Search results

1 – 10 of 68
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Yochanan Altman and Yehuda Baruch

Within the current discourse on contemporary careers and the context of international assignments, this paper seeks to conduct a study of a large European MNC, with the…

Downloads
6008

Abstract

Purpose

Within the current discourse on contemporary careers and the context of international assignments, this paper seeks to conduct a study of a large European MNC, with the aim of theory development on expatriation/repatriation.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study, based on semi‐structured interviews in a major financial institution.

Findings

Motivation to expatriate falls into two distinct categories – company initiated assignments; and self‐initiated, career orientated and/or self‐development focused. The authors propose a two dimensional model to depict the emergence of a new expatriation path alongside the traditional one – differentiating those who respond to an international assignment call within a clearly framed career development path; and those embarking on international assignment as, primarily, a personal growth opportunity. A distinctive sub‐group of corporate self‐initiated expatriates is identified for the first time.

Research limitations/implications

A qualitative study within one company.

Practical implications

The emergent models could be utilized by HR managers to shape future policies and practices for global assignments.

Originality/value

Providing a new model to explicate the relevance of a protean career attitude in a global boundaryless career environment; outlining of new emergent international career trajectories, in particular corporate self‐initiated careers.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Anne Burmeister and Jürgen Deller

The purpose of this paper is to identify organizational support practices that facilitate repatriate knowledge transfer (RKT) in order to overcome the lack of strategic…

Downloads
1595

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify organizational support practices that facilitate repatriate knowledge transfer (RKT) in order to overcome the lack of strategic utilization of repatriate knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, 134 repatriates responded to an online questionnaire and evaluated the organizational support that their organizations provided to facilitate RKT. In Study 2, 22 repatriates and human resource managers were interviewed. Interviewees were asked to assess to which extent the use of seven high-performance work practices – selection and staffing, training, career development, job design, performance appraisal, compensation and rewards, and internal communication – before, during, and after international assignments facilitated RKT. They also explained how these practices were implemented in their organizations.

Findings

The results of Study 1 showed that organizations primarily provide administrative repatriation support, while more strategic and knowledge transfer-related support is missing. Study 2 indicated that certain support practices are more important for the utilization of repatriate knowledge than others. Knowledge-related debriefing sessions after repatriation and targeted internal communication mechanisms were seen as important enablers of RKT. In contrast, selection and financial rewards were not seen as relevant facilitators of RKT.

Originality/value

Research on RKT reports that organizations still lack the right tools to harvest repatriate knowledge. This study indicates which organizational support practices appear to be most important for the facilitation of RKT, and provides some guidance regarding their implementation.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Chun Guo, Emily T. Porschitz and José Alves

Drawing on career and self‐initiated expatriation/repatriation literatures, this paper aims to examine the career experiences of Chinese self‐initiated repatriates after…

Downloads
1608

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on career and self‐initiated expatriation/repatriation literatures, this paper aims to examine the career experiences of Chinese self‐initiated repatriates after their return to China.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an exploratory, qualitative study involving in‐depth interviews with 20 Chinese individuals who returned to China after spending at least three years living, studying and/or working in a range of “host” countries.

Findings

This study shows that the career agency of Chinese returnees reflects both independent and interdependent factors. It provides specific empirical support for Tams and Arthur's argument that career agency is impacted by both individual and contextual factors.

Research limitations/implications

The findings indicate the central role played by individual proactivity and contextual influences during self‐initiated repatriation. The small sample size allows for rich data, but limits the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Managerial practices that address the unique career values and expectations of self‐initiated repatriates can facilitate the application of skills and knowledge acquired abroad to the local context. Policy makers should provide more institutional support to encourage and facilitate the return of overseas Chinese.

Originality/value

This study is among only a small number to explore the experiences of self‐initiated repatriates in developing countries. Recent research has addressed the importance of recognizing and identifying the boundaries that constrain and enable global careers. This study identifies a number of such boundaries and also adds to the understanding of the challenges and difficulties of repatriation.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Kerri Anne Crowne

The purpose of this paper is to expand the research in knowledge management, by specifically examining knowledge transfer among expatriates, repatriates and top management

Downloads
3468

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the research in knowledge management, by specifically examining knowledge transfer among expatriates, repatriates and top management teams. The relationships posited here should aid multinational firms in increasing their international assignment return on investment.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous literature, a theoretical model of the anticipated impact of feedback seeking behaviors and social networks among international assignees and top management teams is presented.

Research limitations/implications

While this article expands the literature in knowledge transfer and encourages multinational enterprises to examine their knowledge management strategies among expatriate, repatriates and top management teams, the model presented is limited. It does not integrate some elements that may cause difficulties for expatriates and repatriates and hinder knowledge transfer.

Practical implications

Top management teams should take an active interest in increasing the knowledge transfer from expatriates and repatriates in the organization because of the expected positive impact it will have on global performance. In order to be more proactive, firms need to implement formal mechanisms, as well as encouraging informal mechanisms in order to transfer knowledge, which should aid the organization in such areas as their expatriation‐repatriation process and foreign subsidiary operations.

Originality/value

To date, no article has addressed how feedback‐seeking behaviors and social networks, together, can enhance knowledge transfer among expatriates, repatriates and Top Management Teams. Furthermore, evidence of effective knowledge transfer during international assignments is scant. Therefore this article fills a gap in the literature by expanding the research on knowledge management.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Robinson James

This study aims to investigate the influence of organisational politics on work engagement and the moderator effect of positive framing on this relationship

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the influence of organisational politics on work engagement and the moderator effect of positive framing on this relationship

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 241 public sector employees in Sri Lanka through a structured questionnaire and analysed with partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS_SEM).

Findings

The results indicated that organisational politics negatively influenced employees' work engagement, positive framing positively influenced engagement and weakened the negative relationship between politics and engagement.

Practical implications

This study suggests that organisation and individuals must take the necessary steps to enhance work engagement. Organisations must be transparent in all activities to avoid employees' negative perception. Also, organisations need to take steps to recruit employees with positive framing or develop this competency through training and development. Individuals also need to take necessary steps to frame the work environment positively to enhance their engagement in work.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature by being the first to examine the positive framing as a moderator in the relationship between politics and engagement. This study found that positive framing as a resource reduced the harmful effect of organisational politics on engagement and suggested positive framing can be considered as a resource in the future investigation of the job demand–resource model.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Leslie O. Morgan, Winter Nie and Scott T. Young

Global business frequently requires the expatriation and repatriation of managers and skilled workers. Previous research has focused on cultural and demographic factors…

Downloads
6204

Abstract

Global business frequently requires the expatriation and repatriation of managers and skilled workers. Previous research has focused on cultural and demographic factors that lead to success with this process. This study goes beyond the cultural and demographic issues to examine implications of operational and technology‐related factors, including use of standard practices, degree of technical sophistication of operations, and technical orientation of the employee. Our results indicate that the technical sophistication of operations abroad, use of standard practices at home, technical orientation of the individual, and increased responsibility and promotion all positively contribute to expatriate satisfaction. Repatriate satisfaction is primarily influenced by difficulty in finding a suitable position upon relocation home. The technical orientation of the individual, in turn, has important implications for repatriation success. This research identifies important new operational and technology‐related factors that should be considered by global firms in management of their internationally located operations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Luis Gomez‐Mejía and David B. Balkin

A survey of returned expatriate managers in an American multinational found that their assignments to subsidiary companies overseas had been an enjoyable experience for…

Downloads
1349

Abstract

A survey of returned expatriate managers in an American multinational found that their assignments to subsidiary companies overseas had been an enjoyable experience for most of them. But only 35 per cent of the sample felt satisfied with the repatriation process into the US. Reasons included difficulty in readjusting to US life and culture, to the head office organisation and their own changed status, and to the career development ladder, where they felt their career opportunities were limited. It is suggested that measures to prevent these problems occurring could include a guarantee of a satisfactory job on return, an arrangement to maintain the expatriate's home, regular visits to the US, and planned support and training before and after the assignment from experienced senior personnel.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Christine Ratnam and Jennifer Sansom

Considers the area of repatriation/reassignment of employees after international assignments and the effect that it may have on the successful internationalization of…

Abstract

Considers the area of repatriation/reassignment of employees after international assignments and the effect that it may have on the successful internationalization of organizations. By specifically highlighting experiences in this area, suggests that organizations may need to develop their international human resources policies further if they are to maximize workforce investment in globalization. Draws on recent research conducted (via survey and interview) with over 40 companies, together with other relevant research and the personal and professional experiences of the writers. Specifically focuses on the main organizational issues raised and, in particular, effects of disregarding repatriation, effects on strategic and organizational development, lessons to be learned for globalization and the need for a fully integrated HR approach.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Agnieszka Kierner

The purpose of this paper is to employ hope theory to explain the psychological process underlying the dual-career couple (DCC) family unit, during the full cycle of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to employ hope theory to explain the psychological process underlying the dual-career couple (DCC) family unit, during the full cycle of international relocation.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study is based on in-depth interviews with 28 international dual-careerists. Hope theory is used to describe the evolution of their goals, pathways and agency thinking before, during, and after expatriation.

Findings

The study reveals that dual-career partners initially build goals, pathways, and agency to support family relocation to facilitate the expatriate’s career goals, but later the absence of self-career realization means hope can diminish and the partner’s career comes to drive the goals set for repatriation. Future assignments would be considered only if both partners can arrange relevant employment for themselves.

Practical implications

Companies should develop DCC support practices such as designing shorter assignments, ensuring that partners have work visas and support job seeking. Ideally, multinational corporations would employ the spouse in the DCC.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to explore the evolution of the goals of DCCs during the entire expatriation process.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Meredith Downes, Anisya S. Thomas and Carolan McLarney

This study explores the role of expatriate satisfaction in organizational performance. It also posits that international transfer of knowledge and corporate learning are…

Downloads
3330

Abstract

This study explores the role of expatriate satisfaction in organizational performance. It also posits that international transfer of knowledge and corporate learning are determinants in the overall satisfaction of expatriate managers. Moreover, as organizations gain international experience, their expatriate managers contribute to the global learning of the firm. This corporate learning provides the tools (e.g. foreign market experience and know‐how) for future expatriate managers and increases the likelihood of positive overseas experiences. Results from 132 expatriates of Fortune 500 firms indicate that satisfaction is significantly related to the performance of the organization as a whole and, further, that this relationship will vary depending on the international orientation of the organization.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

1 – 10 of 68