support from peers mediate some relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Limited by cross-sectional data from one experiential consumption format, the results nevertheless demonstrate the role of active participation in co-design and C2C interactions during value co-creation. This implies that co-created and co-designed leisure experiences can intensify post-consumption behaviours and potentially enhance food well-being.

Practical implications

The results highlight that integrating customer participation into service design, while also developing opportunities for peer support on-site, can stimulate braggart WoM.

Originality/value

Extends burgeoning literature on co-creation and co-design in leisure services. By encouraging active customer participation while providing support and facilitating C2C interactions, service providers can enhance value co-creation, influencing customer experiences and food well-being. Accordingly, the concept of co-created food well-being is introduced.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Maureen Maguire Lewis

To explain why cross‐cultural negotiations simulations are an excellent, active, and dramatic means of training employees to be culturally adaptable and literate.

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Abstract

Purpose

To explain why cross‐cultural negotiations simulations are an excellent, active, and dramatic means of training employees to be culturally adaptable and literate.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a discussion of how drama plays an important role in creating learning that lasts, and by comparing passive, traditional classroom training with active, hands‐on, experiential learning. The paper discusses the high value cross‐cultural simulations in training employees to be culturally adaptable and literate.

Findings

Provides an explanation of how and why the dramatic elements of international business can and should be incorporated into cross‐cultural simulations and how those elements can dramatically enhance learning.

Research limitations/implications

It is not a detailed step‐by‐step discussion of how each of the author's simulations has been researched and written. It does, however, discuss the overall role that drama plays in creating and designing simulations that work well.

Practical implications

In creating educational material for the workplace and the classroom, these methods of adding drama to training materials, such as simulations, should enable trainers to realize that opportunities for creating learning that lasts are abundant and easily available.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a unique way of making simulations provide experiential context to training events.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Christina Donnelly, Geoff Simmons, Gillian Armstrong and Andrew Fearne

Retailer loyalty card marketing intelligence presents actual customer purchasing preferences, competitor activities and performance. Typically, extant literature implies…

5745

Abstract

Purpose

Retailer loyalty card marketing intelligence presents actual customer purchasing preferences, competitor activities and performance. Typically, extant literature implies that larger firms with formal marketing planning approaches will be more able to leverage it, structured as it is within a formalized statistical format. Small business literature on the other hand emphasizes their more informal approach to marketing planning. The purpose of this paper is to consider, for the first time, the potential relationship between retailer loyalty card marketing intelligence and small business market orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed which diagrammatically interprets how retailer loyalty card marketing intelligence can relate to small business market orientation. Propositions provide a basis for further discussion with applied and research implications.

Findings

A pertinent aspect of the conceptualization is the role of small business owner‐manager insight and intuition within an experiential learning context. A complementary relationship is posited in the leveraging of retailer loyalty card marketing intelligence to enhance small business market orientation, which with higher levels of entrepreneurship orientation can lead to positive organizational outcomes, such as facilitating more successful and informed engagement with larger suppliers.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the increasing pressure small businesses face in dealing with retailer loyalty card marketing intelligence. Generally, literature has yet to adequately address marketing planning implications for firms. The informal/formal tension when considering small businesses presents a particularly interesting area of conceptual development, integrating market orientation literature and also recent developments which point to interaction between market and entrepreneurship orientations. This paper therefore provides a basis for a new small business research agenda in an area which is highly topical and important, with a synthesis of the extant literature in developing a conceptualization and propositions. The conceptualization and propositions can facilitate the development of new research and thinking in this potentially fruitful area of future enquiry.

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Ingrid Y. Lin

Among the many studies relating to servicescapes, the emphasis has mainly been on the effect of specific environmental attributes on customer perceptions, emotions and…

5527

Abstract

Purpose

Among the many studies relating to servicescapes, the emphasis has mainly been on the effect of specific environmental attributes on customer perceptions, emotions and behaviors. Many servicescape studies have not included visual servicescape aesthetics and the overall significance that visual aesthetics hold for a particular consumer in his or her relationship with the servicescape. Yet, servicescape appearance represents the central channel for the formation of consumer–product (e.g. servicescape) relationships. Limited studies have examined consumers’ visual servicescape aesthetics comprehension and appreciation (VSACA) or consumers’ relationship with a specific servicescape and how consumers evaluate a servicescape from a visual aesthetics perspective. This study aims to operationalize and measure VSACA and to examine the validity of a proposed comprehensive model that encompasses the direct effects of VSACA on perceived perceptual experience quality (PPEQ), pleasure and arousal; PPEQ, pleasure and arousal on satisfaction; satisfaction on willingness to pay more; and the mediation effects of PPEQ, pleasure and arousal on the relationship between VSACA and satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an experimental design study with two treatments. Fictitious boutique hotel lobby and classic hotel lobby video clips were created with the appropriate manipulation of visual aesthetics attributes. A random sample of 600 individuals over the age of 18 was drawn from a nationwide (USA) list purchased from a third-party commercial list service. After preliminary analysis, about 12 per cent were eliminated because of unusable responses or missing data. The data from 550 participants were used in the final analyses – 218 males and 332 females. Participants were asked to view a video clip of a hotel lobby online. After viewing the video clip, subjects completed an online survey instrument. The hypothesized model was then tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results of this study suggest that individuals’ VSACA directly influences their PPEQ, pleasure and arousal. PPEQ and pleasure also directly influence satisfaction and indirectly mediate the relationship between VSACA and satisfaction. Finally, satisfaction directly affects willingness to pay more. Additional new findings are also discussed in the paper.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by focusing primarily on the individuals’ VSACA of a hotel lobby; non-visual components were not considered as part of the VSACA construct. Results should, therefore, be generalized to other similar settings with caution. Future research can integrate both visual and non-visual servicescape aesthetics comprehension and develop a new scale to measure them. Future research can also build on the support of the current proposed theoretical model by testing it in different service contexts and across different groups of participants.

Practical implications

This research provides evidence to hotel service providers that VSACA plays an important role in influencing consumers’ emotions, satisfaction and behavioral intentions. The results imply that understanding customers’ simultaneous cognitive-emotional processing of servicescape aesthetics is crucial. Hotel developers and managers can engage potential customers in the designing and planning of a servicescape by conducting focus group research prior to the actual implementation of the servicescape attributes and construction.

Originality/value

This study represents the first research to extend and investigate the concept of visual aesthetics comprehension in the context of the hotel lobby servicescape beyond just product goods. This study contributes to the services marketing literature by confirming the importance and powerful direct effects of VSACA on individuals’ PPEQ, pleasure, arousal and willingness to pay more. Moreover, PPEQ and pleasure mediate the relationship between VSACA and overall satisfaction.

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Shona Morse

The aim of this paper is to give a critical assessment of a study designed to investigate the potential of a new method for teaching HRD students about performance…

1743

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to give a critical assessment of a study designed to investigate the potential of a new method for teaching HRD students about performance appraisal. It is argued that this approach is in the vanguard of developments in IT and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an explorative study which is undertaken in the context of a virtual world setting.

Findings

There is potential value added for HRD teaching and learning using virtual world technology. Subjects identified strengths and weaknesses in their use of Second Life© for performance appraisal skills training. Importantly, there was some evidence that subjects emotionally identified with their online characters, with potential implications for the impact of training. Necessary adjustments to research methods are identified.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small scale study. Initial enquiry will inform larger scale research.

Practical implications

The model gives HRD students scope to practice different roles in performance appraisal and, in the longer term, to experiment with “ways of being”. Subjects could be mentored during their engagement in the appraisal process, enabling active tutoring for skill development. Also, a variety of teaching strategies could be employed such as exploring cultural aspects and engaging students in peer‐to‐peer teaching.

Originality/value

The paper presents an innovative method, blending IT with a more conventional training concept, role‐play.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2017

Anne-Marie Lebrun, Che-Jen Su, Jean-Luc Lhéraud, Antoine Marsac and Patrick Bouchet

This chapter compares two protected natural parks as specific experiential contexts providing two different experiences for visitors: extraordinary and memorable versus

Abstract

This chapter compares two protected natural parks as specific experiential contexts providing two different experiences for visitors: extraordinary and memorable versus ordinary and mundane (Carù & Cova, 2006, 2007). Each experiential context enables the distinction of actual visitors’ experiences (Pine & Gilmore, 1999) inside each park. A qualitative study collected information to differentiate each protected natural park based on three dimensions: the geophysical environment, the recreational practices, and product and service offer management. A quantitative study analyzed the effect of a specific experiential context through a comparison of actual visitors’ experiences on four dimensions (esthetics, escapism, education, and entertainment) in both countries (500 in each country). Results of the qualitative study show that the Taiwanese park provides an experiential context with more extraordinary and memorable experiences while the French park provides an experiential context with more ordinary and mundane experiences. The results of the quantitative study show the distinction of actual visitors’ experiences inside each park: more immersion through esthetics and escapism in Taiwan and more absorption through education and entertainment in France. Each park manager has to build one’s own positioning and should offer a unique experiential context based on the three dimensions to provide more extraordinary and memorable or more ordinary and mundane experiences. this study highlights the interest of an analysis framework of experiences adapted from Carù and Cova (2006, 2007) and Pine and Gilmore (1999) underlining the link between experiential context and actual experiences.

Details

Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-690-7

Keywords

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