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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Amy Kirby

– The purpose of this paper is to explore volunteering opportunities for young adults with criminal records (“young ex-offenders”).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore volunteering opportunities for young adults with criminal records (“young ex-offenders”).

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted primarily in one London borough. It involved mapping volunteering opportunities for young ex-offenders and conducting in-depth interviews with young ex-offenders and practitioners from volunteer-involving organisations (VIOs) and resettlement organisations.

Findings

Several perceived benefits of volunteering for young ex-offenders were identified; particularly in relation to “softer” outcomes such as building confidence, learning new skills and developing a routine. Perceived challenges focused on whether or not organisations were able to provide volunteers with adequate levels of support; concerns about levels of engagement among volunteers and confusion over safeguarding procedures, particularly in relation to the obtaining of Disclosure and Barring Checks.

Originality/value

This paper offers practical insight into the scope of volunteering for young ex-offenders which may be of use to VIOs and resettlement organisations interested in providing such opportunities to young ex-offenders.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Adrian Darakai, Andrew Day and Joe Graffam

Ex-prisoners often face significant challenges in their efforts to find meaningful and stable work, undermining their chances of successful reintegration back into the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Ex-prisoners often face significant challenges in their efforts to find meaningful and stable work, undermining their chances of successful reintegration back into the community. These problems are likely to be compounded for those who have an intellectual disability (ID), given evidence that the disabled generally experience high levels of discrimination when applying for and maintaining jobs. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether members of the public hold different attitudes and expectations towards the employment of ex-offenders who have an ID and a history of criminal offending.

Design/methodology/approach

Samples of 642 participants, recruited via social media, were presented with vignettes, and then completed a short survey designed to measure their attitudes and expectations towards the employment of ex-offenders.

Findings

Whilst the presence of a mild ID did not significantly affect community attitudes towards ex-offender employment, it did change expectations about employment outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

It appears that ex-offenders are perceived as a homogenous group of people, despite actual and substantial differences existing within this population.

Practical implications

There is a need to actively educate the community about differences between subgroups of ex-offenders in relation to the employment needs of those with an ID.

Social implications

The social inclusion of ex-offenders with an ID lies at the heart of any effective and progressive criminal justice policy.

Originality/value

This is one of the only studies that has examined public attitudes towards this group.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Angela Hall, Stacy Hickox, Jennifer Kuan and Connie Sung

Barriers to employment are a significant issue in the United States and abroad. As civil rights legislation continues to be enforced and as employers seek to diversify…

Abstract

Barriers to employment are a significant issue in the United States and abroad. As civil rights legislation continues to be enforced and as employers seek to diversify their workplaces, it is incumbent upon the management field to offer insights that address obstacles to work. Although barriers to employment have been addressed in various fields such as psychology and economics, management scholars have addressed this issue in a piecemeal fashion. As such, our review will offer a comprehensive, integrative model of barriers to employment that addresses both individual and organizational perspectives. We will also address societal-level concerns involving these barriers. An integrative perspective is necessary for research to progress in this area because many individuals with barriers to employment face multiple challenges that prevent them from obtaining and maintaining full employment. While the additive, or possibly multiplicative, effect of employment barriers have been acknowledged in related fields like rehabilitation counseling and vocational psychology, the Human Resource Management (HRM) literature has virtually ignored this issue. We discuss suggestions for the reduction or elimination of barriers to employment. We also provide an integrative model of employment barriers that addresses the mutable (amenable to change) nature of some barriers, while acknowledging the less mutable nature of others.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Stephen Pilgrim and Annel Smith

Aims to address some of the ethnic considerations, regarding ex‐offenders’ rehabilitation, which are current in present social policy. Elaborates on media attention to…

288

Abstract

Aims to address some of the ethnic considerations, regarding ex‐offenders’ rehabilitation, which are current in present social policy. Elaborates on media attention to deviant behaviour among ethnic minorities and how crime by black offenders (when compared with levels of similar committed by white offenders), has been highlighted but that numbers of Asian offenders are lower than blacks or whites. Commends the Apex Community Entrepreneurs Scheme (ACES) project that aims to help ex‐offenders to continue their lives as law‐abiding members of society, by assisting them to find employment. Sums up that numerous amendments are needed to assist the rehabilitation of ethnic minority ex‐offenders into the mainstream.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Jakari N. Griffith and Nicole C. Jones Young

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that affect how managers assess the importance of criminal history for job seekers with criminal records in Ban the Box states.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that affect how managers assess the importance of criminal history for job seekers with criminal records in Ban the Box states.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a phenomenological investigative approach to examine narrative interview data obtained from 18 human resource (HR) professionals in organizations in five Ban the Box states.

Findings

Contrary to previous research, the findings presented in this paper show that managers are inclined to hire applicants with a criminal history. However, study findings indicate that those hiring decisions are positively influenced by: perceived value of criminal history; concerns about safety and cost; characteristics of the offense; motivation to hire; and evidence of applicant growth. Furthermore, a lack of systematic evaluation processes among hiring managers may present a barrier to employment.

Originality/value

This paper explores a poorly understood area of the HR management and employment inclusion literatures – the identification of factors that influence evaluations of applicants with a criminal history.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Shona Robinson-Edwards and Craig Pinkney

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of Ibrahim, an ex-offender who has embraced Islam. Ibrahim professes Islam to be the influential element to his…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of Ibrahim, an ex-offender who has embraced Islam. Ibrahim professes Islam to be the influential element to his desistance process. This study explores Ibrahim’s journey, emphasising and reflecting upon youth; criminality and religiosity. Much of the current research relating to Black men and offending is limited to masculinity, father absence, gangs and criminality. The role of religiosity in the lives of offenders and/or ex-offenders is often overlooked. The authors suggest that identity, religiosity and desistance can raise a host of complexities while highlighting the unique challenges and benefits experienced by Ibrahim, following the practice of religion.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper took a qualitative, ethnographic approach, in the form of analysing and exploring Ibrahim’s personal lived experience. The analysis of semi-structured interviews, and reflective diaries, utilising grounded theory allowed the formation of the following three core themes: desistance, religion and identity.

Findings

The findings within this paper identify an interlink between desistance, religion and identity. The role of religiosity is becoming increasingly more important in academic social science research. This paper highlights the complexities of all three above intersections.

Research limitations/implications

This paper explores the complexities of religiosity in the desistance process of Ibrahim. Research in relation to former gang members in the UK and the role of religiosity in their lives is fairly under-researched. This paper seeks to build on existing research surrounding gang, further exploring religiosity from a UK context.

Practical implications

Time spent with Ibrahim had to be tightly scheduled, due to the work commitments of both Ibrahim and the researcher. Therefore, planning had to be done ahead in an efficient manner.

Social implications

Researching the way individuals experience the world is a “growing phenomenon”. This paper aimed to explore the lived experience of religiosity from the perspective of Ibrahim. However, it was important to not stereotype and label all Black males who have embraced Islam and desisted from crime. Therefore, this paper’s intention is not to stereotype Black men, but to raise awareness and encourage further discussion surrounding the role of religiosity in the lives of ex-offenders’.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, studies specifically focusing on the role of Islam in the life of an ex-offender are few and far between. Therefore, findings from this study are important to develop further understanding surrounding religiosity, offending and desistance. This study explores the lived experiences of Ibrahim, an former gang member and ex-offender who professes Islam to be a fundamental source to his desistance process.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Alice Mills, Dina Gojkovic, Rosie Meek and David Mullins

The aim of the paper is to examine the contribution made by housing‐related third sector organisations (TSOs) in assisting ex‐prisoners to find housing, and the barriers…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to examine the contribution made by housing‐related third sector organisations (TSOs) in assisting ex‐prisoners to find housing, and the barriers they face in doing so.

Design/methodology/approach

An offender survey was used to measure awareness of and engagement with TSOs in eight prisons, alongside qualitative interviews with prisoners, criminal justice staff and TSO representatives.

Findings

Despite the involvement of TSOs, securing accommodation for ex‐prisoners remains complex and difficult, largely due to high service demand, housing shortages, budget cuts, and needs assessment and allocations systems which reduce the responsiveness of housing providers to the reducing re‐offending agenda.

Research limitations/implications

The research benefited from a mixed‐method approach which captured the perceptions of service users and professionals. The response rate for the offender survey was low (12 per cent), and the survey findings should be treated with caution.

Practical implications

Local authorities and other housing providers need to be more willing to accept ex‐prisoners as potential service users, and better links need to be made between local homelessness strategies, choice based lettings systems and prisoner resettlement programmes. Providing support services to ex‐offenders may encourage such acceptance and help to maintain the motivation to desist from crime.

Originality/value

Previous research has paid little specific attention to the role of TSOs in (ex)offender housing. This paper addresses this omission by drawing on original empirical research to examine the value of their work in securing accommodation for ex‐prisoners and helping to reduce re‐offending.

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

379

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The present study was designed to test whether the Ban the Box strategy of delaying knowledge of offences proved effective in helping ex-offenders to get hired and what factors helped managers make decisions. The researchers concluded there were five principal factors that influenced decisions. The first was “how the managers on Ban the Box schemes perceived the value of the criminal history.” The second important factor was “concerns about safety and cost.” The third factor was the “characteristics of the offence.” The fourth factor was the HR manager’s “motivation to hire”. The final important factor was “evidence of applicant growth.”

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Ian Stewart Hamilton

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the research within the area of employment for ex-prisoners who have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the research within the area of employment for ex-prisoners who have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI).

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature examining the employment of ex-offenders who have a SMI whilst also presenting a possible novel solution.

Findings

The research highlights a distinct lack of employment opportunities and numerous barriers for offenders with research often failing to distinguish between those who have mental health difficulties. However, early findings suggest that Individual Placement and Support (IPS) approaches can generate competitive employment for this population.

Practical implications

Offenders with a SMI are often routinely excluded from vocational services due to their mental health. This review has indicated that the way in which such offenders are treated in prison and reintegrated into the community needs to be addressed.

Social implications

By tackling this issue not only could the mental health and quality of life of ex-offenders be improved through sustained employment, but the marked economic costs to society that unemployment and recidivism encompasses could also be alleviated.

Originality/value

This review not only suggests a possible solution to the problems faced by offenders with mental health difficulties in gaining employment, but also presents a novel approach to future research that extends to outlining causal explanations for what works for whom.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Jill Earnshaw

The position of ex‐offenders as a group who areas equally in need of protection as those who arediscriminated against on grounds of race or sexis highlighted. The…

Abstract

The position of ex‐offenders as a group who are as equally in need of protection as those who are discriminated against on grounds of race or sex is highlighted. The provisions of the unfair dismissal legislation as they bear on ex‐offenders and the extent to which this legislation and the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 are safeguarding the recruitment prospects and job security of those whose convictions have become “spent” is examined. It is concluded that the legislative provisions are ineffective and in need of amendment, possibly along the lines of the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 and the Race Relations Act 1976. Such an Act should be complemented by a Code of Practice explaining employers′ obligations and urging them to include ex‐offenders in equal opportunities policies.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

1 – 10 of 344