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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2016

Magdalena Petronella (Nellie) Swart

The relevance of the use of business models in the measurement of tourist experience has been questioned. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to suggest a…

Abstract

Purpose

The relevance of the use of business models in the measurement of tourist experience has been questioned. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to suggest a theoretical framework for the development of a multi-item Business Tourist Experience Value Model.

Methodology/approach

Against the Behavioural Intentions Model of Fishbein and Ajzen (1975), an alternative Business Tourist Experience Value theoretical model is suggested. This model consists of an integration and re-assessment of different elements from a range of empirical studies.

Findings

Experiential value, satisfaction, and post-consumption behavior may play an important role in acquiring information and knowledge creation on how business tourism organizations can use a Business Tourist Experience Value model to enhance service experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the explorative nature of the Business Tourist Experience Value theoretical model, more empirical studies are needed to investigate, test and validate the model.

Practical implications

Results from the theoretical discussion support the inclusion of experiential value, satisfaction, and post-consumption behavior as part of the Business Tourist Experience Value model. Due to the magnitude of the relationships among these dimensions it is expected that the theoretical and practical implications may complement each other. Therefore business tourism managers can use these dimensions as guidelines on how to create valuable experiences for their tourists and perform better.

Originality/value

This theoretical model offers new practices into business tourism managers’ measurement of experiential value, satisfaction, and post-consumption behavior in a business tourism context.

Details

The Handbook of Managing and Marketing Tourism Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-289-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2022

Philipp “Phil” Klaus and Annalisa Tarquini-Poli

This study aims to address the need to empirically investigate the luxury customer service experiences of the ultra-high-net-worth individual (UHNWI) segment by conducting…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the need to empirically investigate the luxury customer service experiences of the ultra-high-net-worth individual (UHNWI) segment by conducting and analyzing interviews with 20 clients flying private jets. The results lead to a conceptualization of the UHNW private aviation customer experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied a three-step method to explore the meaning and domain of the UHNWI luxury service experience. First, the perception and corresponding attributes of customers’ experiences using private aviation services were examined through 20 in-depth interviews and by using the soft laddering technique. Second, this study coded and, subsequently, purified the data by means of a systematic comparison approach and hierarchical coding. Third, a panel of judges, using the emerging consensus technique, scrutinized and validated the emerging dimensions.

Findings

The analysis reveals the customer experience (CX) and motivations differ significantly between business and leisure use, moving from a functional toward an experiential value focus. The findings emphasize the lack of social value for the UHNWI CX and introduce time as a new value dimension.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides multiple contributions to the customer experience, luxury and luxury services literature. This study enhances scholarly understandings of the holistic UHNWI CX in the context of an absolute luxury offering, thus providing a needed conceptualization of an underresearched customer segment, namely, the UHNWI. It delivers insights on the different motivations and experience UHNWI are seeking for according to the context. This study proposes a new luxury value dimension: time.

Practical implications

This study highlights multiple opportunities for UHNWI customer experience improvement. The findings reveal that different clients are looking for different experiences in terms of business versus leisure use. The key drivers and expectations shift from functional (price/availability/flexibility) to experiential factors (comfort/onboard experience/relationship with crew and pilot). Communication, marketing and CX management strategies and tactics need to emphasize this important distinction regarding what drives client behavior in the private aviation setting.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is threefold. First, it defines UHNWI characteristics and overall experiences using the unique über-service of private aviation, thus advancing scholarly understanding of both the luxury customer and the luxury customer service experience beyond the proposed traditional drivers of luxury consumption. Second, this study expands the conceptual foundation for the UHNWI “über-luxury” service experience, which, given the importance of the UHNWI segment, is important. Third, this study contributes to theoretical knowledge by extending customer value perception in the luxury context by introducing the luxury value dimension of time. This study concludes with a discussion of its findings’ implications for luxury research and practice, providing a future research agenda with regard to UHNW.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Alexander Preko, George Kofi Amoako, Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku and John Kosiba

Digital tourism has drawn the attention of researchers around the globe. This study aims to assess the digital tourism experience for tourist site revisit from an emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital tourism has drawn the attention of researchers around the globe. This study aims to assess the digital tourism experience for tourist site revisit from an emerging market perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Anchored on the social cognitive theory, the study employed a quantitative method, using the convenience sampling to select 328 participants who responded to tourism and technology sharing items through an online questionnaire. The study's hypotheses were tested utilizing structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results suggest a significant influence of technology-based service innovativeness on service value, tourist site revisits and experience sharing through technology. Further, the findings also revealed the significant influence of service value on tourist site revisit and experience-sharing through technology.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted with only clients or tourists, and this limits generalization of the study's findings.

Practical implications

The study offers the understanding of how tourist site operators and all stakeholders have to deploy new ways of technology-based service innovation to get maximum return on their investment in the hospitality industry.

Originality/value

The outcome of this research advanced the linkage between technology and tourism in context, which is important to policymakers and practitioners in the sector.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Yasin Sahhar and Raymond Loohuis

This paper aims to explore how unreflective and reflective value experience emerges in value co-creation and co-destruction practices in a consumer context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how unreflective and reflective value experience emerges in value co-creation and co-destruction practices in a consumer context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a Heideggerian phenomenological heuristic consisting of three interrelated modes of engagement, which is used for interpretive sense-making in a dynamic and lively case context of amateur-level football (soccer) played on artificial grass. Based on a qualitative study using ethnographic techniques, this study examines the whats and the hows of value experience by individuals playing football at different qualities and in varying conditions across 25 Dutch football teams.

Findings

The findings reveal three interrelated yet distinct modalities of experience in value co-creation and co-destruction presented in a continuum of triplex spaces of unreflective and reflective value experience. The first is a joyful flow of unreflective value experience in emergent and undisrupted value co-creation practice with no potential for value co-destruction. Second, a semireflective value experience caused by interruptions in value co-creation has a higher potential for value co-destruction. Third, a fully reflective value experience through a completely interrupted value co-creation practice results in high-value co-destruction.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the literature on the microfoundations of value experience and value creation by proposing a conceptual relationship between unreflective/reflective value experience and value co-creation and co-destruction mediated through interruptions in consumer usage situations.

Practical implications

This study’s novel perspective on this relationship offers practitioners a useful vantage point on understanding how enhanced value experience comes about in value co-creation practice and how this is linked to value co-destruction when interruptions occur. These insights help bolster alignment and prevent misalignment in resource integration and foster service strategies, designs and innovations to better influence consumer experience in journeys.

Originality/value

This study deploys an integral view of how consumer value experience manifests in value co-creation and co-destruction that offers conceptual, methodological and practical clarity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Aline Höpner, Stefânia Ordovás de Almeida and Vinícius Sittoni Brasil

This study aims to propose a framework for understanding the construction of extraordinary consumer experiences in events from a multidimensional and longitudinal value

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a framework for understanding the construction of extraordinary consumer experiences in events from a multidimensional and longitudinal value perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The main research site was the Rock in Rio Brazil VI festival, an extraordinary consumption experience. The study takes a phenomenological interpretative approach, for which input was obtained using multiple data collection techniques (in-depth interviews, diaries and photographs) in a longitudinal study that took place over 18 months. The study also includes the first author’s observations and interactions with the event organizer and its partners during the same period, and post-pandemic complementary data that were collected in 2021.

Findings

The research findings demonstrate the integrative potential of concepts and theories that are analysed in the light of a longitudinal perspective for understanding value formation for consumers in their experience of extraordinary events. It also indicates that the construction of experience involves a high level of interaction and a high degree of engagement with the consumer in order to foster the development of an affective relationship between the service provider and the user that is based on a co-created experience.

Originality/value

The study answers call for more research into understanding consumer value, and how it is created, delivered and developed over time (Helkkula et al., 2012). It also expands our understanding of consumption experiences and the consumer journey (Lemon and Verhoef, 2016). It encourages longitudinal qualitative studies to be carried out and analyses value in the consumption experience in the field of events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Nkosinathi Sithole, Gillian Sullivan Mort and Clare D'Souza

This paper aims to examine customer experience value orchestrated by non-banks' financial touchpoints to understand how they enhance the financial inclusion of low-income…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine customer experience value orchestrated by non-banks' financial touchpoints to understand how they enhance the financial inclusion of low-income consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two independent but related studies were conducted using qualitative comparative analyses (QCA) research design with semi-structured interviews to compare and contrast customer experience value at two rural locations in Southern Africa. The interview transcripts were analysed using ATLAS.ti, which is a powerful operating system for analysing qualitative data.

Findings

The results indicate that non-banks in the two countries design financial services that include functional, economic, humanic, social and mechanic customer experience value dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

The data for this study was collected from financial services customers of retailers and mobile phone network operators in only one research setting in each country. Further research could extend the comparative context for qualitative studies across similar markets. Other limitations are discussed in the paper.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the body of knowledge by highlighting the salient and germane dimensions and components found to be important in understanding financial inclusion using customer experience value. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that incorporates customer experience value dimensions in understanding the financial inclusion of low-income consumers at the base of the social and economic pyramid in emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2018

Hanna Komulainen, Saila Saraniemi, Pauliina Ulkuniemi and Marianne Ylilehto

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the customer value experience conveys the restructuring of the service network in the banking industry. The banking sector has…

1196

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the customer value experience conveys the restructuring of the service network in the banking industry. The banking sector has often been one of the early adopters of IT in terms of connecting their services and customers. While developing digital services, however, banks are also concerned that they are losing contact with their customers. At the same time, fast developing technologies enable new companies to enter the industry to offer their services. As a result, the service supply chains in the banking industry appear to be restructured.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data were collected by using a qualitative method of focus groups and interviews with end-users of banking services.

Findings

According to findings, customers value a holistic approach to the services, and such a holistic value cannot necessarily be provided by a single banking service provider because the ecosystem around such services is becoming more complex.

Practical implications

Service supply chains need to be restructured based on the end-customer value experience.

Originality/value

This study contributes to value research and especially to the discussion in service experiences by addressing some of the disruptions happening at the industry level. The paper shows that the focus should be on customer value because banks should understand that their services are not enough for the customers—they are only seen as banks, not as providers of the holistic value that is required from the customer’s point of view.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Bertil Hultén

The purpose of this paper is to present the multi‐sensory brand‐experience concept in relation to the human mind and senses. It also seeks to propose a sensory marketing…

38719

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the multi‐sensory brand‐experience concept in relation to the human mind and senses. It also seeks to propose a sensory marketing (SM) model of the multi‐sensory brand‐experience hypothesis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies exploratory and explanatory approaches to investigating the multi‐sensory brand‐experience concept within the context of discovery. The qualitative study is built on primary and secondary data sources, including personal interviews with experts and managers.

Findings

The multi‐sensory brand‐experience hypothesis suggests that firms should apply sensorial strategies and three explanatory levels within an SM model. It allows firms through means as sensors, sensations, and sensory expressions to differentiate and position a brand in the human mind as image.

Research limitations/implications

A theoretical implication is that the multi‐sensory brand‐experience hypothesis emphasizes the significance of the human mind and senses in value‐generating processes. Another theoretical implication is that the hypothesis illustrates the shortcomings of the transaction and relationship marketing models in considering the multi‐sensory brand‐experience concept. It is worth conducting additional research on the multi‐sensory interplay between the human senses in value‐generating processes.

Practical implications

The findings offer additional insights to managers on the multi‐sensory brand‐experience concept. This research opens up opportunities for managers to identify emotional/psychological linkages in differentiating, distinguishing and positioning a brand as an image in the human mind.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this research lies in developing the multi‐sensory brand‐experience hypothesis within a SM model. It fills a major gap in the marketing literature and research in stressing the need to rethink conventional marketing models.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Yuri Seo, Carol Kelleher and Roderick J. Brodie

While extant service-centric research has largely focussed on managerial advantages, few studies have addressed how brand engagement emerges in the broader context of…

1043

Abstract

Purpose

While extant service-centric research has largely focussed on managerial advantages, few studies have addressed how brand engagement emerges in the broader context of consumer lives. The purpose of this paper is to develop a novel intersubjective hermeneutic framework that bridges the socially constructed as well as the individualised meanings of brand engagement in the context of service research.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper adopts a theory-building approach based on recent developments in the service-centric marketing literature.

Findings

The authors offer a novel theoretical perspective that recognises the intersubjective and phenomenological nature of individual and collective consumer brand experiences, and show how such experiences emerge from socially constructed brand engagement practices using the co-constituting lens of value-in-use.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed conceptual framework invites further empirical and contextual investigations of intersubjective brand engagement in both online and offline contexts.

Originality/value

The contribution of this framework is twofold. First, the authors draw on the intersubjective orientation and hermeneutic framework to provide conceptual clarity in relation to the nature of brand engagement practices, brand experiences, and value-in-use, and discuss their interrelationships. Second, the authors address the nature of meaning ascribed to engagement beyond customer-firm-brand relationships, and discuss why any given consumer’s experience of brand engagement reflects a complex dialectic between socially constructed and individualised brand meanings. In doing so, the integrative framework recognises the interplay between the intersubjective and phenomenological natures of consumer brand experiences, and offers insights as to how these experiences are framed by broader socially constructed engagement practices.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Anu Helkkula, Carol Kelleher and Minna Pihlström

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish experiences from practices and relate this distinction to current developments in value research within service‐dominant (S‐D…

2244

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish experiences from practices and relate this distinction to current developments in value research within service‐dominant (S‐D) logic and the broader service domain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a conceptual overview of how experiences and practices have been characterized in the literature to date, how they differ from each other, and if and where they intersect. Following this, the epistemological and methodological differences between practices and experiences are illustrated using narrated experiences and practical observations of car‐washing.

Findings

While practices are primarily routinized patterns of behaviour, experiences focus more on individuals' value determinations in different contexts. Thus, different types of methodology are needed to observe customers' behaviour in value‐creating practices and interpret customers' sense making of value experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Both phenomenological value experiences and value co‐creation practices contribute to value research: while practices are the shared possession of the collective, internal and individual differentiation is included in practices. Practices may change or evolve over time, possibly resulting in improved value outcomes or experiences. Opportunities and challenges should be considered by value researchers including the temporal nature of practices and experiences, evidence about value, and the intersubjectivity of social relations.

Practical implications

To better facilitate individual experiences and collective practices, service providers need to understand both experiences and practices in order to co‐create value with individuals and their networks.

Originality/value

This study is the first systematic attempt in service research to present an analysis of the distinction between experiences and practices, and to analyze the relevance of this distinction for value research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 243000