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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Jean Kennedy, Michelle Worosz, Ewen C. Todd and Maria K. Lapinski

The purpose of this research paper is to segment US consumers based on their attitudes towards food safety and to demographically characterize each segment so that…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to segment US consumers based on their attitudes towards food safety and to demographically characterize each segment so that effective risk communication strategies and outreach programs may be developed to target vulnerable groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Factor analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were applied to data on consumer food safety attitudes of a probability sample of US adults, collected by telephone questionnaires (n=1,014).

Findings

The diversity of consumer attitudes was based on five factors; concern, trust, desire for a high level of regulation, acceptance for the number of people who are ill, hospitalized or die from foodborne illness, and preference for the right to purchase foods that are not guaranteed to be safe. The consumer segments identified on the bases of these factors can be classified as “confident,” “independent”, “trusting”, “cautious”, or “apprehensive” consumers. Socio‐demographic characteristics; education, income, person with allergy in the household, and person under the age of six living in the household, varied significantly between each consumer segment.

Practical implications

This study can inform effective food safety intervention strategies and target consumers most in need of food safety education that may enhance overall food safety knowledge and/or lead to changes in their behavior.

Originality/value

This paper uses exploratory factor analysis to identify the factors that underlie consumers' attitudes towards food safety. It is the first study to segment US consumers based on these factors and to demographically characterize each segment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Dima Faour-Klingbeil, Victor Kuri and Ewen Todd

The objectives of this study were to compare the hygiene standards and food handling practices between sole-proprietor and the corporate-managed restaurants in Lebanon and…

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this study were to compare the hygiene standards and food handling practices between sole-proprietor and the corporate-managed restaurants in Lebanon and to determine whether the variations between both groups are explained by and directly related to the type of management.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth observation assessment of food safety environment and practices was conducted on a convenient sample of 50 food businesses in Beirut, which are typical of foodservice outlets in Lebanon and in many countries of the Middle East. The observation assessment checklist comprised six constructs of 2–7 components for analysis. It covered all areas including documentation and record-keeping requirements, which are crucial parts of a food safety system.

Findings

There was a significant difference in the visual assessment score between sole-proprietor (77.9 ± 18.4) and corporate group (48.5 ± 12.8). Food handlers' behavior and hygiene standards were significantly associated with the type of management. However, there were still critical gaps in the food safety performance of the corporate group suggesting other underlying factors than the type of management.

Practical implications

Additional elements were drawn from this study for future food safety culture research. Understanding the food safety attitudes and perception of risks of the management representatives, leaders, or food business owners is vital to develop appropriate food safety interventions and foster a positive food safety culture in the foodservice industry.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study not only in Lebanon (or MENA) but also in other regions to measure the association of management type, that is, sole-proprietor management and corporate management, with the food hygiene standards and food safety practices in the foodservice establishments. This paper presents new findings that will be of value for researchers in food safety and will complement the existing literature on food safety culture in the foodservice industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Peter Murphy, Katarzyna Lakoma, Peter Eckersley and Russ Glennon

This chapter reviews the new inspectorate, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services, and the new Inspection Framework for Fire and Rescue…

Abstract

This chapter reviews the new inspectorate, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services, and the new Inspection Framework for Fire and Rescue Services in England. It will look at the antecedents of the inspectorate and the history of inspections in both the police and in the fire and rescue services. Prior to the Policing and Crime Act 2017, Fire and Rescue Services in England were without a dedicated independent inspectorate for almost 10 years and the government promised a new independent and a rigorous inspection regime. This chapter critically evaluates the government's response and the early development of the new regime.

Details

Rebuilding the Fire and Rescue Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-758-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Todd A. Boyle

This paper seeks to explore how repertory grids can be used to address IT team performance issues. The technique is introduced along with the process of creating and…

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2643

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore how repertory grids can be used to address IT team performance issues. The technique is introduced along with the process of creating and analyzing repertory grid data.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the application of the repertory grid technique to team performance issues. An example focused on eliciting the essential soft skills needed by programmers to effectively interact with IT team members is illustrated.

Research limitations/implications

To researchers, the main benefit of this paper is that it introduces a technique that is easy to use, enables the researcher to easily determine the relationship between constructs, is free from researcher bias, and can be applied to a wide variety of team‐related research studies.

Practical implications

This research presents a means by which human resource managers, hiring personnel, and team leaders can easily determine essential skills needed on the IT teams of the organization, thereby deriving a “wish list” from key IT groups as to the desired non‐technical characteFristics of potential new team members.

Originality/value

Shows how repertory grids can be used to address IT team performance issues.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Craig S. Fleisher and Natasha M. Blair

This paper examines the evolution of two separate fields, which are essentially concerned with the same issues but are framed by different academic and professional…

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973

Abstract

This paper examines the evolution of two separate fields, which are essentially concerned with the same issues but are framed by different academic and professional disciplines and practice. It appears that public affairs management researchers often fail to take into account parallel literature from the discipline of public relations — even when purporting to offer an interdisciplinary approach. Equally, the public relations literature frequently fails to speak the language of business management and narrowly defines such key business activities as marketing, policy and strategy. In this paper, the authors present evidence prescribing the differing evolution of public affairs and public relations. They compare and contrast public affairs and public relations in terms of their definitions, scholarship, survey evidence, leading writers, academic and professional associations and educational programme content. They conclude by offering several suggestions for closing the gap between the two areas.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Heather M. Caruso and Anita Williams Woolley

To reap the value in diverse teams, leaders may try to manipulate structural interdependence – through task design – to foster synergistic collaboration. However…

Abstract

To reap the value in diverse teams, leaders may try to manipulate structural interdependence – through task design – to foster synergistic collaboration. However, ambiguity about the nature and appropriate intersections of members’ unique and valuable cognitive perspectives can make it difficult to fully anticipate collaborative activity in task design. Here, teams need emergent interdependence – members must develop the desire and expectation to work interdependently for the benefit of the work. We therefore present a model of how leaders can promote emergent interdependence for diverse team success, identifying key antecedents and discussing psychological safety as a condition which can enhance their efforts.

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Lanndon Ocampo, Venus Acedillo, Alin Mae Bacunador, Charity Christine Balo, Yvonne Joreen Lagdameo and Nickha Shanen Tupa

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical account of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) based on the existing literature.

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3720

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical account of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) based on the existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper performs keywords search of published articles from 1930 to 2017 in widely used research databases.

Findings

The historical review shows that the OCB, as a field of study, was slow to develop. Although it has been introduced in the late 1970s and officially defined in the 1980s, its origins can be traced back to the 1930s. Despite this, OCB is generally regarded as a relatively new construct and has become one of the biggest subjects studied in the literature. OCB has reached far and wide into the business and management domains, supporting the fact that the well-being employees and their behaviors can greatly affect organizations’ effectiveness and performance. Having been the topic of a significant number of studies, there have been inconsistent research findings regarding the concepts. Furthermore, some concepts have been noted to overlap, with several scholars using different terms for essentially similar concepts.

Originality/value

The advent of technology and globalization has greatly affected organizations today which resulted in increased competition in the global business. Firms have started to look into the behavior exhibited by employees as a means of achieving competitive advantage, such as OCB. Voluminous works have been conducted regarding the study of OCB; however, none have been recorded to make an in-depth exploration of when and how it first surfaced. Since its official introduction, explorations regarding OCB have dramatically increased, most especially in the twenty-first century. Unfortunately, this has resulted in an increasing difficulty to keep up with the theoretical and empirical developments in the literature. As interest in OCB continues to grow, coherent integration of the concept becomes progressively more complex and necessary. This paper looks into the chronological evolution of the OCB, giving precise details of its development from the time it was first conceptualized up until the present wherein OCB has been used to indicate organizational effectiveness and performance.

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Caroline Barratt, Gillian Green and Ewen Speed

Previous research has established that there is a relationship between housing and mental health, however, understanding about how and why housing affects mental health is…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has established that there is a relationship between housing and mental health, however, understanding about how and why housing affects mental health is still limited. The purpose of this paper is to address this deficit by focusing on the experiences of residents of houses in multiple occupation (HMOs).

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 20 HMO residents who were asked about their housing career and experience of living in a HMO. Participants were recruited with assistance from community organisations and landlords.

Findings

The physical properties and social environment of the property, as well as personal circumstances experienced prior to the move into the property, all influenced how mental health was affected. The authors identify and discuss in detail three key meditating factors: safety, control and identity which may affect how living in the property impacts the mental health of tenants.

Practical implications

Good property management can lessen the potential harmful effects of living in a HMO. However, poorly run properties which house numerous vulnerable people may increase the risk of poor mental health due to attendant high levels of stress and possible risk of abuse.

Originality/value

Based on the reports of HMO residents, the authors outline the key mediating processes through which living in HMOs may affect mental wellbeing, as well as illuminating the potential risks and benefits of HMOs, an overlooked tenure in housing research.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1972

BC BLOOMFIELD, PAT LAYZELL WARD, EV CORBETT, JON ELLIOTT, JOHN SMITH, PETER LEWIS, HAROLD NICHOLS and CAVAN McCARTHY

RECENTLY I picked up a copy of NEW LIBRARY WORLD and browsed through it, detecting, or so I thought, a certain bias in its editorial approach towards the public librarian…

Abstract

RECENTLY I picked up a copy of NEW LIBRARY WORLD and browsed through it, detecting, or so I thought, a certain bias in its editorial approach towards the public librarian, and mentally discounted most of what I read until, emerging through the advertisements, I came to ‘The Shallow End’. Recognising yet another example of Parkinson's law (journalism expands to fill the space available) and style, I nevertheless, as they graphically say, ‘read on’. It was quickly borne in on me that the feelings expressed by the noxious Thrasher in the March and June issues were, with some modification and emendation, precisely what I uneasily felt in regard to the rôle of modern public library in this country. Both articles raise some very serious points and I thought I might expose some of my jaundiced qualms to the judicious discussion of others more nearly concerned.

Details

New Library World, vol. 73 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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