Search results

1 – 10 of over 25000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Göran Svensson and Greg Wood

The objective of this research is to develop and describe a conceptual framework of corporate ethics in total quality management (TQM).

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to develop and describe a conceptual framework of corporate ethics in total quality management (TQM).

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a summarised in‐depth and longitudinal case illustration. The summarised case describes corporate ethics in an intra‐corporate relationship.

Findings

TQM requires human resources and failing to care for them will affect accordingly the success of TQM. The case description illustrates the evolution of management versus employee expectations and perceptions of corporate ethics. It has an emphasis on the human resources of a company that strives towards TQM. As the quality of corporate ethics decreases the outcome of TQM is also affected (i.e. directly or indirectly). The case is initialised in an atmosphere of management and employee optimism and positivism of corporate ethics, which is a requisite from both parties in order to ensure prosperous TQM. The successive change towards pessimism and negativism of corporate ethics in the intra‐corporate relationship concludes the in‐depth case description.

Research limitations/implications

Four parameters of corporate ethics are used to incorporate corporate ethics into TQM, namely management versus employee expectations and perceptions. Internal corporate quality management should always be regarded as dependent upon the achieved equilibrium between management and employee perceptions. It is also dependent upon the derived equilibrium between management and employee previous expectations.

Practical implications

An important insight of this research is that TQM requires the continuous attention to the management versus employee expectations and perceptions inherent in corporate ethics of internal business operations. Furthermore, corporate ethics is complementary to business ethics.

Originality/value

The case description has shown that TQM may be running well and accomplishing the hard goals. However, TQM is not only about figures, profits and costs. It is also a business approach that should penetrate all activities inside and outside that are related to the company, including the soft issues.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Elizabeth A. Anderson

Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was…

Abstract

Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions across all four clinics, the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients’ expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm’s evaluation of its service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Nick Johns and Antony Howard

This study examines qualitative and quantitative differences between service expectations and perceived performance in the foodservice industry, using the profile…

Abstract

This study examines qualitative and quantitative differences between service expectations and perceived performance in the foodservice industry, using the profile accumulation technique. Parallel series of data were obtained for service performance perceptions from actual customers at two pizza restaurants. The three sets of data were compared qualitatively and quantitatively. Results showed that customers structured their perceptions of the service into a common set of elements (termed aspects) and attached quality attributes to each of these elements. The three data series exhibited very similar dimensionalities in terms of both aspects and attributes of the service. Attributes were identified as satisfiers or dissatisfiers. In order to gain insight about their structure they were separately recoded using four different authors’ lists of quality dimensions. The significance of their quantitative differences for positive and negative disconfirmation was also examined. Aspects and attributes were used to calculate matrices of quality metrics referring to both the “aspects” dimensions provided by respondents and the dimension lists of the four authors. The work demonstrates that it is possible to obtain and analyse customers’ expectations and perceptions without making pre‐assumptions about them, and will therefore be of interest to managers and marketers of restaurants and other services.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Göran Svensson

Looks at the generality and reliability of multi‐item measures that are based upon the perception of one or more individuals. Proposes that at least an overall time aspect…

Abstract

Looks at the generality and reliability of multi‐item measures that are based upon the perception of one or more individuals. Proposes that at least an overall time aspect is missing, which would contribute to the measurement of the perceived direction of change in a specific empirical context. The issues raised in current marketing research literature on the use of multi‐item measures relate to the generality and reliability of the findings regarding time and space. Emphasises the limits of the issues of time. The characteristics of data collected using a particular multi‐item measurement scale determine the reliability of the findings. Determines, by a methodological procedure, the generality of the empirical outcome. The results may lack reliability and generality over time even if the same items of measurement are used in the same context. Therefore, introduces an overall trend dimension in multi‐item measures in order to incorporate the time aspect for each dimension in a construct. The trend dimension makes it possible to measure the perceived direction of change, and complements the facets, as well as the perceptual degree, of a phenomenon or object in a specific empirical context.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Göran Svensson

Generally, the article provides a fundament beyond the state‐of‐the‐art construct of service quality. In particular, the content is dedicated to the construct of…

Abstract

Generally, the article provides a fundament beyond the state‐of‐the‐art construct of service quality. In particular, the content is dedicated to the construct of interactive service quality in service encounters. Interactive service quality in a service encounter requires the simultaneous consideration of the service provider’s and service receiver’s perspectives. Furthermore, it also demands the consideration of both the service provider’s and the service receiver’s expectations and perceptions in a service encounter. The theoretical contribution is a generic conceptual framework of interactive service quality in service encounters consisting of the service continuum, the service cycle, and an interactivity model. The managerial contribution is a model of the invisibility dilemma of a service offer, the features of interactive service quality and an application model of interactive service quality in service encounters. Suggestions for further research are also proposed.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Hadyn Ingram and George Daskalakis

Reports on a study that applied the well‐ established SERVQUAL methodological instrument to an investigation of those hotels in Crete that have adopted the ISO 9000…

Abstract

Reports on a study that applied the well‐ established SERVQUAL methodological instrument to an investigation of those hotels in Crete that have adopted the ISO 9000 quality standard. Three service gaps are explored through a questionnaire survey of guests and managers in ten Cretan hotels. The study finds that there is a divergence between the perceptions of service quality of guests and managers, and that the greatest gaps exist in hotels of the highest quality classification. Finally, some implications of the ISO standard in hotels are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

David H. Wong, Nexhmi Rexha and Ian Phau

This paper aims to re‐examine the role of traditional service quality in an e‐banking environment by providing a review of how traditional service quality perceptions have…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to re‐examine the role of traditional service quality in an e‐banking environment by providing a review of how traditional service quality perceptions have evolved through the current and continuing stream of change in banking technology and the corresponding changes in the nature of how banks interact with their customers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a mail survey sent out to a commercially purchased mailing list of 2,500 business names and addresses. The overall usable response rate was 30.6 per cent. Quadrant analysis was performed on the service quality dimensions from the SERVQUAL scale.

Findings

While the importance ranking of the five SERVQUAL dimensions has not changed dramatically over the years, large discrepancies were found between customer expectations and their perceived performance of traditional banking services.

Practical implications

Quadrant analysis produced specific recommendations on how banks should prioritise the allocation of their resources to maintain high perceived service quality in their human interactions.

Originality/value

This is the first study which revisits and re‐examines traditional service quality in the e‐banking era. It highlights how high levels of traditional service quality may lead to increased customer trust and thus more successful cross‐selling of e‐banking products to customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Quality Services and Experiences in Hospitality and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-384-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Arthur Seakhoa-King, Marcjanna M Augustyn and Peter Mason

Abstract

Details

Tourism Destination Quality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-558-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Adrienne Curry and David Herbert

There are a number of approaches to service quality. Rather than discussing their individual merits and demerits, it is perhaps more fruitful to look to their integration…

Abstract

There are a number of approaches to service quality. Rather than discussing their individual merits and demerits, it is perhaps more fruitful to look to their integration and the extent to which they can be linked and serve one another. This paper aims to do just that. Inevitably the techniques considered have to be limited, but their interrelationship is made clear and their development potential highlighted. The particular quality tools illustrated are the Servqual model and quality function deployment (QFD), with process mapping serving as an intermediary tool for QFD. Three public service case examples are used to illustrate their successful use to date. Servqual measures both external customer/service provider expectations and perceptions and the existence or not of (in)formal standards, whilst QFD translates these results and measurements into organisational solutions in terms of product/service design, ensuring organisational standards to deliver what is required and helping to define a strategic planning process. Both of these quality management tools have been tested and used to positive advantage in the private sector. Their applicability to the public sector is being increasingly confirmed and they do offer a way forward for the future in terms of achieving the difficult and never‐ending task of continuous improvement in public services.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 25000