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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Ursula Reichenpfader, Siw Carlfjord and Per Nilsen

This study aims to systematically review published empirical research on leadership as a determinant for the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) and to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to systematically review published empirical research on leadership as a determinant for the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) and to investigate leadership conceptualization and operationalization in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. Relevant electronic bibliographic databases and reference lists of pertinent review articles were searched. To be included, a study had to involve empirical research and refer to both leadership and EBP in health care. Study quality was assessed with a structured instrument based on study design.

Findings

A total of 17 studies were included. Leadership was mostly viewed as a modifier for implementation success, acting through leadership support. Yet, there was definitional imprecision as well as conceptual inconsistency, and studies seemed to inadequately address situational and contextual factors. Although referring to an organizational factor, the concept was mostly analysed at the individual or group level.

Research limitations/implications

The concept of leadership in implementation science seems to be not fully developed. It is unclear whether attempts to tap the concept of leadership in available instruments truly capture and measure the full range of the diverse leadership elements at various levels. Research in implementation science would benefit from a better integration of research findings from other disciplinary fields. Once a more mature concept has been established, researchers in implementation science could proceed to further elaborate operationalization and measurement.

Originality/value

Although the relevance of leadership in implementation science has been acknowledged, the conceptual base of leadership in this field has received only limited attention.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Abstract

Details

Knowledge Management for Leadership and Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-045-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Valerie Naquin, Spero Manson, Charles Curie, Shannon Sommer, Ray Daw, Carole Maraku, Nemu Lallu, Dale Meller, Cristy Willer and Edward Deaux

The demand for evidence‐based health practices has created a cultural challenge for Indigenous people around the world. This paper reports on the history and evolution of…

Abstract

The demand for evidence‐based health practices has created a cultural challenge for Indigenous people around the world. This paper reports on the history and evolution of evidence‐based care into its mainstream status within the behavioural health field. Through the leadership of an Alaska Native tribal organisation, an international forum was convened to address the challenges of evidence‐based practice for Indigenous people. Forum participants developed a model for gathering evidence that integrates rigorous research with Indigenous knowledge and values. The model facilitates development of practices and programmes that are culturally congruent for Indigenous people, accepted and validated by the research community, and deemed supportable by private and governmental sponsors.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Erwin Schwella

The purpose of this paper is to argue that effective and ethical governance and government can and should benefit from many influences and inputs. These influences and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that effective and ethical governance and government can and should benefit from many influences and inputs. These influences and inputs, in the form of evidence, information, knowledge and informed public participation contribute to the quality and legitimacy of government analysis and action.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach in this viewpoint is to use persuasive communication in an advocacy and illustrative way to introduce learning governance as an approach to governance.

Findings

The viewpoint states the case for the usefulness and relevance of evidence and ideas based learning governance linked to learning leadership in governance for effective and ethical leadership in governance.

Originality/value

The value of the viewpoint is to stimulate and elicit discussion and debate on learning governance and leadership as approach to governance leadership.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Renée J. Mitchell and Stuart Lewis

The purpose of this paper is to argue that police research has reached a level of acceptance such that executive management has an ethical obligation to their communities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that police research has reached a level of acceptance such that executive management has an ethical obligation to their communities to use evidence-based practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) framework the authors apply an ethical-based decision-making model to policing decisions. EBM does not allow physicians to ignore research when giving guidance to patients. The authors compare the two professional approaches to decision making and argue policing has reached a level of research that if ignored, just like medicine, should be considered unethical. Police interventions can potentially be harmful. Rather than do no harm, the authors argue that police managers should implement practices that are the least harmful based on the current research.

Findings

The authors found policing has a substantial amount of research showing what works, what does not, and what looks promising to allow police executives to make decisions based on evidence rather than tradition, culture, or best practice. There is a deep enough fund of knowledge to enable law enforcement leadership to evaluate policies on how well the policies and procedures they enforce prevent crime with a minimum of harm to the communities they are sworn to protect and serve.

Originality/value

Policing has yet to view community interventions as potentially harmful. Realigning police ethics from a lying, cheating, stealing, lens to a “doing the least harm” lens can alter the practitioner’s view of why evidence-based policing is important. Viewing executive decision from an evidence-based ethical platform is the future of evaluating police executive decisions.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Nathan S Hartman, Scott J Allen and Rosanna F Miguel

The purpose of this paper is to explore how educators can benefit from data on teaching methods or sources of learning used for the leader development of undergraduate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how educators can benefit from data on teaching methods or sources of learning used for the leader development of undergraduate students. To advance the field, the authors contend that programs for leader development need to clearly identify what area of development is being improved (e.g. conceptual understanding, personal growth, skill building, feedback), intentionally build connections toward those objectives for development, and incorporate experience within the structure of undergraduate education to facilitate better outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Ratings on the teaching methods used by participants with experience facilitating leader development activities for undergraduate students were solicited in an online survey. Each participant (n=66) responded to questions about 25 sources of learning for leader development. Questions asked the degree to which each source of learning provided the learning outcomes of conceptual understanding, feedback, skill building, and/or personal growth to undergraduate students.

Findings

Participants perceived small group discussion, and film/television clips to promote conceptual understanding, while internships and 360-degree feedback did so to a lesser degree. Sources of learning perceived to facilitate skill building were group projects, and giving presentations. Conversely, completing case studies and listening to lectures were rated as unlikely to foster personal growth.

Originality/value

The results can help educators make a more informed decision about the adoption of teaching methods for leader development. Hopefully, this practice will create standardization in undergraduate leader development that researchers have asked for and serve as a platform for recommending timetables and sources of learning that better define the what and how of leader development. Likewise, these findings benefit industry, because strong parallels to both the content and techniques used in industry and by universities exist.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2017

Linda Dudar, Shelleyann Scott and Donald E. Scott

Abstract

Details

Accelerating Change in Schools: Leading Rapid, Successful, and Complex Change Initiatives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-502-7

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2009

Helen Lockett

There is an established international evidence base on supported employment for people with severe and enduring mental health problems, and now a growing evidence base on…

Abstract

There is an established international evidence base on supported employment for people with severe and enduring mental health problems, and now a growing evidence base on how to successfully implement this into practice. The process involves substantial organisational development and change, and therefore effective leadership is critical. This article outlines some of the challenges to implementing supported employment services and explores what recent leadership theory could contribute to this process, as the Sainsbury Centre embarks on its Centres of Excellence Programme in England and seeks to build a wider learning community from our partnerships formed through the International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership (IIMHL).

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Allan Walker and Terrence Quong

This chapter targets the learning of middle leaders working in the rapidly expanding international school sector in the Asia-Pacific Region. It draws on three externally…

Abstract

This chapter targets the learning of middle leaders working in the rapidly expanding international school sector in the Asia-Pacific Region. It draws on three externally commissioned impact studies of Leading Upstream (LU) – a purpose-designed 12-month part-time, leader learning program. The program runs in Hong Kong for middle leaders from 20 primary and secondary schools that make up a semigovernment education system. The main aim of the program was to scale up individual, team, and school capacity through a structured learning network design. Since 2005/2006, the program has completed four cohorts. The authors present an analysis of the impact of a connected series of the same program to draw insights that may inform program development for middle leaders. The heart of the chapter focuses on the authors’ attempts to synthesize the outcomes of the three impact studies. Data patterns from across the studies were analyzed to identify common patterns. Patterns determined were divided into personal, team/school, and system impact. Among the former is ‘increased confidence in self as leader” and the later the fragility of even moderately broad networks when learning hits the realities of school.

Details

Global Perspectives on Educational Leadership Reform: The Development and Preparation of Leaders of Learning and Learners of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-445-1

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Robert Holmberg, Mats Fridell, Patrick Arnesson and Mia Bäckvall

This paper seeks to investigate the role of leadership styles in the implementation of evidence‐based treatment methods (EBP) for drug abuse and criminal behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the role of leadership styles in the implementation of evidence‐based treatment methods (EBP) for drug abuse and criminal behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a triangulation approach through mail questionnaires to 112 treatment personnel (49 per cent response rate), interviews with 65 employees and managers, observations and feedback workshops.

Findings

Responses from treatment personnel involved in the implementation of EBP indicated that their views on their immediate superior's leadership behaviour was significantly related to the perceptions of organisational innovative climate, job satisfaction and work output. Problems with workload, lack of collegial and managerial support and a low priority given to the programmes and treatment integrity were the most common barriers to implementation of the programmes. Effective managers were providing space, time and opportunity for the staff to perform their treatment‐related tasks and to be creative during the implementation process. This functional space had to be continually protected, both vertically from demands from higher levels of the organisation and horizontally from non‐helpful colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

The correlational design used in this study does not permit conclusions about causality.

Practical implications

Implementation of evidence‐based treatment programmes in clinical settings should pay attention to the impact of leadership styles on the experiences of treatment staff (climate, job‐satisfaction, burnout) and programme outcome. These variables should also be considered in the evaluation of treatment effects. The process of implementation can be seen as a route for learning and innovation, and managers should pay attention to the facilitation of these processes.

Originality/value

The role of leadership in implementation concerns not only production and structure but also learning, creativity and persistency during the process. The triangulation approach in this study also sheds light on the limitations of questionnaires in capturing the dynamics of leadership in human service organisations.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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