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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Joyce Yen, Eve A. Riskin, Cara Margherio, Jan H. Spyridakis, Coleen M. Carrigan and Ana Mari Cauce

The advancement of equity, diversity and inclusion in higher education is dependent on institutional culture changes in academia. Faculty equity, diversity and inclusion…

Abstract

Purpose

The advancement of equity, diversity and inclusion in higher education is dependent on institutional culture changes in academia. Faculty equity, diversity and inclusion efforts must engage departmental leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the growth and expansion of the ADVANCE leadership program at the University of Washington (UW) for department chairs that was designed to provide department chairs the skills, community and information needed to be agents of change within the academy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper chronicles the program’s growth from a campus-based workshop program to national workshops (LEAD) to a web-based toolkit (LiY!) to support institutions in running their own UW ADVANCE-inspired leadership workshops.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the success of each growth stage and the expansion of program impact.

Practical implications

The paper offers recommendations for growing a model from a local to national scale and adapting the described leadership development model at other institutions.

Originality/value

The paper shares a successful model for equipping department chairs to be advocates of gender equity, diversity and inclusion in STEM and to be change agents in higher education.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Fei Lanfang

This paper aims to examine how the law may play a role in mediation by paying special attention to how the law is excluded from and included in the process of court…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how the law may play a role in mediation by paying special attention to how the law is excluded from and included in the process of court mediation in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Hundred model court mediation cases selected by the Supreme People’s Court of China were analysed and reviewed.

Findings

The law is relevant in Chinese-style court mediation in four ways: first, judge-mediators are intended to use mediation to avoid resolving legal difficulties or challenges; second, judge-mediators consult the law to anticipate the losing party and the potential negative effects that might result from the adjudication; third, judge-mediators refer to the law to propose a mediation scheme or plan to guide the parties to settle; and fourth, judge-mediators would use the law as a bargaining chip in various ways to induce the parties to settle.

Research limitations/implications

Standards should be set out for the use of law in the mediation process to standardise judge-mediators’ actions, to ensure that the law is not used coercively to push settlement, which would undermine the parties’ self-determination in mediation.

Originality/value

This paper provides an original understanding of how law affects the process, the outcomes and, ultimately, the nature of settlements that parties achieve through court mediation in China. This study contributes to the literature that argues that ethical norms and legal standards should be set to direct those legal evaluations.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Yafei Zhang and Li Chen

The purpose of this study is to explore possible factors leading to a successful mediation in Chinese mediation shows. In China, media always play an indispensable role in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore possible factors leading to a successful mediation in Chinese mediation shows. In China, media always play an indispensable role in information dissemination, morality advocacy and policy explanation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employed content analysis of 166 episodes of one representative mediation show, Gold Medal Mediation, and regression technique in data analysis.

Findings

Results of ordinal regression suggested that “secret talking”, rather than transparency, between disputants had significant influence on successful mediation. Function of mediators is limited in reaching full mediation. The effective factors leading to full mediation include compromise of rights, secret talking, attitude of the observer cohort. It suggests that the role of mediator is limited, rather than being over-exaggerated, in successful mediation. The successful mediation is largely dependent on disputants’ motivations. Additionally, “compromise of rights” by disputants is a key factor in solving disputes.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of this study revealed the role of Chinese mediation shows in propagating mediation in contemporary Chinese society and supporting upheld morality values. Due to the nature of the chosen mediation show, some disputes take more than one episode to solve. However, this study looks at each episode without considering the integrity of the dispute. That is, if the disputes take two episodes, the coder codes the two episodes as two separate disputes instead of looking at it as one dispute.

Originality/value

By exploring various aspects of mediations shows, including the role of mediators, disputants and a cohort of observers, this study can both explicitly show predicted factors to successful mediations on the shows, and can implicitly examine the power and perceived justification of mediation in contemporary China via media.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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