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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Valerie Naquin, Spero Manson, Charles Curie, Shannon Sommer, Ray Daw, Carole Maraku, Nemu Lallu, Dale Meller, Cristy Willer and Edward Deaux

The demand for evidence‐based health practices has created a cultural challenge for Indigenous people around the world. This paper reports on the history and evolution of…

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Abstract

The demand for evidence‐based health practices has created a cultural challenge for Indigenous people around the world. This paper reports on the history and evolution of evidence‐based care into its mainstream status within the behavioural health field. Through the leadership of an Alaska Native tribal organisation, an international forum was convened to address the challenges of evidence‐based practice for Indigenous people. Forum participants developed a model for gathering evidence that integrates rigorous research with Indigenous knowledge and values. The model facilitates development of practices and programmes that are culturally congruent for Indigenous people, accepted and validated by the research community, and deemed supportable by private and governmental sponsors.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2014

Sturla Fossum, John Kjøbli, May Britt Drugli, Bjørn Helge Handegård, Willy-Tore Mørch and Terje Ogden

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the changes in externalising behaviour for young aggressive children differ between two evidence-based parent training (PT…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the changes in externalising behaviour for young aggressive children differ between two evidence-based parent training (PT) programmes after treatment. The treatment formats between these programmes differ, and the authors were particularly interested in whether this influenced the results for participants with co-occurring problems (child variables such as heightened levels of attention and internalising problems, and parental variables such as marital status and education) and the consequent additional risk of poorer treatment outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparison of the individual treatment programme “Parent Management Training – Oregon model” (PMTO) and the group intervention programme “The Incredible Years” (IY) basic training sessions. Outcomes were explored in matched samples from two earlier Norwegian replication studies. The participants were matched on pre-treatment characteristics using a quasi-experimental mis-matching procedure.

Findings

There were no significant differences between the two interventions in parent ratings of externalising behaviours and the lack of differing effects between the two treatments remained when the co-occurring risk factors were introduced into the analyses.

Research limitations/implications

The participants were matched on pre-treatment characteristics using a quasi-experimental mis-matching procedure.

Practical implications

A possible implication of these findings is that parents should be allowed to choose the treatment format of their preference. Further, individual PT may be more appropriate in rural settings with difficulties in forming group interventions.

Social implications

Treatment effects did not differ between these two evidence-based interventions.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge independent comparisons of two evidence-based PT interventions are not previously conducted.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2006

Abram Rosenblatt and Laura Compian

Systems of care and evidence-based practice possess distinct histories. Though each developed out of attempts to improve services to youth with emotional and behavioral…

Abstract

Systems of care and evidence-based practice possess distinct histories. Though each developed out of attempts to improve services to youth with emotional and behavioral disorders, they did so from perspectives so different as to appear diametrically opposed. Service systems exist at multiple levels, including the practice, program, and system levels (Rosenblatt, 1988, 2005; Rosenblatt & Woodbridge, 2003). Research on health and mental health service systems similarly varies, often by level of the service system, with the research methods, independent and dependent variables, populations of interest, and ultimately the consumers of the research product interacting differentially in the creation and understanding of what constitutes a knowledge base for service delivery. Systems of care and, with limited exceptions, evidence-based practices exist at different levels of the service delivery structure, require and derive from different research approaches, and speak to overlapping but historically different audiences.

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Research on Community-Based Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-416-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Liz Brewster, Barbara Sen and Andrew Cox

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the use of self‐help bibliotherapy developed from a local pilot scheme to become national policy in Wales. Analysis aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the use of self‐help bibliotherapy developed from a local pilot scheme to become national policy in Wales. Analysis aims to focus on the use of evidence‐based practice (EBP) as a justification in the process of policy creation.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodological approach was used to gather data, incorporating semi‐structured interviews, documents, and descriptive statistics. Actor‐network theory (ANT) was used as a critical lens to frame analysis.

Findings

The study finds that the translation from local pilot to national initiative was achieved using legitimising discourses including EBP. These discourses were used selectively, and in response to the needs of the focal actors in the network. The complex relationship between EBP and self‐help bibliotherapy is explored in connection with healthcare policy, concluding that the use of EBP legitimises a lack of patient‐centred evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the research include a lack of engagement with patients using the scheme, and future research should aim to present a more patient‐centred account to complement this policy‐focused work.

Originality/value

Little in‐depth work has been conducted on the strategy behind the introduction of bibliotherapy schemes in the UK or elsewhere, and this paper presents an in‐depth theoretical analysis of the first nationwide bibliotherapy scheme in the world.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Gbogboade Ademiluyi, Charlotte E. Rees and Charlotte E. Sheard

This study aimed to evaluate the quality of Internet information on smoking cessation using a cross‐sectional survey design. The characteristics and content of 89 Web…

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the quality of Internet information on smoking cessation using a cross‐sectional survey design. The characteristics and content of 89 Web sites containing smoking cessation information were evaluated. The quality of these sites were measured by the information quality tool (IQT), quality scale (QS) and DISCERN. The most widely reported types of information were the risks of smoking (65.2 per cent of sites) and nicotine replacement therapy (77.8 per cent of sites). Most (59.7 per cent) of the sites containing treatment information were evidence‐based. The Web sites were of variable quality and the quality of sites produced by non‐commercial organisations (e.g. universities) was significantly higher than those produced by commercial organisations (e.g. pharmaceutical companies) and private practices. Sites containing some evidence‐based information had significantly higher quality scores than sites containing no evidence‐based information. These findings have implications for practice and further research and these are discussed in the paper.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Julie A. Deisinger

Students with special needs include children with impaired attention, disruptive behavior, learning disabilities, and developmental disorders, among many other conditions…

Abstract

Students with special needs include children with impaired attention, disruptive behavior, learning disabilities, and developmental disorders, among many other conditions. When a child has been diagnosed with such a disorder, his or her parents may seek treatment that could assist the child to be more academically and socially successful. Numerous interventions exist for the treatment of childhood disorders; however, these treatment methods differ in the types and amounts of evidence supporting their usefulness and effectiveness (Lilienfeld, 2005).

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Current Issues and Trends in Special Education: Identification, Assessment and Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-669-0

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Kimberly J. Vannest and Heather S. Davis

This chapter covers the conceptual framework and presents practical guidelines for using single-case research (SCR) methods to determine evidence-based treatments. We…

Abstract

This chapter covers the conceptual framework and presents practical guidelines for using single-case research (SCR) methods to determine evidence-based treatments. We posit that SCR designs contribute compelling evidence to the knowledge base that is distinct from group design research. When effect sizes are calculated SCR can serve as a reliable indicator of how much behavior change occurs with an intervention in applied settings. Strong SCR design can determine functional relationships and effect sizes with confidence intervals can represent the size and the certainty of the results in a standardized manner. Thus, SCR is unique in retaining data about the individual and individual effects, while also providing data that can be aggregated to identify evidence-based treatments and examine moderator variables.

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Evidence-Based Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-429-9

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Gregory A. Aarons, Elizabeth A. Miller, Amy E. Green, Jennifer A. Perrott and Richard Bradway

Evidence‐based practices (EBPs) are increasingly being implemented in real‐world settings. While intervention effectiveness is dependent on fidelity, interventions are…

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Abstract

Purpose

Evidence‐based practices (EBPs) are increasingly being implemented in real‐world settings. While intervention effectiveness is dependent on fidelity, interventions are often adapted to service settings according to the needs of stakeholders at multiple levels. This study aims to examine the naturalistic implementation of The Incredible Years (IY) parenting programme in a residential substance abuse treatment programme for pregnant and parenting women.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in a residential substance abuse treatment programme serving pregnant and parenting women and their children. Participants included 120 female clients. The primary IY facilitator was a master's level counselling psychologist. In person observations of IY sessions were completed by a trained bachelor's level anthropologist. Ethnographic field notes were collected and then coded in keeping with a priori themes and to identify emergent themes. The Parent Group Leader Checklist was used to evaluate quality and integrity of the IY basic parent programme.

Findings

Quantitative analyses indicate that fidelity varied by type of checklist activity. Specifically, adherence to the IY programme was highest in beginning topic activities, setup, and home activity review, and lowest in role play, vignettes, and wrap‐up activities. Qualitative analyses revealed a number of adaptations in implementation of IY. Adaptations fit into two broad categories: modification of programme delivery and modification of programme content. Within each of these categories modifications included organisation‐driven adaptations, provider‐driven adaptations, and consumer‐driven adaptations.

Practical implications

Changes to evidence‐based practice generally take two forms – adaptations consistent with model intent and theoretical approach and changes that represent drift from core elements of the EBP. The challenge for implementation science is to develop frameworks in which models can be adapted enough to make them viable for the service context (or the service context adapted to fit the model), yet avoid drift and maintain fidelity. Attending to the complexities of adaptation prior to and during implementation in a planned way is likely to help organisations better utilise EBPs to meet their unique needs while maintaining fidelity.

Originality/value

The paper shows that identification of types of intervention adaptations and drift allows for consideration of systematic approaches, frameworks, and processes to increase adherence during EBP implementation in community mental health and substance abuse treatment settings.

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Kerri Eagle, Trevor Ma and Barbara Sinclair

The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of an evidence-based and effective rehabilitation programme to address substance use disorders in a population of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of an evidence-based and effective rehabilitation programme to address substance use disorders in a population of patients with severe mental illness and mental disorders detained in a secure forensic psychiatric facility. A clinical review identified a high prevalence of substance use disorders in the patient population at a secure forensic facility in Sydney, Australia with only a limited number of patients being assessed and offered interventions for substance use problems.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was undertaken specifically looking at articles between 2009 and 2017 that considered models of care or approaches to substance use rehabilitation in patients with co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Articles were considered based on their relevance to the purpose and the environment of a secure forensic facility.

Findings

The literature review emphasised the need for a cohesive model of care integrating substance use rehabilitation with mental health care. Comprehensive assessment and individualised approaches that incorporated patient choice and stages of change were considered essential components to any dual diagnosis rehabilitation programme.

Practical implications

The literature regarding rehabilitation approaches for those with severe mental illness and co-morbid substance use disorders was reasonably consistent with the models of care used in relation to criminal offenders and mental illness generally. Integrated and individualised rehabilitation approaches for dual diagnosis patients could play a significant role in forensic settings.

Originality/value

Limited robust evidence for substance use rehabilitation has been published. The authors consider the existing evidence base and the underlying theory behind substance use rehabilitation to propose a model for rehabilitation in secure forensic settings. This is the first known review of substance use rehabilitation involving mentally ill offenders with dual diagnoses in secure forensic settings. This paper is the original work of the authors.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Terje Ogden, Kristine Hagen and Oddbjørn Andersen

In order to examine the sustainability of programme effectiveness, we investigated whether the effects of multisystemic treatment (MST) on a second group of adolescents…

Abstract

In order to examine the sustainability of programme effectiveness, we investigated whether the effects of multisystemic treatment (MST) on a second group of adolescents would match those reported in an earlier randomised controlled trial (RCT). Pre‐ and post‐treatment assessments were analysed in a participant group of 105; 55 youths were referred to MST in the programme's second year of operation (MST2), and 50 youths were included in the RCT the first year in which 30 were randomly assigned to MST (MST1) and 20 to regular services (RS).At two project sites, MST clinical outcomes in the second year of programme operation matched and, for key indices of anti‐social behaviour, surpassed those achieved during the first year. In addition the MST treatment delivered in the second year was more effective than regular child welfare services in preventing out of home placement and reducing internalising and externalising behaviour. Together, these results demonstrated sustained effectiveness of the programme as well as indication of programme maturation effects. No group differences were registered for social competence. MST youths treated in the second year were significantly younger than those referred to treatment in the first year (MST1) but age had no moderating effect on the outcomes.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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