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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Guido Caniglia, Beatrice John, Martin Kohler, Leonie Bellina, Arnim Wiek, Christopher Rojas, Manfred D. Laubichler and Daniel Lang

This paper aims to present an experience-based learning framework that provides a bottom-up, student-centered entrance point for the development of systems thinking…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an experience-based learning framework that provides a bottom-up, student-centered entrance point for the development of systems thinking, normative and collaborative competencies in sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework combines mental mapping with exploratory walking. It interweaves mapping and walking activities with methodological and theoretical inputs as well as with reflections and discussions. The framework aligns experiential activities, i.e. mental mapping and walking, with learning objectives, i.e. novice-level sustainability competencies. The authors applied the framework for student activities in Phoenix/Tempe and Hamburg/Lüneburg as part of The Global Classroom, a project between Arizona State University in the USA and Leuphana University of Lüneburg in Germany.

Findings

The application of the experience-based learning framework demonstrates how students started developing systems thinking (e.g. understanding urban systems as functional entities and across different domains), normative (e.g. using different sustainability principles) and collaborative (e.g. learning across disciplinary, social and cultural differences) competencies in sustainability.

Originality/value

The experience-based learning framework contributes to the development of curricular activities for the initial development of sustainability competencies in introductory-level courses. It enables students from different disciplinary, social and cultural backgrounds, e.g. in international education, to collaboratively start developing such competencies. The framework can be adapted to different educational contexts.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2020

Jodie Birdman, Aaron Redman and Daniel J. Lang

This paper aims to investigate student experiences and the potential impact of experience-based learning (EBL) in the early phase of graduate sustainability programs…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate student experiences and the potential impact of experience-based learning (EBL) in the early phase of graduate sustainability programs through the lens of key competencies. The goal is to provide evidence for the improvement of existing and the thorough design of new EBL formats in sustainability programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This comparative case study focuses on the first semester of three graduate sustainability programs at Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany and Arizona State University, USA, for two of which EBL was a core feature. The study compares the curricula, the teaching and learning environments and the reported experiences of one student cohort from each of three programs and synthesizes the resulting insights. Student interviews were combined with student self-assessments and supported by in-vivo observations, curriculum designer input, instructor interviews and course materials. MAXQDA was used for data analysis following a grounded theory approach.

Findings

EBL influences students’ reflective capacity, which impacts the development of key competencies in sustainability. Qualitative analysis found four key themes in relation to the students’ learning in EBL settings, namely, discomfort, time-attention relationship, student expectations of instructors and exchange. The intersection of these themes with curricular structure, student dispositions and differing instructor approaches shows how curriculum can either support or interrupt the reflective cycle and thus, holistic learning.

Research limitations/implications

With the focus on the first semester only, the students’ competence development over the course of the entire program cannot be demonstrated. Learning processes within EBL settings are complex and include aspects outside the control of instructors and curriculum designers. This study addresses only a select number of factors influencing students’ learning in EBL settings.

Practical implications

Early engagement with EBL activities can push students to leave their comfort zones and question previous assumptions. Designing curricula to include EBL while encouraging strong intra-cohort connections and creating space for reflection seems to be an effective approach to enable the development of key competencies in sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the experiences of students in EBL through a key competence lens. The study combines student self-perceptions, instructor reflections and in-vivo observations. Data collection and analysis were conducted by a researcher not affiliated with the programs. These factors make for a unique study design and with data-driven insights on the seldom researched competence-pedagogy-curriculum connection.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Susanna Paloniemi

This paper aims to examine employees' conceptions of the meaning of experience in job‐competence and its development in workplace context. The aim is to bring out the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine employees' conceptions of the meaning of experience in job‐competence and its development in workplace context. The aim is to bring out the variety of conceptions related to experience, competence and workplace learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on interview data from six Finnish small and medium sized enterprises. The data were collected as a part of a larger European Union research project, Working Life Changes and Training of Older Workers (WORKTOW) during spring 1999. The approach chosen for the analysis presented in this paper was phenomenography.

Findings

The findings in the paper show the importance accorded to experience in competence and in workplace learning. The employees valued work experience as the main source of their competence. They also developed their competence mainly through learning at work. The role of social participation in work communities and learning through experiences was emphasized.

Practical implications

The paper shows that differentiating employees' conceptions paves a way to more specific perspectives on the development and utilisation of experience‐based competence in work communities and organisations.

Originality/value

In this paper the findings are discussed in the light of construction and development of older workers' job‐competence in working life. It is argued that experience serves several kinds of purposes in workplace learning also among experienced workers.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Yngve Antonsen and Geir Bye

This study aims to analyse the line managers and employees’ use of lean task boards over time in Norwegian municipalities using action learning theory. The research…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the line managers and employees’ use of lean task boards over time in Norwegian municipalities using action learning theory. The research question was the following: what kind of action learning processes do the line managers and employees’ use of the lean task board promote in municipalities’ healthcare units?

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study data from a Norwegian municipality involved analyses of 750 internal self-recorded logs from task board sessions from 6 different units and 25 semi-structured interviews of managers and employees.

Findings

The task board works for line managers to make employees responsible for forwarding ideas, solutions and implementation of new actions. The use of the task boards contributes to systemising work through establishing new routines and improving orderliness at work. The line managers used the task boards as a project management system to track progress in the purchasing of diverse equipment and initiatives to improve professionalism and their units’ facilities. The study explains the learning challenges for managers using the lean task board, as the method promotes finding experience-based solutions that do not involve critical reflection and use of theory.

Practical implications

The lean task board is well-suited for managers to promote learning processes that counteract chaos in local healthcare organisations. However, the task board has limitations as a method for improving services amongst healthcare units and for solving difficult problems.

Originality/value

The study contributes to understanding how action learning theory can be applied to the analysis of the results of lean task board sessions

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Geoffrey Prideaux and James E. Ford

A recent report has suggested that there is a total inadequacy of management education and development in Britain. One fundamental concern is the design of programmes…

Abstract

A recent report has suggested that there is a total inadequacy of management education and development in Britain. One fundamental concern is the design of programmes which focus on the development of effective managers, as opposed to just teaching people about business and management. An innovative management development programme has been developed, based around key adult learning principles such as emphasis on management competencies and work experience based learning.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

S. Prideaux and James E. Ford

In this second of two articles describing a two‐year part‐time management development programme conducted at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, an account of the…

Abstract

In this second of two articles describing a two‐year part‐time management development programme conducted at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, an account of the impact of the programme on the development of the participants as managers is offered from their viewpoint, and the implications for management development offered by the course are assessed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Gustav Hägg and Agnieszka Kurczewska

The quest of this paper is to justify, elaborate and elucidate the concepts of action, experience and reflection, and how they are intertwined when discussing contemporary…

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1196

Abstract

Purpose

The quest of this paper is to justify, elaborate and elucidate the concepts of action, experience and reflection, and how they are intertwined when discussing contemporary entrepreneurship education. These concepts have been given a meaning in entrepreneurship education, but have not been discussed in-depth, and by that have been abridged in meaning and purpose, and mostly been treated in isolation from each other.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and takes its starting point in the historical development of the field and discusses the concepts, from philosophical roots and their application, in entrepreneurship education.

Findings

Neither of the discussed concepts are enough to generate learning one by one, as they are intertwined within the learning process that aims to generate knowledge. From this perspective, an understanding of how these concepts work, both individually and in synergy, is of importance for entrepreneurship education.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion presented in this paper may be a starting point for future empirical studies on entrepreneurial learning, by developing the meaning of action, reflections and experience, or by trying to conceptualize them.

Practical implications

The study indicates that entrepreneurship education should not concentrate only on one dimension of the entrepreneurial learning process, as for example on actions, but should try to combine all of its discussed elements.

Originality/value

By exploring the origins and developments around the concepts, the paper brings a deepened understanding of what the field considers as important when learning entrepreneurship. By decomposing and mutually referring the concepts, we contribute to the call of strengthening the theoretical and philosophical understanding in entrepreneurship education.

Details

Education + Training , vol. 58 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Pernilla Gripenberg

IT related skills are vital for becoming and remaining a citizen in a digitally supported information society – also for adults who are no longer in school; do not use IT…

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1949

Abstract

Purpose

IT related skills are vital for becoming and remaining a citizen in a digitally supported information society – also for adults who are no longer in school; do not use IT in their work; are unemployed, self‐employed, or retired; or otherwise without the technical support, possibilities for training, and availability of a community of practice and “master users” that are common in organizational contexts. The paper aims to draw on literature on learning IT skills in the organizational context and to apply this in a non‐organizational, community context. The paper seeks to explore how individual IT‐skill and knowledge development could be supported using formal and informal learning strategies, including community services, training courses, information events, learning community and other learning mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is empirically grounded in a research and development project with 50 participating families who received a PC, printer, and internet connection, as well as training, technical support, and information events over a period of two years. Both qualitative and quantitative data were gathered throughout the project. Data are here analyzed as an extensive case study.

Findings

Based on experiences from the project the paper describes how “digital literacies” could be learned and supported and inclusion in the digital information society enhanced in practice. The paper develops a framework that shows how different learning strategies and mechanisms support different kinds of computer knowledge and skill areas; describes three interlinked areas of IT knowledge and skills; and suggests a number of practical implications on how computer self‐efficacy could be supported in a non‐organizational context.

Originality/value

The paper draws on extant knowledge about learning and developing IT‐skills in the organizational context, and applies this knowledge in a different context in order to explore how this knowledge can be used also outside organizations to support adults to be part of the digitally supported information society.

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2019

Aisha Yaquob Alsobhi and Khaled Hamed Alyoubi

Through harnessing the benefits of the internet, e-learning systems provide flexible learning opportunities that can be delivered at a fixed cost at a time and place to…

Abstract

Purpose

Through harnessing the benefits of the internet, e-learning systems provide flexible learning opportunities that can be delivered at a fixed cost at a time and place to suit the user. As such, e-learning systems can allow students to learn at their own pace while also being suitable for both distance and classroom-based learning activities. Adaptive educational hypermedia systems are e-learning systems that employ artificial intelligence. They deliver personalised online learning interventions that extend electronic learning experiences beyond a mere computerised book through the use of intelligence that adapts the content presented to a user according to a range of factors including individual needs, learning styles and existing knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel adaptive e-learning system called dyslexia adaptive e-learning management system (DAELMS). For the purpose of this paper, the term DAELMS will be employed to describe the overall e-learning system that incorporates the required functionality to adapt to students’ learning styles and dyslexia type.

Design/methodology/approach

The DAELMS is a complex system that will require a significant amount of time and expertise in knowledge engineering and formatting (i.e. dyslexia type, learning styles, domain knowledge) to develop. One of the most effective methods of approaching this complex task is to formalise the development of a DAELMS that can be applied to different learning styles models and education domains. Four distinct phases of development are proposed for creating the DAELMS. In this paper, we will discuss Phase 3 which is the implementation and some adaption algorithms while in future papers will discuss the other phases.

Findings

An experimental study was conducted to validate the proposed generic methodology and the architecture of the DAELMS. The system has been evaluated by group of university students studying a Computer Science related majors. The evaluation results proves that when the system provide the user with learning materials matches their learning style or dyslexia type it enhances their learning outcomes.

Originality/value

The DAELMS correlates each given dyslexia type with its associated preferred learning style and subsequently adapts the learning material presented to the student. The DAELMS represents an adaptive e-learning system that incorporates several personalisation options including navigation, structure of curriculum, presentation, guidance and assistive technologies that are designed to ensure the learning experience is directly aligned with the user's dyslexia type and associated preferred learning style.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Rod Gerber

It is often assumed by management in different workplaces that the people who work there acquire their training before they take up a job or that they are trained in their…

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3585

Abstract

It is often assumed by management in different workplaces that the people who work there acquire their training before they take up a job or that they are trained in their job. Learning is a lifelong process that should be embraced by all workers. Increasing interest is being placed on companies as learning organisations in which the employees collectively contribute to the improvement of the workplace enterprise. However, modest attention has been paid to the ways by which people learn in their work. This article indicates, based on considerable worksite research, that how people learn in their work is a complex process characterised by a range of variations. Management in different worksites needs to understand the diversity of approaches by workers to learning in their jobs and offer opportunities for such activities to be continuous, reflective, individualised and/or collective. A more effective workforce will result if the workers can maximise learning in their work.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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