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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Shailesh Rastogi and Jagjeevan Kanoujiya

This study aims to analyze the volatility spillover effects of crude oil, gold price, interest rate (yield) and the exchange rate (USD (United States Dollar)/INR (Indian…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the volatility spillover effects of crude oil, gold price, interest rate (yield) and the exchange rate (USD (United States Dollar)/INR (Indian National Rupee)) on inflation volatility in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (GARCH) models (Baba, Engle, Kraft and Kroner [BEKK]-GARCH and dynamic conditional correlation [DCC]-GARCH) to examine the volatility spillover effect of macroeconomic indicators and strategic commodities on inflation in India. The monthly data are collected from January 2000 till December 2020 for the crude oil price, gold price, interest rate (5-year Indian bond yield), exchange rate (USD/INR) and inflation (wholesale price index [WPI] and consumer price index [CPI]).

Findings

In BEKK-GARCH, the results reveal that crude oil price volatility has a long time spillover effect on inflation (WPI). Furthermore, no significant short-term volatility effect exists from crude oil market to inflation (WPI). However, the short-term volatility effect exists from crude oil to inflation while considering CPI as inflation. Gold price volatility has a bidirectional and negative spillover effect on inflation in the case of WPI. However, there is no price volatility spillover effect from gold to inflation in the case of CPI. The price volatility in the exchange rate also has a negative spillover effect on inflation (but only on CPI). Furthermore, volatility of interest rates has no spillover effect on inflation in WPI or CPI. In DCC-GARCH, a short-term volatility impact from all four macroeconomic indicators to inflation is found. Only crude oil and exchange rate have long-term volatility effect on inflation (CPI).

Practical implications

In an economy, inflation management is an essential task. The findings of the current study can be beneficial in this endeavor. The knowledge of the volatility spillover effect of all the four markets undertaken in the study can be significantly helpful in inflation management, especially for inflation-targeting policy.

Originality/value

It is observed that no other study has addressed this issue. We do not find any other research which studies the volatility spillover effect of gold, crude oil, interest rate and exchange rate on the inflation volatility. The current study is novel with a significant contribution to the vast knowledge in this context.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Mohini Gupta and Sakshi Varshney

The aim the study is to explore the impact of real exchange rate volatility and other macroeconomic variable such as price of import, industrial production and real…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim the study is to explore the impact of real exchange rate volatility and other macroeconomic variable such as price of import, industrial production and real exchange rate on 45 import commodities, considering global financial crisis period on India's import from the US. The empirical analysis at disaggregate level of import indicates the existence of both short-run and long-run effect in one-third importing commodities. The results show both positive and negative effect and causality among variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses E-GARCH model to gage the real exchange rate volatility, an autoregressive distributive lag (ARDL) bound test technique to discover the adequate short- and long-run relationships and Toda-Yamamoto causality method to analyze the causality among variables. The study uses the time period from 2002:M09 to 2019:M06.

Findings

The empirical analysis at disaggregate level of import indicates the existence of both short-run and long-run effect in one-third importing commodities. The results show both positive and negative effects and causality among variables.

Practical implications

The finding of the study suggests that macroeconomic variables have significant role and could be important to undertake the small and medium scale industries in policymaking. Government may need to make decision for micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) as their performance can bring change in the trade to compete globally by increasing and controlling the price of the import and defending the domestic competitiveness.

Originality/value

The study uses additional variable namely price of import and includes the global financial crisis period to measure dampening effect on each commodity by using robust econometric technique in context of emerging nation like India.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Bisharat Hussain Chang, Suresh Kumar Oad Rajput, Niaz Ahmed Bhutto and Zahida Abro

Recent literature has shifted to examining whether exchange rate volatility symmetrically or asymmetrically affects the trade flows. This study aims to extend the existing…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent literature has shifted to examining whether exchange rate volatility symmetrically or asymmetrically affects the trade flows. This study aims to extend the existing literature by examining the effects of extremely large to extremely small changes in exchange rate volatility series on the US imports from Brazil, India, Mexico and South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

For examining the effects of extreme changes, multiple threshold nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag (MTNARDL) model is used and the exchange rate volatility series is divided into quintiles and deciles. It helps to examine the effects of each quintile/decile of exchange rate volatility series on the US imports.

Findings

Findings indicate that the effects of extremely large changes in the exchange rate volatility series significantly differ from the effects of extremely small changes in the exchange rate volatility series on the US imports.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are very important. These findings help to consider the effect of extreme changes before devising policies related to trade flows.

Originality/value

This study mainly focuses on US imports from Brazil, India, Mexico and South Africa. In addition, this study extends the existing literature by using a novel methodology called MTNARDL model.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Chong Lee‐Lee and Tan Hui‐Boon

The purpose of this study is to examine the factors of exchange rate volatility from the macroeconomic perspective for four neighbouring ASEAN economies.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the factors of exchange rate volatility from the macroeconomic perspective for four neighbouring ASEAN economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has scrutinised the link between macroeconomic factors and exchange rate volatility in both the short and the long run by applying econometrics techniques.

Findings

This study further suggests the link between macroeconomic factors and exchange rate volatility in both the short and the long run for the selected economies. The empirical results, however, indicate that a set of common factors seems to influence the exchange rate volatility, whereby the stock market is a great influence commonly found across countries. The Indonesian rupiah seems to be the most sensitive to the innovations in macroeconomic factors, while the Singapore dollar is the least.

Research limitations/implications

The macroeconomic factors are believed to be the forces behind exchange rate volatility through the presumable rigidities of their exchange rates, resulting from the managed float exchange rate system adopted by those countries. Their capital markets are vital in maintaining exchange rate stability, hence suggesting the imperative role of respective authorities and market players in managing a viable capital market.

Originality/value

Little attention has been given to developing countries' experiment with their exchange rate systems due to their presumed rigid volatility. This study adopts a more sophisticated approach in measuring the volatility of the exchange rate and examines the underlying factors of exchange rate volatility instead of the level of exchange rate.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Mohsen Bahmani‐Oskooee and Scott W. Hegerty

Since the last review article by McKenzie, the literature has experienced a surge in the number of empirical articles. These new contributions, coupled with those that…

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Abstract

Purpose

Since the last review article by McKenzie, the literature has experienced a surge in the number of empirical articles. These new contributions, coupled with those that were overlooked by McKenzie, set the stage for this review. Many of the recent studies have been empirical in nature and these deserve specific attention. Thus, this paper aims to survey and review all of the studies by paying attention to the attributes outlined in the text.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the vast empirical literature, up to 2005, to assess the main trends in modeling and estimating these trade flows at the aggregate, bilateral, and sectoral levels.

Findings

The increase in exchangerate volatility since 1973 has had indeterminate effects on international export and import flows. Although it can be assumed that an increase in risk may lead to a reduction in economic activity, the theoretical literature provides justifications for positive or insignificant effects as well. Similar results have been found in empirical tests. While modeling techniques have evolved over time to incorporate new developments in econometric analysis, no single measure of exchangerate volatility has dominated the literature.

Originality/value

An argument put forward by the opponents of the floating exchange rates is that such rates introduce uncertainty into the foreign exchange market, which could deter trade flows. However, a theoretical argument is put forward by some to show that uncertainty could also boost trade flows if traders increase their trade volume to offset any decrease in future revenue due to exchange rate volatility. The empirical literature reviewed in this paper supports both views.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Muhammad Aftab, Zaheer Abbas and Farrukh Nawaz Kayani

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of exchange rate volatility at sectoral level on the exports trade of Pakistan. All the sectors involved in the export…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of exchange rate volatility at sectoral level on the exports trade of Pakistan. All the sectors involved in the export trade (proposed by the State Bank of Pakistan, by commodity), were used to study this relationship at a more minute level.

Design/methodology/approach

Quarterly data regarding research were collected over the period 2003 to 2010 from databases of State Bank of Pakistan and International Monetary Fund financial statistics. The bound testing approach proposed by Pesaran et al., was used to study the relationship between sectoral export and exchange rate volatility, while augmented Dickey Fuller (ADF) and Phillips Perron tests were used to test the unit root of series and GARCH,proposed by Bollerslev, was used to study exchange rate volatility.

Findings

The results show that exports are negatively influenced by exchange rate volatility and relative prices while positively affected by foreign income. This relationship holds for all sectors where bound testing revealed the existence of long‐ run relationship, although some equations results were not statistically significant.

Practical implications

The paper's findings can be used to form such policies which result in a stabilized and competitive exchange rate, so that Pakistan's exports can be increased.

Originality/value

Previous studies have been conducted on aggregated data set for exports in the Pakistani context, which hinders pertinent information; however this information is possible by studying disaggregated data. The paper fills a research gap by taking sectoral level data, to divulge the behavior of individual sectors against exchange rate volatility.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Athanasios Koulakiotis, Katerina Lyroudi, Nikos Thomaidis and Nicholas Papasyriopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to examine volatility transmissions between portfolios of cross‐listed equities and exchange rate differences and also the volatility

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine volatility transmissions between portfolios of cross‐listed equities and exchange rate differences and also the volatility persistence for home, foreign equities, and exchange rate differences in the UK and German markets.

Design/methodology/approach

A primary focus of this paper is to see if there is an impact first on the volatility persistence for foreign equities that are listed in the UK and German markets, second on the respective home portfolios of cross‐listed equities, and third on the exchange rate differences. In addition, whether there are any bilateral spillovers between the following equity portfolios: foreign cross‐listed equities, home cross‐listed equities, and also local or global exchange rate differences are investigated.

Findings

The paper finds that the volatility persistence is more prominent than error persistence from cross‐listed equities, foreign or home, and the exchange rate differences. Furthermore, the transmission mechanism indicates a bilateral integration process in some of the cases that were examined. Based on these results, it is concluded that in the UK market the foreign cross‐listings affect less the domestic equities compared to the German market.

Originality/value

This paper examines the interdependence of portfolios of home and foreign equities for cross‐listings that belong to the same stock exchange with two exchange rates, a local and a global one in order to provide more evidence in this area of literature.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Chandan Sharma

This study aims to examine the relationship between exchange rate risk and export at commodity level for the Indian case.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between exchange rate risk and export at commodity level for the Indian case.

Design/methodology/approach

The monthly panel data used for analysis are at a disaggregated level, which cover around 100 products, encompassing all merchandize sectors for the period spanning from 2012:12 to 2017:11. To measure the exchange rate volatility, the authors use real as well as nominal exchange rate concepts and predict the volatility of exchange rate using the autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic-based model. They use pooled mean group, mean group and common correlated effects mean group estimator that is suitable for the objectives and data frequency.

Findings

The empirical analysis indicates both short- and long-term negative effects of exchange rate variations on exporting. Specifically, in the long run, real exchange rate as well as nominal exchange rate volatility has significant effects on export performance, yet, the effects of uncertainty of nominal exchange rate is much severe and intense. In the short run, it is the nominal exchange rate uncertainty that hurts exports from India. Nevertheless, the short-run effect is much lesser than the long-run, supporting the argument that the short-term exchange rate risk can be hedged, at least partially, through financial instruments; however, uncertainty of the long-term horizon cannot be hedged easily and cost-effectively.

Practical implications

Reducing uncertainty and attaining stability in exchange rate and price level should be an important policy objective in developing countries such as India to achieve higher export growth, both in the short and long run.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies, this paper tests the relationship using micro-level data and uses advanced econometric techniques that are likely to provide more precise information regarding the association between exchange rate volatility and trade flows.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

James Temitope Dada

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of asymmetric structure inherent in exchange rate volatility on trade in sub-Saharan African countries from 2005 to 2017.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of asymmetric structure inherent in exchange rate volatility on trade in sub-Saharan African countries from 2005 to 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

17 countries in sub-Saharan African Countries are used for the study. Exchange rate volatility is generated using generalised autoregressive conditional heteroscedacity (1,1), while the asymmetric components of exchange rate volatility are generated using a refined approach of cumulative partial sum developed by Granger and Yoon (2002). Two-step generalised method of moments is used as the estimation technique in order to address the problem of endogeneity, commonly found in panel data.

Findings

The result from the study shows the evidence of exchange rate volatility clustering which is strictly persistent in sub-Saharan African countries. The asymmetric components (positive and negative shocks) of exchange rate volatility have negative and significant effect on trade in the region. Meanwhile, the effect of negative exchange rate volatility is higher on trade when compared with the positive exchange rate volatility. Furthermore, real exchange rate has negative and significant effect on trade in sub-Saharan African countries.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes of this study are important for participants in foreign exchange market. As investors in foreign exchange market react more to the negative news than positive news, investors need to diversify their risk. Also, regulators in the market need to formulate appropriate macroeconomic policies that will stabilize exchange rate in the region.

Originality/value

This study deviates from extant studies in the literature by incorporating asymmetric structure into the exchange rate trade nexus using a refined approach.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Kalu Onwukwe Emenike

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate selected West African currencies/US dollar exchange rates for the evidence of volatility spillover. Specifically, the paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate selected West African currencies/US dollar exchange rates for the evidence of volatility spillover. Specifically, the paper examines West African CFA franc, Gambian dalasi and Nigerian naira exchange rates in relation to the USD, for any evidence of shock and volatility spillover.

Design/methodology/approach

The author employs multivariate GARCH (1,1)–BEKK model which enables the evaluation of the interaction within the volatility of two or more series because of its capability to detect volatility spillover among time series observations, as well as the persistence of volatility within each series.

Findings

The major findings of this study are as follows: there is evidence of volatility clustering in West African CFA franc, Gambian dalasi and Nigerian naira exchange rates in relation to the USD. There is evidence of bi-directional shock and volatility spillover between the Nigerian naira and West African CFA franc/USD exchange rates, and uni-directional shock spillover from the Gambian dalasi to the West African CFA franc/USD exchange rates. There is, however, no evidence of exchange rate shock and volatility spillover between Nigerian naira and Gambian dalasi.

Originality/value

Although considerable literature exists on the volatility of exchange rate in West Africa and comparative analysis of exchange rates volatility in few countries of West Africa, there is absence of empirical studies on exchange rate volatility spillover among countries in the region. Since containing exchange rate volatility is one of the major objectives of monetary policy, understanding the nature and direction of exchange rate volatility spillover would propel formulation exchange rate policies that would minimise exchange rate uncertainty and entrench sustainable development. In addition, the nature of exchange rate volatility spillover between West African countries would provide basis for international traders and foreign portfolio investors to develop effective strategies for hedging against exchange rate shocks that are propagated across countries by designing appropriate risk management techniques.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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