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Article

Sara Leroi-Werelds, Sandra Streukens, Yves Van Vaerenbergh and Christian Grönroos

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether explicitly communicating the customer’s resource integrating role in value propositions improves or diminishes value…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether explicitly communicating the customer’s resource integrating role in value propositions improves or diminishes value proposition effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on existing research on value propositions, three effectiveness criteria are used: role clarity, expected customer value, and purchase intention. Two experiments manipulating the presence of the customer’s resource integrating role in value propositions test the conceptual model in both an indirect interaction (Study 1, toothpaste, n=207) and a direct interaction context (Study 2, fitness program, n=228). Additionally, Study 2 includes the moderating role of resource availability.

Findings

Explicitly communicating the customer’s resource integrating role in value propositions increases customers’ role clarity, which in turn influences customer’s attitude toward the service and purchase intention through a service-related (i.e. expected benefits and expected efforts) and an ad-related (i.e. ad credibility and attitude toward the ad) route. However, these results only hold for customers high in resource availability.

Originality/value

This research provides initial empirical support for the often-stated claim that value propositions should include the (potential) value of the offering as well as the (resource integrating) role of the customer. Taking a broader perspective, this research provides initial empirical support for recent calls to develop marketing communication practices that facilitate value-in-use. This paper’s findings show that adopting service logic in marketing communications seems to improve value propositions’ effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article

ERIC G. FLAMHOLTZ, MARIA L. BULLEN and WEI HUA

There is growing recognition that the core economic resources of the current era are human and intellectual capital, rather than physical assets such as inventories…

Abstract

There is growing recognition that the core economic resources of the current era are human and intellectual capital, rather than physical assets such as inventories, plant, and equipment. Given the increasing importance of human capital and intellectual property as determinants of economic success at both the macroeconomic and enterprise levels, it is clear that the nature of investments made by firms need to shift to reflect the new economic realities. Specifically, if human capital is a key determinant of organizational success, then investments in training and development of people also become critical. In turn, there is a need to develop concepts and tools for monitoring and evaluating management development programs in terms of their impact, results, and value or return on investment. The specific objective of this article is to draw upon the concepts and measurement approaches of the field that has come to be known as “human resource accounting” and show how they, specifically the stochastic rewards valuation model, can be used as tools for the measurement of the value of investments in training programs designed to increase the value of human capital.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article

Karen C. Kao, Sally Rao Hill and Indrit Troshani

The study investigates how the congruence of online deal popularity and star rating influences service quality expectation in online group buying (OGB) websites. It also…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates how the congruence of online deal popularity and star rating influences service quality expectation in online group buying (OGB) websites. It also investigates the role of authenticity perceptions of online cues.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments are used to assess the effects of congruence between deal popularity and star rating on service quality expectation for service deals in an OGB website.

Findings

The findings suggest that a combination of congruently high deal popularity and high star rating has a stronger effect on expected service quality than a combination of congruently low cues. The findings further suggest that expected service quality is greater under the combination of high deal popularity and low star rating than the combination of low deal popularity and high star rating, showing the differences between incongruent cue combinations. The findings also show the moderating effect of consumer authenticity perceptions of cues on the expected service quality.

Originality/value

The novel contribution of the study is to extend cue congruence theory to explain how congruent online information cues and the consumers' authenticity perceptions of the cues influence consumers' judgment of online deals. The contribution is validated empirically in the context of OGB. The findings advance current knowledge concerning how consumers use online information cues.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Coskun Bakar, H. Seval Akgün and A.F. Al Assaf

This paper aims to conduct a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes regarding important aspects of service dimensions using SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conduct a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes regarding important aspects of service dimensions using SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach – The SERVQUAL scale is routinely used at the Baskent University Hospitals Network, Turkey. The study consisted of 550 randomly chosen patients who presented to any member of the hospital network during January and February 2006 and received treatment as inpatients or outpatients at those healthcare facilities.

Findings

The patients' perceived scores were higher than expected for an ordinary hospital but lower than expected for a high‐quality hospital. Young patients had a high‐expected service score gap and a low adequate service score difference. Highly educated patients had a high‐expected service score difference. Uninsured patients had a low adequate service score difference. Originality/value – Baskent University multidisciplinary healthcare teams have performed periodic patient satisfaction surveys in order to identify strengths and problem areas, formulate the quality improvement objectives and monitor progress towards achieving these objectives. However, patient satisfaction survey results are often highly positive. In these cases, improving care is not easy because measures are not sensitive enough to changes. Therefore a more sensitive measurement tool based on the SERVQUAL scale was developed. The authors believe that patient opinions are extremely important because they provide information that is not necessarily emphasized by managers or health care professionals, resulting in a more complete assessment of past performance and a clearer road map for future action.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Katherine E. Harris, Lois A. Mohr and Kenneth L. Bernhardt

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences in consumers' attributions of blame for service failures and its affect on their expectations for recovery in both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences in consumers' attributions of blame for service failures and its affect on their expectations for recovery in both online and offline settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of non‐student adults participated in a 2 (service type) by 2 (shopping medium) experimental design testing the affects of on‐ and offline shopping on consumers' attributions of blame for a service failure. Specifically, regression is employed to test the effects of on/offline medium on blame and expected service failure recovery in both the airline and banking industries.

Findings

Empirical support is found for the hypotheses that online subjects blame themselves more for service failures, and, in turn, expect less of a recovery than offline consumers. The on/offline medium is shown to have a mediated effect on expected service failure recovery through blame in the airline data. In the bank data, on/offline medium has a significant affect on blame, and blame has a significant affect on expected service failure recovery, though on/offline medium does not show a mediated affect on expected service failure recovery.

Practical implications

Because online customers tend to blame themselves more for service failures, managers may be able to offer less of service failure recovery online than offline. Furthermore, online customers may be more willing to recover for themselves, thereby saving the firm money and placing customers more in control of their service experience.

Originality/value

This study allows for the possibility of consumers' blaming themselves for service failures and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to examine how attribution for service failure affects expected service failure recovery in both on‐ and offline settings. Managers should find our results useful in developing service failure recovery strategies.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Jochen Wirtz, Doreen Kum and Khai Sheang Lee

Studies reputation for service quality as a potential moderator of the relationship between a service guarantee and its impact on consumer perceptions of service quality…

Abstract

Studies reputation for service quality as a potential moderator of the relationship between a service guarantee and its impact on consumer perceptions of service quality, risk and purchase intent. A before‐after experimental design, set in the hotel industry, was employed to explore the impacts of a service guarantee for an outstanding versus a good service provider. Contrary to what had been implied in the past, the introduction of an explicit guarantee had no negative effect for the outstanding service provider in our study. In fact, the provision of a guarantee marginally improved expected quality, reduced perceived risk, and had no effect on purchase intent. However, for the good quality provider, the impacts were all positive and strong, and apart from the impact on perceived risk, the effects were significantly stronger than those for the outstanding quality provider. Our findings thus support the hypothesized moderating role of service quality.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Jeffrey W. Rogers

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual risk assessment technique to aid facility managers with developing robust asset management programs. It proposes to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual risk assessment technique to aid facility managers with developing robust asset management programs. It proposes to evaluate three discrete risk sensitivity levels relative to the recognition of stochastic costs on expected budgetary outcomes. The paper expands the domain of available risk assessment techniques toward estimating impacts from uncertainty on desired levels of service.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the concept that facility managers can cost‐effectively manage robust asset management programs. This is accomplished by evaluating simple relationships between risk‐sensitive decision‐response alternatives and systems degradation characteristics. The resulting parameters are aggregated to estimate expected budgetary outcomes for robust asset management programs.

Findings

The paper reveals that if facility managers assume risk‐avoidance positions, they can positively affect expected budgetary outcomes for robust asset management programs. Facility managers can manage the magnitude of these adverse impacts by mitigating stochastic costs associated with the completion of unscheduled asset management activities.

Research limitations/implications

The expected implications are enhancements to the abilities of facility managers to cost‐effectively manage stochastic costs relative to risk sensitivity and desired levels of service. However, because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack general usability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

The practical implications allow facility managers to cost‐effectively manage adverse impacts on expected budgetary outcomes for robust asset management programs.

Social implications

The expected contribution is a tool for facility managers to manage uncertainty when allocating limited financial resources among the competing corrective, maintenance, and rehabilitation activities within robust asset management programs.

Originality/value

The paper fulfills an identified need to study how facility managers can do more with less. This need to be cost‐effective requires facility managers to recognize stochastic costs on the expected budgetary outcomes for robust asset management programs.

Details

Facilities, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article

Mark F. Toncar, Ilan Alon and Everlyne Misati

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the role of price and price expectations in service quality evaluations based on a study of the US hotel sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the role of price and price expectations in service quality evaluations based on a study of the US hotel sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an experimental study to test service quality and price congruency through randomly assigned treatments to a quota sample of 120 students.

Findings

The research shows that the degree to which subjects' price expectations are met influences their evaluations of service quality. This is especially true in the case of a price loss; when the actual price exceeds the expected price. However, when there is a price gain, subjects' evaluations of service quality were not affected.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment sacrificed external validity for internal control; an artificial stimulus was used in a carefully controlled experimental setting to control the subjects' exposure to price and service manipulations. A small sample size of student subjects was used; only 20 subjects in each treatment group. The results obtained were based on subjects' evaluation of a written script, and not an actual service encounter. By virtue of using an experimental design, the experiment did not consider a broad range of potential factors.

Originality/value

The paper uses an experiment to test the effects of price gains and price losses on consumers' perceptions of the quality of a service encounter.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article

Coskun Bakar, H. Seval Akgün and A.F. Al Assaf

The aim of this paper is to document a study, in which the SERVQUAL scale was used to evaluate hospital services, conducting a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to document a study, in which the SERVQUAL scale was used to evaluate hospital services, conducting a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes regarding the important aspects of service dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The SERVQUAL scale was implemented into routine use at the Baskent University Hospitals Network in Baskent, Turkey. The study consisted of 550 randomly chosen patients who presented to any member hospital in that network during January and February 2006 and received treatment as inpatients or outpatients at those healthcare facilities. The SERVQUAL scale was utilised to evaluate hospital services.

Findings

A questionnaire was completed by a total of 472 (86.0 per cent) patients. The perceived scores of the patients were higher than expected for an ordinary hospital but lower than expected for a high‐quality hospital. The highest difference between the perceived service score and the expected service score was found at the Alanya Application and Research Center in Alanya, Turkey.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the use of the SERVQUAL scale in measuring the functional quality of the hospitals assessed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article

Asma Shabbir, Shahab Alam Malik and Saquib Yusaf Janjua

The purpose of this paper is to investigate patients’ views toward the perceived service quality of public and private healthcare service providers. Determinants of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate patients’ views toward the perceived service quality of public and private healthcare service providers. Determinants of healthcare service quality were compared by carrying out a GAP analysis to equate perceived and expected services and examined differences in the service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample comprises 310 inpatients of public and private healthcare service providers. Self-administered questionnaires were used along a five-point Likert scale and analyzed through the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. GAP analysis was used to observe the difference between expectations and perceived service quality.

Findings

A cross-sectional study revealed significant quality gaps between the expected and perceived services of public and private healthcare service providers; conversely patients’ expectations are not fully met in both types of hospitals. Private hospitals surpassed in terms of overall perceived service quality from their counterparts. Perceived services were found better in terms of physician medical services in public sector hospitals, while rooms and housekeeping services were found better in terms of private sector hospitals.

Practical implications

The result can be used by both public and private healthcare service providers to restructure their quality management practices which could only be possible through effective management commitment, regular patients’ feedback and translucent complaint procedures.

Originality/value

The study conceptualizes the expected and perceived hospital service quality dimensions as an eight-dimensional framework. A comparison between public and private sector hospitals is made to get a better understanding about the differences in the perceived healthcare services among two sectors. Consequences of the study will aid hospital managers and policy makers to get a fuller picture of healthcare services in order to contrive enhancement practices.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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