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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Tor W. Andreassen and Even J. Lanseng

Service‐dominant logic of marketing claims that employees' knowledge and skills are the firm's only sustainable advantage. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the…

Abstract

Purpose

Service‐dominant logic of marketing claims that employees' knowledge and skills are the firm's only sustainable advantage. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the importance of branding in attracting the right employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs the image congruency hypothesis and social norms from consumer behavior. To test the hypotheses empirically, it uses a scenario‐based survey of respondents recruited from job‐seeking graduate students.

Findings

Based on data sampled and analyzed, it finds that both image congruency between prospective employee and preferred employer and social norm weigh in when job seekers decide on the preferred employer.

Research limitations/implications

The paper tests the model only on first‐time job seekers. This group may have greater desire to find a job than employed job seekers do. However, it believes that image congruency and social norm will impact the latter group's attitudes regarding employer.

Practical implications

For managers who need to differentiate their market offering the findings illuminate the importance of branding and brand building not only in the consumer market but also in the labor market. It is all about attracting the right customers and moreover, the right employees to serve them.

Originality/value

To the knowledge, this is the first study in the field of employer branding that uses the image congruency hypothesis to study branding in the labor market, thereby linking branding to organizational behavior.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Even J. Lanseng and Tor W. Andreassen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the introduction of self‐service technology (SST) in health diagnosis as a means to reduce costs and improve quality in the health…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the introduction of self‐service technology (SST) in health diagnosis as a means to reduce costs and improve quality in the health care sector – at the same time.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with an internet‐based medical self‐diagnosis application as the focal technology is conducted. The research hypotheses are tested by using a scenario and questionnaire approach, in which respondents prior to responding read a scenario.

Findings

To test the hypotheses, structural equation modeling using LISREL was performed. It was found that the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) for users, described according to the Technology Readiness Index (TRI) as pioneers, has a very good ability to predict future behavioral intent. TAM has an excellent capability to predict future behavioral intent of this new application in this new context, i.e. health care services.

Research limitations/implications

The paper only tests TAM for a given population described as pioneers. Future research should test for other categories of users, as this may impact different drivers of behavioral intent/adoption in the TAM.

Practical implications

For policy makers (e.g. politicians), this study has great implications as it documents a methodology of testing a population's receptiveness to new technology – technology that can greatly improve quality, costs and satisfaction issues with government services and reduce risk when implementing the new service.

Originality/value

In the context of increased healthcare spending and possibly unsustainable healthcare‐funding models, the current research investigated people's readiness and attitude toward performing self‐diagnosis which may offer a patient‐centered access to health services. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this has never been done before.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2018

Jeremy S. Wolter, V. Myles Landers, Simon Brach and J. Joseph Cronin

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether customer-company identification (CCI) can transfer from one organization to the next within the context of service alliances.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether customer-company identification (CCI) can transfer from one organization to the next within the context of service alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment using a fictitious alliance and a field study focused on a real alliance tests identification transfer at the time of a service alliance announcement and while the service alliance is in operation.

Findings

Identification transfer is enabled by an exclusive service alliance but not an inclusive one. For identification transfer to be maintained, customers must perceive the companies as a coherent group (i.e. high entitativity) and have close physical proximity to the alliance.

Originality/value

By drawing heavily on self-categorization theory for the proposed effects, the current research provides a new theoretical framework to the service and brand alliance literature that contrasts with the attitude-based theories commonly used. Furthermore, the current research explores how company-company relationships influence CCI whereas most research has focused on characteristics of the customer-company relationship. These two differences suggest service alliances provide more value to the companies and customers than currently realized.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Eija Vaittinen, Miia Martinsuo and Roland Ortt

For successful servitization, manufacturing firms must understand how their customers adopt new services. The purpose of this paper is to explore customers’ readiness for…

Abstract

Purpose

For successful servitization, manufacturing firms must understand how their customers adopt new services. The purpose of this paper is to explore customers’ readiness for a manufacturer’s new services to complement its goods. The goal is to increase knowledge of the aspects that manufacturers should consider when bringing new kinds of services to market.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study design is used to analyze readiness for services and interest in service adoption in three customer firms of a manufacturer. The interview data were collected from 14 persons at customer sites and were content analyzed.

Findings

The results show that readiness – a concept that is often used in the field of technology – is relevant also for the service adoption process. In a business-to-business context, readiness for service adoption concerns the individual and organizational levels, and hence a new dimension of organizational culture and habits had to be added to the concept that originally focuses on individuals. People consider different factors when making consecutive decisions during the service adoption process and these factors can vary even within a company. The cornerstone for new service adoption is the customer firm’s actual need for the service.

Originality/value

The results offer new knowledge about service adoption in a business-to-business context by taking a customer firm’s perspective. They, thus, complement previous studies on the supplier perspective of servitization and service adoption in consumer business. The contributions help manufacturers focus their efforts when bringing new services to market.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

M. Deniz Dalman and Kartikeya Puranam

Prior research in ingredient branding (IB) has identified several important decision variables consumers use when evaluating IB alliances. This exploratory research aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research in ingredient branding (IB) has identified several important decision variables consumers use when evaluating IB alliances. This exploratory research aims to investigate the relationship between these variables and consumers’ buying likelihood of the IB alliance and the relative importance of these variables for low- vs high-involvement product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

A study with the participation of 458 mTurkers was conducted and the data were analyzed using random forests.

Findings

Findings reveal relative importance of different variables for an IB alliance and that these differ for low- vs high-involvement categories.

Research limitations/implications

Being exploratory in nature, this research has several limitations, such as using only one high- and one low-involvement categories.

Practical implications

Results of this research will help brand managers as they make decisions entering an IB alliance as well as with investing their budget on different aspects of their brand, and tailoring their marketing activities for low- vs high-involvement product categories.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to discuss the relative importance of different decision variables in an IB context empirically.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Carolien de Blok, Katrien Luijkx, Bert Meijboom and Jos Schols

The purpose of this paper is to show how modularity manifests in a service context, more specifically in the provision of care and services to independently living elderly.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how modularity manifests in a service context, more specifically in the provision of care and services to independently living elderly.

Design/methodology/approach

Four case studies provide insight into the specification of relevant components and their subsequent assembly into a customized package of care and services.

Findings

In all cases, component specification and package construction take place in two phases: partly before and partly during care delivery. Early client involvement allows for a combination of standard components that have a lower level of customization, whereas late client involvement allows for adaptation of these components resulting in a higher level of customization. The paper proposes that modularity theory should distinguish between the creation of modular offerings in care provision versus their creation in goods production, since the findings are the exact reverse of the state‐of‐the art knowledge in manufacturing modularity.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical part of this paper is limited to providers of elderly care and services in The Netherlands and is exploratory in nature. However, the newness of care and service modularity justifies the exploratory research approach.

Practical implications

This paper offers elderly care organizations in‐depth understanding of their complex and multi‐faceted specification process. The insights help both care and service providers to make well‐considered decisions as to what level of client involvement to allow and the type of modularity to apply.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the emerging literature on service modularity.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Chanthika Pornpitakpan and Yizhou Yuan

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of perceived product similarity and comparative ad claims on brand responses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of perceived product similarity and comparative ad claims on brand responses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a two (similarity between the target product and the comparison product: relatively similar vs dissimilar) by three (product attributes of the target product: common to the comparison product, distinct from the comparison product, and a combination of common and distinct attributes) between-subjects factorial design with 300 Thai undergraduate students.

Findings

It finds that when perceived similarity between the products is high, a combination of superiority (distinct) and parity (common) ad claims lead to the best brand responses. When perceived similarity is low, superiority claims bring about the best brand responses.

Research limitations/implications

It extends comparative advertising and category-substitution research by addressing the research gaps in perceived similarity and claim type.

Practical implications

Companies should emphasize a product’s superior attributes in general but a combination of common and superior attributes when the product is relatively similar to other products in comparative advertising.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence that perceived product similarity moderates the effect of comparative ad claims on brand responses.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Even Johan Lanseng and Lars Erling Olsen

Previous research demonstrates the importance of product category fit in evaluating brand alliances. However, many factors determine fit between alliance partners. For…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research demonstrates the importance of product category fit in evaluating brand alliances. However, many factors determine fit between alliance partners. For example, conclusions from brand extension research suggest that the evaluation is a question not only of product category fit, but also of brand concept consistency. Therefore, this study introduces brand concept consistency in research on brand alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on the categorization and incongruence literature. An experiment was employed to test the two hypotheses in the study.

Findings

The results indicate that both product category fit and brand concept consistency influence consumers' evaluations. However, the results also show that product category fit is important in only functional and mixed‐brand concept‐based alliances. For expressive brand alliances, product category fit is not important in evaluating the alliance.

Practical implications

Managers should take care in finding potential alliance partners who have brands that in some way, either on the product category level or in brand concept, fit well with their company's brands. However, managers of a functional brand should find a partner whose brand has high product category fit, since low‐fit partners presumably will hurt the potential alliance.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that brand concept consistency, not only product category fit, is an important variable in consumer evaluations of brand alliances.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Anna Essén

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for studying the process of technology‐based service system innovation from a broad perspective using an approach that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for studying the process of technology‐based service system innovation from a broad perspective using an approach that elucidates the non‐linear facets of this process. The framework draws on Lévy‐Strauss's concept of bricolage, which implies that individuals' “making do with resources at hand,” as opposed to managerial visions, can trigger innovation. This concept is combined with the notion of technological drift and with a model of emergentism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses case study data from the Swedish elderly homecare setting.

Findings

The findings illustrate how the emergence of technology‐based care services can be triggered by an injection of energy in terms of a new technological resource being made available in an organization, proceeding as a continuous interaction between personnel repurposing and recombining resources at hand, positive and negative feedback dynamics, institutional regulations and culture‐related stabilizing mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

New services can arise as a result of a number of efforts and events that, in isolation, might appear insignificant. Taken together, and interacting with enabling and constraining forces that promote the emergence of certain new services and prevent others, such acts and events generate unpredictable outcomes. The result may be incremental but by no means trivial innovations.

Originality/value

The paper suggests an approach to innovation that complements conventional thinking in the new service development literature. The proposed framework can help to explain how and why certain new services emerge and why others do not in unexpected and unpredictable ways.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Jian Mou, Dong-Hee Shin and Jason Cohen

The purpose of this paper is to help understand consumer acceptance of online health information services by integrating the health belief model and extended valence framework.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help understand consumer acceptance of online health information services by integrating the health belief model and extended valence framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory-based, experimental-scenarios research design is used to collect data, and the structural equation modeling technique is used to test the research model.

Findings

The model explains 47.6 percent of the variance in intentions to use online health information services. Trust appeared to have the strongest effect on acceptance. Perceived risk also had a significant impact on acceptance. Furthermore, health belief variables are confirmed as important factors for consumer acceptance. Self-efficacy was found to moderate the effect of perceived severity on acceptance.

Research limitations/implications

This study helped identify the relative salience of the health belief model and extended valence framework in consumer acceptance of online health information services.

Practical implications

This study can help practitioners better understand the development of trust and the profiles of consumers who may browse their sites. When online health service providers promote their information to encourage potential online health information seekers, they should use countermeasures against risk perceptions.

Originality/value

This study attempted to extend the valence framework to the non-commercial service context. Moreover, health beliefs and the valence framework are two fundamental aspects that health information seekers consider when making decisions about online health services.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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