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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2020

Collence Takaingenhamo Chisita and Madelien C. Fombad

Knowledge sharing for evidence-based climate change adaptation is key to reducing vulnerabilities. The disastrous effects of the recent tropical cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge sharing for evidence-based climate change adaptation is key to reducing vulnerabilities. The disastrous effects of the recent tropical cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe’s eastern highlands, whereby lives and livelihoods were destroyed, calls for fundamental rethinking on how knowledge sharing can be useful in reducing vulnerabilities. This study aims to examine how knowledge sharing practices among selected climate action organisations can support positive results in evidence-based climate change adaptation in Zimbabwe and recommends a strategy to enhance knowledge sharing for evidence-based climate change adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher opted for a qualitative research methodology, and interviews were conducted with research participants to get in-depth information. The target population for the research is drawn from three climate change organisations in Zimbabwe. These participants were chosen because of their direct involvement in climate change adaptation and mitigation. Purposive sampling was used because it was considered an easy and informal method to reach the target population. The responses were coded and readied for analysis. Categories for analysis were also determined and described. The next section focuses on the presentation and interpretation of the responses.

Findings

The study found out that even though there is evidence of knowledge sharing in the selected organisations, there was a need for a strategy that integrates the efforts of all climate action organisation to realise successful climate change adaptation. Successful climate change adaptation requires an integrative force in the form of a strategy that supports knowledge sharing. The strategy breaks the silo mode of operation by bringing together all stakeholders through knowledge sharing.

Research limitations/implications

The research study was unique to the Zimbabwean climate change and adaptation context and only a purposive sampling of participants representing three climate change action was feasible.

Social implications

The proposed model will enhance knowledge sharing among climate change and adaptation organisations in Zimbabwe. It will transform knowledge management practices among climate change organisations in Zimbabwe.

Originality/value

The study recommends a knowledge sharing strategy that can be useful in supporting climate change adaptation. The model will support decision-making by providing access to shareable information on climate change. The proposed knowledge sharing strategy integrates the efforts of all stakeholders, including communities, government and academia, among many. The study proposes an original model for climate change adaptation for Zimbabwe.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Emmanuel Kanchebe Derbile

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how farmers are reducing vulnerability of rain‐fed agriculture to drought through indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how farmers are reducing vulnerability of rain‐fed agriculture to drought through indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) in the Atankwidi basin, north‐eastern Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on combined qualitative and quantitative research methods and data. First, the paper draws on qualitative data generated from in‐depth interviews and focus group discussions from purposively sampled farmers in the Atankwidi basin. It also draws on a survey conducted on 131 systematically and randomly sampled households in three communities of the basin, namely Yua, Pungu and Mirigu.

Findings

The results show that farmers are planting multiple indigenous drought resilient crop varieties and employing different rounds of seeding and or staggering planting between multiple farms. They are also applying indigenous forms of organic manure, checking soil erosion through grass strips and stone terracing and adopting paddy farming for improving soil and water conservation towards enhancing plant adaptation to drought. The paper therefore, asserts that through conscientious effort, farmers are reducing vulnerability of rain‐fed agriculture to drought through indigenous knowledge systems of drought risk management.

Practical implications

The paper recommends that capacity for managing vulnerability to drought at the local level, including the Atankwidi basin, can be enhanced by incorporating IKS into District Development Planning (DDP) and giving priority to the strategic role of IKS in climate change adaptation planning.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a need for researching the relevance of IKS for reducing vulnerability of rain‐fed agriculture to drought in particular, and enhancing adaptation to climate change in general in the quest for promoting Endogenous Development (ED) in Africa.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Fiona MacVane Phipps

To enable readers to gain an overview of the content of any issue of IJHG and in this way select papers most relevant to their interests or requirements.

Abstract

Purpose

To enable readers to gain an overview of the content of any issue of IJHG and in this way select papers most relevant to their interests or requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

The IJHG review section extracts information from all submissions in a single issue, developing and expanding on key themes in common.

Findings

NA

Originality/value

The original value of the IJHG Review section is that no other Emerald journal includes a Review section of this kind.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Palie Smart, Stefan Hemel, Fiona Lettice, Richard Adams and Stephen Evans

The purpose of this paper is to progress operations management theory and practice by organising contributions to knowledge production, in industrial sustainability, from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to progress operations management theory and practice by organising contributions to knowledge production, in industrial sustainability, from disparate researcher communities. It addresses the principal question “What scholarly dialogues can be explicated in the emerging research field of industrial sustainability?” and sub-questions: what are the descriptive characteristics of the evidence base? and what thematic lines of scientific inquiry underpin the body of knowledge?

Design/methodology/approach

Using an evidenced-based approach, a systematic review (SR) of 574 articles from 62 peer-reviewed scientific journals associated with industrial sustainability is conducted.

Findings

This paper distinguishes three prevailing dialogues in the field of industrial sustainability, and uses Kuhn’s theory of paradigms to propose its pre-paradigmatic scientific status. The three dialogues: “productivity and innovation”, “corporate citizenship” and “economic resilience” are conjectured to privilege efficiency strategies as a mode of incremental reductionism. Industrial sustainability espouses the grand vision of a generative, restorative and net positive economy, and calls for a future research trajectory to address institutional and systemic issues regarding scaling-up and transition, through transformative strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The review is limited by the nature of the inquiries addressed in the literatures by specific researcher communities between 1992 and 2014.

Originality/value

This study performs the first SR in the field of industrial sustainability, synthesises prevailing scholarly dialogues and provides an evaluation of the scientific status of the field.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2015

Joseph Calvin Gagnon and Brian R. Barber

Alternative education settings (AES; i.e., self-contained alternative schools, therapeutic day treatment and residential schools, and juvenile corrections schools) serve…

Abstract

Alternative education settings (AES; i.e., self-contained alternative schools, therapeutic day treatment and residential schools, and juvenile corrections schools) serve youth with complicated and often serious academic and behavioral needs. The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) and practices with Best Available Evidence are necessary to increase the likelihood of long-term success for these youth. In this chapter, we define three primary categories of AES and review what we know about the characteristics of youth in these schools. Next, we discuss the current emphasis on identifying and implementing EBPs with regard to both academic interventions (i.e., reading and mathematics) and interventions addressing student behavior. In particular, we consider implementation in AES, where there are often high percentages of youth requiring special education services and who have a significant need for EBPs to succeed academically, behaviorally, and in their transition to adulthood. We focus our discussion on: (a) examining approaches to identifying EBPs; (b) providing a brief review of EBPs and Best Available Evidence in the areas of mathematics, reading, and interventions addressing student behavior for youth in AES; (c) delineating key implementation challenges in AES; and (d) providing recommendations for how to facilitate the use of EBPs in AES.

Details

Transition of Youth and Young Adults
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-933-2

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Richard E.A. Ashu and Dewald Van Niekerk

A new framework to support the national and local capacity building plan for disaster risk management (DRM) in Cameroon is presented. For the past 30 years, after the…

Abstract

Purpose

A new framework to support the national and local capacity building plan for disaster risk management (DRM) in Cameroon is presented. For the past 30 years, after the general re-organisation of the civil protection department, capacity building programmes for DRM has been solely carried out for and by the Ministry of Territorial Administration and the Department of Civil Protection. The exclusion of businesses, civil society and community participation, among others, has been the main obstacle to capacity building programmes undertaken for DRM. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on interviews conducted among 200 informants by means of a process of participatory monitoring and evaluation as well as a duo capacity building workshop for DRM held in August 2017 in Yaoundé, this paper evaluated existing capacity building programmes for DRM in Cameroon.

Findings

Findings show that the greater portion of government representatives within the public administration lack capacity to address DRM initiatives at the local and national levels of governance. While recommending DRM programmes as a necessity for integration within civil administrative curriculum, this paper proposes six elements to address capacity building gaps for DRM in Cameroon.

Originality/value

The results demonstrate critical gaps in capacity building aimed at DRM, especially where single ministry or department monopolises DRM. The findings provide the government with a useful tool to review its national strategy for a disaster reduction policy and the drawing up of a national intervention plan.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2015

Allan H. Church, Christopher T. Rotolo, Alyson Margulies, Matthew J. Del Giudice, Nicole M. Ginther, Rebecca Levine, Jennifer Novakoske and Michael D. Tuller

Organization development is focused on implementing a planned process of positive humanistic change in organizations through the use of social science theory, action…

Abstract

Organization development is focused on implementing a planned process of positive humanistic change in organizations through the use of social science theory, action research, and data-based feedback methods. The role of personality in that change process, however, has historically been ignored or relegated to a limited set of interventions. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a conceptual overview of the linkages between personality and OD, discuss the current state of personality in the field including key trends in talent management, and offer a new multi-level framework for conceptualizing applications of personality for different types of OD efforts. The chapter concludes with implications for research and practice.

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Frederik Reinder Hak and Karin Sanders

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the adaptation of the principled negotiation approach within organizations demonstrates similarities with the adaptation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that the adaptation of the principled negotiation approach within organizations demonstrates similarities with the adaptation of evidence-based management and is the result of cognitive biases and cultural values instead of specific and conscious choices within the adopted negotiation style.

Design/methodology/approach

The adaptation of principled negotiation and evidence-based management are considered as a lack of willingness to be innovative at the organizational level, and when these ideas are introduced will meet resistance.

Findings

The analysis of the principled negotiation approach as an approach which – similar to evidence-based management – is vulnerable to cognitive biases and cultural values offers a solution on how to effectively adapt this approach within organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for research include a research design to test the assumptions of this paper to consider principled negotiations and evidence-based management approaches as innovative approaches.

Practical implications

Organizations and decision makers within organizations can benefit from the analysis in this paper.

Social implications

Companies and parties in a negotiation phase can benefit from the analysis by paying attention to the cognitive biases and cultural values of the other parties rather than paying attention to the first offer and the choices made in the negotiation.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to analyze principled negotiations from an evidence-based management perspective.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

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