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1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Nida Gull, Muhammad Asghar, Mohsin Bashir, Xiliang Liu and Zhengde Xiong

This study aims to answer how family-supportive supervisor behavior (FSSB) reduces work–family conflict (WFC), family–work conflict (FWC) and employee turnover intention…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to answer how family-supportive supervisor behavior (FSSB) reduces work–family conflict (WFC), family–work conflict (FWC) and employee turnover intention. Based on the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the direct and indirect effects of emotional exhaustion between WFC/FWC and turnover intention. Moreover, this study explores FSSB moderated the role relationship between WFC/FWC and emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws time-lagged data from two phases of a survey of health-care workers working in Chinese hospitals. In the first phase, data on WFC/FWC and turnover were collected from 407 workers. In second round, 387 employees express their feeling about emotional exhaustion and supportive supervisor behavior toward support family members. The data was collected from health-care workers, and a moderated mediation technique was tested using structural equation model-AMOS.

Findings

The findings of this study show that the positive relation between WFC/FWC and emotional exhaustion is high for employees with lower family-supportive supervisors than those with higher family-supportive supervisors. This finding provides further insight into the mechanism of how family and work conflicts impact turnover intention.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical study based on the conservation of resources theory, the relationship between WFC/FWC and turnover intention, considering the mediating role of emotional exhaustion and the moderating effects of FSSB. This paper proposes that FSSB can reduce WFCs, addressing a significant research gap in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2022

Ana Junça Silva, Alexandra Almeida and Carla Rebelo

This study aims to develop a framework that explains how and when telework is related to emotional exhaustion and task performance, by conceiving work overload as a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a framework that explains how and when telework is related to emotional exhaustion and task performance, by conceiving work overload as a mediator and self-leadership as a moderator. For this purpose, two studies were conducted. Study 1 aims to understand whether telework would be related to emotional exhaustion and task performance and if work overload would mediate such relationships. Study 2 aims to analyze whether self-leadership was a significant moderator of the mediated relations found in Study 1.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested in a sample of 207 (in Study 1) and 272 (in Study 2) participants, which were exclusively teleworking. The results were analyzed using PROCESS macro in SPSS.

Findings

The results of Study 1 showed that telework dimensions were negatively related to work overload, which consequently decreased emotional exhaustion and increased task performance. In Study 2, self-leadership moderated the indirect effect of work overload on the relationship between telework and emotional exhaustion, such that the indirect effect was stronger for those who scored higher in self-leadership. However, it was not significant for task performance.

Originality/value

This paper adds to research on telework by focusing on the employee's mental health and performance, in the context of mandatory confinement. The authors identified telework dimensions that may act as resources to cope with the increased work overload inherent to telework, as well as the importance of personal resources in these relationships.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2022

Zahoor Ahmad Parray, Shahbaz Ul Islam and Tanveer Ahmad Shah

The main goal of this research study is to look at the mediating effect of emotional exhaustion in the association between workplace incivility and job outcomes (job…

Abstract

Purpose

The main goal of this research study is to look at the mediating effect of emotional exhaustion in the association between workplace incivility and job outcomes (job stress, job satisfaction, and employee turnover intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gathered field data from individuals working in the higher education sector of Jammu and Kashmir to test the proposed study paradigm. A total of 550 respondents reported their perceptions of workplace incivility, emotional exhaustion, and job-related outcomes (job stress, job satisfaction, and employee turnover intention) at Time 1 in the Kashmir division and Time 2 in the Jammu division of Jammu and Kashmir via a two-wave data collection design.

Findings

The findings supported the hypothesized relationships, demonstrating that emotional exhaustion acts as a mediator between workplace incivility and employee job outcomes (job stress, employee job satisfaction, and employee intention to leave).

Practical implications

The findings of this research study will assist organizations and practitioners in comprehending the implications of workplace incivility and emotional exhaustion, as well as how they positively impact job-related outcomes (employee job stress, turnover intention), and negatively on job satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study adds to existing knowledge on COR theory by suggesting workplace incivility as a stressor and also testing emotional exhaustion as a defense mechanism for determining the effect of workplace incivility on employee job outcomes.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Nazia Rafiq, Ambreen Sarwar and Maria Rasheed

The fear of COVID-19, being an emerging research variable and a parcel of the ongoing pandemic, has not yet been fully studied with respect to leadership and employee…

Abstract

Purpose

The fear of COVID-19, being an emerging research variable and a parcel of the ongoing pandemic, has not yet been fully studied with respect to leadership and employee family life. Based on the conservation of resources theory, the current study aims to investigate the relationship between despotic leadership and work-family conflict under the context of fear prevailing due to COVID-19. The paper also highlights the mediating role of emotional exhaustion between the two variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two waves by using a time-lagged design from 225 nurses from hospitals in the Central Punjab region in Pakistan. Analysis was done through process macro in SPSS.

Findings

Results showed that despotic leadership is positively related to work-family conflict directly and through emotional exhaustion indirectly. Furthermore, the moderation of fear of COVID-19 has also been noted such that its increase strengthened the direct as well as the indirect relationship between despotic leadership and work-family conflict.

Originality/value

During the days of COVID-19, the pandemic posed a strong threat to employees' family lives, especially in the presence of despotic leaders at the workplace. Amidst the widespread fear and harmful effects of COVID-19 on economies and organizations, this study provides novel implications for policymakers, researchers and practitioners for mitigating the impact of despotic leadership on employees' family lives.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2022

Liisa Mäkelä, Vesa Suutari, Anni Rajala and Chris Brewster

This study explores whether expatriation type (assigned expatriates (AEs) versus self-initiated expatriates (SIEs)) is linked to job exhaustion via possible differences in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores whether expatriation type (assigned expatriates (AEs) versus self-initiated expatriates (SIEs)) is linked to job exhaustion via possible differences in required efforts for their jobs and the rewards they gain from them, and/or the balance between efforts and rewards. Adopting effort–reward imbalance (ERI) and job demands/resources (JD-R) theories, the authors study the possible role of ERI as a mediator between expatriation type and job exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was carried out in co-operation with two Finnish trade unions, providing representative data from 484 assigned and SIEs. The authors test this study’s hypotheses through latent structural equation modelling, and the analysis was conducted with Stata 17.0 software.

Findings

The results show that ERI between them are correlated with the job exhaustion of expatriates in general and there are no direct links between expatriation type and job exhaustion. The required effort from AEs was higher than that from SIEs though no difference was found for rewards, and the match between effort demands and rewards is less favourable for AEs than SIEs. AEs experienced higher job exhaustion than SIEs because of the higher effort demands and greater imbalance between efforts and rewards.

Originality/value

The study examines the work well-being of two types of expatriates and explores the underlying mechanisms that may explain why they may differ from each other.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Christina Ling-hsing Chang and Sheng Wu

The speedy development of information technology (IT) is indeed a significant issue to support the enterprises to spread their products and services to their customers…

Abstract

Purpose

The speedy development of information technology (IT) is indeed a significant issue to support the enterprises to spread their products and services to their customers. Although the adoption of IT in the enterprises can help employees' work, it will increase their work exhaustion and job burnout too.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data of this study was collected from Chinese IT personnel (ITP): 543 and Chinese information systems (IS)/IT users: 525, totaling 1,068 respondents.

Findings

The result shows that the influences of the organizational factors and guanxi on the work exhaustion are different between Chinese ITP and IS/IT users in the research model. Also the implications of the study are discussed and made some contribution to the research and management practice.

Originality/value

By comparison between the Chinese ITP and IS/IT users, this study shows that guanxi can be antecedent factor to some organizational factors, and the organizational factors guanxi have had a different effect on the work exhaustion of Chinese ITP and IS/IT users. Given that the critical successes to the organizations, management should focus on what direction to reduce Chinese ITP and IS/IT users work exhaustion.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Sari Mansour

Through the lens of conservation of resource theory and the model of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO), this study tests the relationship between high performance…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of conservation of resource theory and the model of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO), this study tests the relationship between high performance work practices (HPWP), emotional exhaustion and service recovery performance (SRP). It examines the direct effect of AMO bundles on emotional exhaustion and the indirect effect of these bundles on SRP via emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

In a sample of 1,664 flight attendants from Canada, Germany and France, this study uses a quantitative method. Using AMOS V.24, CFA was used to test quality of scales, model fit as well as the direct effects. The method of Monte Carlo (parametric bootstrap) and more precisely bias corrected percentile method were used to test the mediation mechanism, based on 5,000 bootstrapping and 95% confidence intervals.

Findings

Results show that all AMO bundles can be considered as a resource caravan passageway protecting employees against resources loss and allowing them to perform well and to recover service after a failure. They reveal that each bundle has a direct, negative link with emotional exhaustion, a health-related well-being and an indirect effect on SRP via emotional exhaustion.

Research limitations/implications

The finding further highlights the need to distinguish between AMO dimensions in strategic HRM research and practice. The cross-sectional nature of this study limits the establishment of causal links between variables. The author encourages future researchers to adopt a research design enabling to collect data at two or three-time periods and involving multi-source data.

Practical implications

Companies should be aware of the mechanisms through which HPWP influence the occupational health and performance of flight attendants and consider that “different bundles can have different effects” as important when they would redesign their HRM practices. In turn, it is rather opportunity enhancing HPWP (e.g. empowerment, work teams) that will be the most efficient in improving SRP. In a customer service context, and for flight attendants who work for prolonged hours with sometimes demanding passengers, it seems very important that airlines empower their flight attendants to use their skills and abilities to respond to problems arising onboard, either from service failures or any complaint a passenger may have. Employers should aim to create pools of practices designed to enrich and protect the resources of their employees allowing them to reduce emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

This research study contributes therefore to the HRM-well-being-individual and/or organizational performance debate in a very particular context, by using the AMO framework to test the proposed relationship. In doing so, this study advances the theoretical and empirical evidence on how HR systems and AMO framework can be applied in this setting. The findings allow distinguishing which bundle of HRM is the most influential on emotional exhaustion, which can advance the literature in strategic human resource management. The paper adds to the literature by addressing the role of emotional exhaustion rather than happiness-related measures of well-being. Thus, our results stress the importance of health-related well-being, and emotional exhaustion, as an important pathway through which AMO-bundles influence performance outcomes and confirm that there are different well-being pathways to consider in the HRM-performance relationship. By using different bundles of AMO, the study advances the literature by showing that each bundle could have a different effect as the findings show that only opportunity enhancing HPWPs still directly impacted SRP after introducing the mediator (emotional exhaustion).

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 July 2008

Daniel W. Law, John T. Sweeney and Scott L. Summers

Despite its widespread acceptance and application in the psychology literature, exhaustion, the core dimension of job burnout, has only recently been examined in the…

Abstract

Despite its widespread acceptance and application in the psychology literature, exhaustion, the core dimension of job burnout, has only recently been examined in the domain of public accounting. These studies highlighted the problem of exhaustion within the profession and examined its causes relative to the environment of public accounting. Another factor, not previously addressed in the context of public accounting, is the role personality plays on public accountants’ exhaustion. The current study addressed this void by examining how the personality traits of hardiness, workaholism, neuroticism, and Type-A behavior in public accountants affect exhaustion. The results indicated that public accountants who were high in hardiness experienced significantly less exhaustion. The role stressors of overload and conflict were also significant contributors to public accountants’ exhaustion.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-961-6

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2022

Felicito Angeles Jabutay, Sasithorn Suwandee and Jerwin Angeles Jabutay

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between perceived customer unfriendliness, emotional exhaustion, emotional dissonance and turnover intent using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between perceived customer unfriendliness, emotional exhaustion, emotional dissonance and turnover intent using the stress–strain–outcome model in the call center industry in the Philippines. In addition, this paper also investigates the mediating effects of leader–member exchange (LMX) and emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposed a theoretical model hypothesizing the linkages between the abovementioned variables. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses using a data set from a sample of 605 Filipino call service representatives.

Findings

The results indicate that perceived customer unfriendliness as a stressor is a positive predictor of emotional exhaustion and emotional dissonance as strains. In turn, emotional exhaustion and emotional dissonance positively influence turnover intent. The results also reveal that LMX mediates the impact of perceived customer unfriendliness on emotional exhaustion. Further, the exhaustion variable mediates the effect of emotional dissonance on turnover intent.

Practical implications

The results suggest that contact with unfriendly customers has negative emotional implications and highlight the need for training or intervention programs to help service agents develop coping mechanisms. The results also imply that leader-initiated high-quality LMX could help attenuate perceived customer unfriendliness's impact on emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge,this paper is the first to examine and confirm the causal relationships of the proposed model’s variables using the stress–strain–outcome model.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Mavis Agyemang Opoku, Seung-Wan Kang and Najung Kim

Within the theoretical frameworks of conservation of resources and job demands-resources (JD-R), the study aims to examine how sleep deficit could be negatively related to…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the theoretical frameworks of conservation of resources and job demands-resources (JD-R), the study aims to examine how sleep deficit could be negatively related to creativity at work by depleting critical resources of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 368 individuals nested in 40 teams at a call center. The authors conducted multilevel analysis to test the proposed hypotheses to account for the hierarchical nature of the data while simultaneously estimating the effect of predictors at different levels on individual-level outcomes and maintaining the predictors' level of analysis.

Findings

Through the data, the study presents how the depletion of resource, that is, emotional exhaustion, functions as a mediating mechanism that connects sleep deficit to creativity at work. Further, the study presents that higher job demands can worsen the negative effects of resource depletion on creativity at work because they further deplete resources needed for creative behaviors. Specifically, when sleep-deprived, those working in a high-task-interdependence climate are likely to experience emotional exhaustion more severely than do those in a low-task-interdependence climate. Also, the relationship between emotional exhaustion and creativity is more negative for managers than for non-managers because of managers' higher job demands.

Practical implications

By presenting sleep deficit-linked inhibitors of creativity at work, the authors highlight the importance of securing sufficient sleep and affective resources when designing jobs and HR practices in organizations.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the call for attention to examining the mechanisms through which sleep deficit affects employee creative behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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