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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2024

Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku, Evans Sokro and Kwasi Dartey-Baah

This study seeks to assess how a humane leadership style affects customer service orientation among casual employees of financial service institutions in Ghana. Using job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to assess how a humane leadership style affects customer service orientation among casual employees of financial service institutions in Ghana. Using job satisfaction as a moderator, this study predicts that a humane leadership style influences casual employees’ customer service orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 328 frontline casual employees of financial service firms. The structural equation modelling technique of partial least squares was used to test the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

The study found that a humane leadership style positively and significantly drives customer service behaviour. Job satisfaction also had a positive effect on customer service orientation among casual employees.

Originality/value

The study appears to be the first of its kind to explore the moderating role of job satisfaction in the connection between humane leadership and customer service orientation from the perspective of casual employees. The study highlights insightful practical implications for corporate managers, HR practitioners and marketing academics.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2024

Evans Sokro, Theresa Obuobisa-Darko and Bernard Okpattah

This study examines learner satisfaction and success as mechanisms through which online learning quality translates into learners’ continuous intentions of use by extending DeLone…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines learner satisfaction and success as mechanisms through which online learning quality translates into learners’ continuous intentions of use by extending DeLone and McLean’s information system success model. It also examines the moderating effect of perceived supervisory support and learners’ self-regulation on online learning quality in Higher Education Institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 540 students in both private and public higher institutions of learning in Ghana. The Partial Least Squares – Structural Equations Modelling (PLS-SEM) technique was used to test the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

The results revealed that system quality emerged as the single most important variable in the DeLone and McLean model, that influences learner success and satisfaction. Further, learner satisfaction has a significant positive effect on learner attitudes, whilst self-regulation was found to moderate the relationship between online learning quality and learner success as well as learner satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study appears to be among the first to explore the inter-relationship among online learning environment quality and learner attitudes and moderating factors perceived supervisory support and self-regulation. The study highlights insightful practical implications for students, faculty and administrators of higher institutions.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

George Kofi Amoako, Kwasi Dartey-Baah and Evans Sokro

The purpose of this paper is to explore how lecturers in both public and private universities in Ghana are motivated to take up teaching as a career using Herzberg’s two-factor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how lecturers in both public and private universities in Ghana are motivated to take up teaching as a career using Herzberg’s two-factor theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, qualitative research design was adopted. Data were collected from 24 lecturers from both public and private universities in Ghana and analysed with NVivo.

Findings

Results from the analysis indicate that public sector university lecturers are generally better motivated than their counterparts at the private sector. Workload is higher at private universities, affecting research and publications negatively. The study also revealed that there are differences in motivation in relation to the hygiene factors between the public and private university teachers.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a few limitations that must be considered and could provide guidance for future study; as this study addressed faculty point of view, future study could investigate from manager’s and other stakeholders’ point of view in order to get a holistic view of the issues under investigation. The sample size could be improved and the study could be conducted in other African countries for the purposes of comparison.

Practical implications

The study shows that many lecturers are not happy in the job for both public and private universities. The findings of the study provide managers in the higher education industry with practical guidelines for strategies to motivate lecturers.

Originality/value

Despite the rapid growth in the educational industry in Ghana, limited studies have been conducted into how lecturers are motivated to stay in teaching. This makes this research unique in Ghana. This study makes an original contribution by comparing how public sector and private sector university lecturers differ in their motivation to teach at the university using Herzberg’s two-factor theory.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2013

George K. Amoako, Ruby Melody Agbola, Robert K. Dzogbenuku and Evans Sokro

Issues concerning society are everybody's business. Therefore, individuals, larger or smaller groups, formal or informal entities, public or private firms, governmental or…

Abstract

Issues concerning society are everybody's business. Therefore, individuals, larger or smaller groups, formal or informal entities, public or private firms, governmental or non-governmental organisations who are key stakeholders of society must always aspire to champion societal concerns. Society's welfare should be everybody's business. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) in a broad sense can be viewed as the relationship of organisations with society as a whole, and the need for organisations to align their values with societal expectations (Atuguba & Dowuona-Hammond, 2006). In reality, it is a set of standards by which organisations can impact their environment with the potential of creating sustainable development (Helg, 2007). It is critical that society educates everyone to be responsible. From all societal actors, universities are the ones educating the future elites of a country. What they teach and do not teach may make or break a nation's future and well-being. As noted by Dashwood and Puplampu (2010), there is a greater need for crafting a sustainable, strategic and mutually beneficial set of responsible actions in embracing the right approaches to CSR. According to them, such actions should emanate from a genuine recognition of, and attention to, economic, traditional, historical, as well as business arguments from the perspectives of the stakeholders and interest groups.

Details

Education and Corporate Social Responsibility International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-590-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2013

Abstract

Details

Education and Corporate Social Responsibility International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-590-6

Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2013

Ruby Melody Agbola is a lecturer at Department of Management Studies, Central Business School, Ghana.

Abstract

Ruby Melody Agbola is a lecturer at Department of Management Studies, Central Business School, Ghana.

Details

Education and Corporate Social Responsibility International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-590-6

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2018

Shweta Kumari and Gordhan K. Saini

The changing demographics of talent market calls for a better understanding of the expectations of diverse job seekers. However, there is limited research on employer…

3869

Abstract

Purpose

The changing demographics of talent market calls for a better understanding of the expectations of diverse job seekers. However, there is limited research on employer attractiveness (EA) factors which cover the expectations of new generation job seekers. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of career growth opportunities (CGO), work–life benefits (WLB) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) reputation on the perceived attractiveness of an organization as an employer and the job pursuit intention (JPI) of job seekers.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (CGO: many vs limited)×2 (WLB: many vs limited)×2 (CSR reputation: high vs low) between-subjects experimental design was used for this study. A total of 240 respondents participated in the study.

Findings

The results showed that provision of CGO had the highest effect on both EA and JPI. This effect was strong enough to compensate for limited WLB and a low CSR reputation. A significant interaction effect between CGO and CSR reputation revealed that the effect of CSR reputation on EA depends on the availability of many or limited CGO.

Originality/value

The study contributes and expands literature on attributes relevant in job choice decisions by providing useful insights regarding how job seekers weigh these attributes while making an employment choice. Also, the study offers suggestions for designing organizations’ recruitment strategy for attracting talent.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

George Kofi Amoako, Joshua Kofi Doe and Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku

This study aims to establish the link between business ethics and brand loyalty and to investigate the mediating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and United Nations…

4218

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish the link between business ethics and brand loyalty and to investigate the mediating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) such as green marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the purposive sampling technique, data were obtained from 622 middle-income city dwellers who shop at leading retail malls. Data were analyzed with partial least square–structural equation model.

Findings

The study found a positive and significant relationship between business ethics, CSR, green marketing and business loyalty. Both CSR and green marketing mediate between perceived firm ethicality and brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This research was done based on general knowledge of business ethics, CSR and green marketing from the consumers’ perspective. Future studies can avoid this limitation.

Practical implications

By ensuring ethical codes, CSR and green marketing, firms can contribute to promoting the SDGs, and at the same time, achieving customer loyalty. Brand loyalty is further enhanced if customers see a firm to be practicing CSR.

Social implications

The SDGs of sustainable production patterns, climate change and its impacts, and sustainably using water resources must become the focus of companies as they ultimately yield loyalty. Policymakers and society can design a policy to facilitate adoption of better ethical behavior and green marketing by firms as a way of promoting SDGs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to test the mediation effect of green marketing and CSR on how ethical behavior leads to brand loyalty. It is also one of the few papers to examine how SDGs can be promoted by businesses as stakeholders.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

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