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Article

Remy Low, Eve Mayes and Helen Proctor

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a broad theoretical orientation for the themed section of History of Education Review, “Unstable concepts in the history of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a broad theoretical orientation for the themed section of History of Education Review, “Unstable concepts in the history of Australian schooling: radicalism, religion, migration”. Through the conceptual frame of “contrapuntal historiography”, it commends the practice of re-looking at taken-for-granted concepts and re-readings of the cultural archive of Australian schooling, with especial attention to silences, discontinuities and the movements of concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on Edward Said’s approach of “contrapuntal reading”, this paper refers to the recent work of Bruce Pascoe as an exemplar of this practice in the field of Australian history. It then relates this approach to the study of the history of Australian schooling as demonstrated in the three papers that make up the themed section “Unstable concepts in the history of Australian schooling: radicalism, religion, migration”.

Findings

Following in the style of Said’s contrapuntal reading and the example of Pascoe’s work, this paper argues that there are inerasable traces of historical politics – that is, the records of constitutive exclusions and silences – which “haunt” taken-for-granted concepts like the migrant, the secular and the radical in the history of Australian schooling.

Originality/value

Taken alongside the three papers in the themed section, this paper urges the proliferation of different theoretical and disciplinary approaches in order to think anew about silences, discontinuities and movements of concepts as a counterpoint to dominant narrative lines in the history of Australian education.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article

Eve Mayes

The purpose of this paper is to consider historical shifts in the mobilisation of the concept of radical in relation to Australian schooling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider historical shifts in the mobilisation of the concept of radical in relation to Australian schooling.

Design/methodology/approach

Two texts composed at two distinct points in a 40-year period in Australia relating to radicalism and education are strategically juxtaposed. These texts are: the first issue of the Radical Education Dossier (RED, 1976), and the Attorney General Department’s publication Preventing Violent Extremism and Radicalisation in Australia (PVERA, 2015). The analysis of the term radical in these texts is influenced by Raymond Williams’s examination of particular keywords in their historical and contemporary contexts.

Findings

Across these two texts, radical is deployed as adjective for a process of interrogating structured inequalities of the economy and employment, and as individualised noun attached to the “vulnerable” young person.

Social implications

Reading the first issue of RED alongside the PVERA text suggests the consequences of the reconstitution of the role of schools, teachers and the re-positioning of certain young people as “vulnerable”. The juxtaposition of these two texts surfaces contemporary patterns of the therapeutisation of political concerns.

Originality/value

A methodological contribution is offered to historical sociological analyses of shifts and continuities of the role of the school in relation to society.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article

Helen Proctor

Despite Australia’s history as an exemplary migrant nation, there are gaps in the literature and a lack of explicit conceptualisation of either “migrants” or “migration”…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite Australia’s history as an exemplary migrant nation, there are gaps in the literature and a lack of explicit conceptualisation of either “migrants” or “migration” in the Australian historiography of schooling. The purpose of this paper is to seek out traces of migration history that nevertheless exist in the historiography, despite the apparent silences.

Design/methodology/approach

Two foundational yet semi-forgotten twentieth-century historical monographs are re-interpreted to support a rethinking of the relationship between migration and settler colonialism in the history and historiography of Australian schooling.

Findings

These texts, from their different school system (state/Catholic) orientations, are, it is argued, replete with accounts of migration despite their apparent gaps, if read closely. Within them, nineteenth-century British migrants are represented as essentially entitled constituents of the protonation. This is a very different framing from twentieth century histories of migrants as minority or “other”.

Originality/value

Instead of an academic reading practice that dismisses and simply supersedes old work, this paper proposes that fresh engagements with texts from the past can yield new insights into the connections between migration, schooling and colonialism. It argues that the historiography of Australian schooling should not simply be expanded to include or encompass the stories of “migrants” within a “minority studies” framework, although there is plenty of useful work yet to be accomplished in that area, but should be re-examined as having been about migration all along.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Book part

Wayne A Hochwarter

They say Eve tempted Adam with an apple. But man I ain’t going for that.Pink Cadillac – Bruce SpringsteenAll through history, individuals have spent considerable effort…

Abstract

They say Eve tempted Adam with an apple. But man I ain’t going for that. Pink Cadillac – Bruce SpringsteenAll through history, individuals have spent considerable effort attempting to influence the behaviors and beliefs of others. As a principal issue in psychology (Forgas & Williams, 2001), social influence processes have been the subject of inquiry for a considerable length of time (Sherif, 1936) while Peterson (2001) argued that the manner in which individuals manipulate others represents the very core of social psychology. Extensive reviews of the social influence literature (e.g. Cialdini & Trost, 1998; Forgas & Williams, 2001) elucidate its powerful role in virtually all work and non-work domains.

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

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Article

Christos V. Fotopoulos, Dimitrios P. Kafetzopoulos and Evangelos L. Psomas

The purpose of this paper is to assess the critical factors of effective implementation (CFEI) of the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points (HACCP) system and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the critical factors of effective implementation (CFEI) of the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points (HACCP) system and to define the underlying structure among them. Having defined the latent constructs of the critical factors, the paper also aims to explore their impact on the HACCP effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project was carried out in 107 Greek food companies. The data collection method used in this study was that of the questionnaire. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis were applied to assess the reliability and validity of the latent constructs of the critical factors, while their impact on the HACCP effectiveness was examined through the multiple linear regression analysis.

Findings

Data analysis revealed that the latent constructs of the critical factors such as a company's attributes (prerequisite programmes, equipment and verification procedures) and the human resource attributes (employees' availability, commitment, training and will) are of major importance in implementing an effective HACCP system. According to the findings, these latent constructs have also significant impact on the achievement of the system's aims regarding the identification, assessment and the control of food‐borne safety hazards.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size, the diversity of the food companies participated in this study and the subjective character of the data constitute the limitations of the present study. However, these limitations suggest future research orientations.

Practical implications

The food companies are supposed to implement a food safety management system, because of either internal or external reasons. However, the system's effectiveness is a parameter that should be assured. This study gives directions in order for the companies to fully achieve the HACCP systems' aims through the management of the critical factors' impact.

Originality value

This paper assesses the critical factors' importance in implementing an effective HACCP system and defines a reliable and valid structure among them identifying the broader dimensions to which they are summarized. In doing so, latent constructs are used as predictors of the HACCP effectiveness.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article

Joanna Trafialek and Wojciech Kolanowski

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of the functioning of HACCP principles in certified and non-certified food businesses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of the functioning of HACCP principles in certified and non-certified food businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected by audits made in 40 food businesses of various food industry sectors. All food businesses were located in Poland where the HACCP system is obligatory. Half of the evaluated businesses implemented one or more private voluntary certified standards. The audit form contained 134 detailed questions covering 12 steps and seven principles of HACCP implementation and functioning. The obtained results were analyzed using a t-test, Spearman’s test, and cluster analysis.

Findings

The overall assessment of the HACCP principles in certified food businesses was higher than in non-certified ones. However, the functioning of HACCP principles in practice was assessed much lower than the system implementation in all business groups, despite certification and the type of food industry. In each of the food industry sectors both implementation and functioning of HACCP principles were evaluated higher in certified than in non-certified food businesses. Further research is needed to explain why, despite certification, the functioning of the mandatory HACCP principles is often incomplete and what factors affect the correct operation, as well as if these are sufficient to ensure food safety.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this research is a small sample of only 40 food businesses of various food industry sectors located in Poland. Due to the small sample, the research should be considered as the preliminary or scoping study. Although the method applied in the study allowed rapid evaluation of implementation and functioning of HACCP principles in food businesses, more work and analyses should be done for its reliability and validity.

Practical implications

The obtained results gave a lot of practical information, e.g.: first, the overall assessment of the HACCP principles in the certified food businesses is higher than that in the non-certified ones; second, the functioning of the HACCP principles in practice is weaker than the system implementation despite certification; third, in some cases the passing certification schemes do not result in a company having excellent food safety practices; and fourth, the applied method allows rapid evaluation of implementation and functioning of HACCP principles. However, more work and analyses should be done for its reliability and validity.

Social implications

It is believed that certification strengthens HACCP functioning in food businesses. However, the study has shown that functioning of HACCP principles in practice was assessed much lower than the system implementation in all business groups, despite certification and the type of food industry. This indicate that even in certified food businesses HACCP functioning is often incomplete, which may have an impact on food safety.

Originality/value

The paper presents additional and detailed data on the functioning of HACCP principles in certified and non-certified food business. Despite certification and the type of food industry sector, the functioning of HACCP principles in practice was assessed much lower than the system implementation in all business groups. The method applied in this study allowed rapid evaluation of implementation and functioning of HACCP principles in food businesses. However, more work and analyses should be done for its reliability and validity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Kostas Milios, Pantelis E. Zoiopoulos, Angelos Pantouvakis, Marios Mataragas and Eleftherios H. Drosinos

The aim of this study is to evaluate the food safety management system (HACCP – type system) implemented in Greek food businesses, examine the techno-managerial factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to evaluate the food safety management system (HACCP – type system) implemented in Greek food businesses, examine the techno-managerial factors influencing its application according to enterprises' opinion and correlate these answers to the HACCP evaluation results.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved 33 slaughterhouses located throughout Greece. Two types of questionnaires were used (IF questionnaire – for the influencing factors and HE questionnaire – for HACCP evaluation). Reliability or item analysis and principal component analysis were applied to the data obtained from the survey.

Findings

The results showed that the companies identifying the benefits of HACCP implementation as very important have fully understood possible problems and had the best results as regards HACCP evaluation. Companies not identifying the benefits as important had poor score in HACCP evaluation. Businesses with HACCP certification for longer periods and especially those that were certified according to more than one standard had better performance in HACCP evaluation. In addition, slaughterhouses involved in rearing of animals as well, especially those slaughtering only one animal species, and which do not provide services for others, seem to have better performance as regards HACCP evaluation.

Originality/value

The findings of this study correlate the results of the HACCP evaluation with the factors that affect the implementation of a food safety management system using the hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) statistical technique.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Keith Mayes

With the IR Act still the subject of seething discontent among Britain's trade unionists, Keith Mayes takes a timely look at the US Taft‐Hartley laws, aimed at putting a…

Abstract

With the IR Act still the subject of seething discontent among Britain's trade unionists, Keith Mayes takes a timely look at the US Taft‐Hartley laws, aimed at putting a rein on the power of organised labour. He reports that they have fallen largely into disuse as more and more workers—among them professional people hitherto against the idea of unions—see the need for collective strength.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Book part

Douglas H. Constance, William H. Friedland, Marie-Christine Renard and Marta G. Rivera-Ferre

This introduction provides an overview of the discourse on alternative agrifood movements (AAMs) to (1) ascertain the degree of convergence and divergence around a common…

Abstract

This introduction provides an overview of the discourse on alternative agrifood movements (AAMs) to (1) ascertain the degree of convergence and divergence around a common ethos of alterity and (2) context the chapters of the book. AAMs have increased in recent years in response to the growing legitimation crisis of the conventional agrifood system. Some agrifood researchers argue that AAMs represent the vanguard movement of our time, a formidable counter movement to global capitalism. Other authors note a pattern of blunting of the transformative qualities of AAMs due to conventionalization and mainstreaming in the market. The literature on AAMs is organized following a Four Questions in Agrifood Studies (Constance, 2008) framework. The section for each Question ends with a case study to better illustrate the historical dynamics of an AAM. The literature review ends with a summary of the discourse applied to the research question of the book: Are AAMs the vanguard social movement of our time? The last section of this introduction provides a short description of each contributing chapter of the book, which is divided into five sections: Introduction; Theoretical and Conceptual Framings; Food Sovereignty Movements; Alternative Movements in the Global North; and Conclusions.

Details

Alternative Agrifood Movements: Patterns of Convergence and Divergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-089-6

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Article

Ahmed al Janahi and David Weir

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These…

Abstract

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These assume that certain fundamental elements of financial rationality guide the intervention of banks and financial institutions in situations of incipient business failure. This study is based on an empirical analysis of companies in the GCC region of companies which are clients of banks which operate within the frameworks of the Islamic Banking System in the Arab Middle East. A “sharp‐bending” orientation rather than a “business failure” model is used and conclusions are reached about the role of the banks and other financial institutions and their methods of managing difficult client situations. Some typical situations relating to problem loans, loan officers’ responses and behaviour and out comes are reviewed. The role of the bank in triggering early problem‐recognition is described and the response of the bank, subsequent actions and the sequence of recovery are described. Procedures and actions which would be regarded as “irrational” in a western cultural context are interpretable as “rational” within different cultural frameworks. We argue that there is no one universally‐accepted frame work of business rationality, and that “financial rationalities” are the product of deeply‐embedded cultural frames of reference.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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