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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Valentina Iemmi, David Crepaz-Keay, Eva Cyhlarova and Martin Knapp

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a peer-led self-management intervention for people with severe mental disorders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a peer-led self-management intervention for people with severe mental disorders.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a one-arm longitudinal study without control group. In all, 262 adults with (self-reported) severe mental disorders, who have used secondary mental health services and were living in the community were evaluated at three time points (baseline, six and 12 months). Socio-demographic data were collected at baseline. Wellbeing (Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale), functional living skills (Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II) and service use (Client Service Receipt Inventory) data were assessed over time.

Findings

Self-management for people with severe mental disorders improved wellbeing and health-promoting lifestyles. After an increase in the short term, costs appeared to decrease in the longer term, although this change was not statistically significant. Due to the lack of a control group, the authors are unable to attribute those changes to the intervention only. Nevertheless, the self-management intervention appears to warrant further attention on both wellbeing and economic grounds.

Originality/value

Self-management may facilitate recovery, helping to support people with severe mental disorders at no additional cost. Given recent emphasis on recovery, peer workers and self-management, this peer-led self-management approach for people with severe mental disorders appears to have potential.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Eva Cyhlarova, David Crepaz-Keay, Rachel Reeves, Kirsten Morgan, Valentina Iemmi and Martin Knapp

– The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of self-management training as an intervention for people using secondary mental health services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of self-management training as an intervention for people using secondary mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-management and peer support intervention was developed and delivered by secondary mental health service users to 262 people with psychiatric diagnoses living in the community. Data on wellbeing and health-promoting behaviour were collected at three time points (baseline, six, and 12 months).

Findings

Participants reported significant improvements in wellbeing and health-promoting lifestyle six and 12 months after self-management training. Peer-led self-management shows potential to improve long-term health outcomes for people with psychiatric diagnoses.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the lack of a control group, the positive changes cannot definitively be attributed to the intervention. Other limitations were reliance on self-report measures, and the varying numbers of completers at three time points. These issues will be addressed in future studies.

Practical implications

The evaluation demonstrated the effectiveness of self-management training for people with psychiatric diagnoses, suggesting self-management training may bring significant wellbeing gains for this group.

Social implications

This study represents a first step in the implementation of self-management approaches into mental health services. It demonstrates the feasibility of people with psychiatric diagnoses developing and delivering an effective intervention that complements existing services.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the effectiveness of a self-management training programme developed and delivered by mental health service users in the UK.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2010

Dan Robotham, Karen James and Eva Cyhlarova

This study evaluated the implementation of the Choice and Partnership Approach (CAPA), a clinical system designed to improve the management of demand and capacity within child and…

1128

Abstract

This study evaluated the implementation of the Choice and Partnership Approach (CAPA), a clinical system designed to improve the management of demand and capacity within child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). The study aimed to investigate how CAPA had been implemented within CAMHS in England, to explore the experiences of staff working within teams who had implemented the system, and to determine the benefits and challenges of implementing CAPA in practice.The evaluation was conducted in three phases: an initial screening survey was sent out to all CAMHS teams in England; a follow‐up questionnaire was then sent to all teams implementing CAPA; and interviews and focus groups were then conducted with 62 service managers, clinicians and admin staff within six CAMHS teams who had implemented the system. A total of 213 screening questionnaires were completed, and 97 teams were identified as implementing CAPA; 57 of these teams completed follow‐up questionnaires.The results showed that, if well managed and implemented, demand and capacity models such as CAPA appear to provide teams with structured, formal planning mechanisms. However, if implemented poorly and without adequate management, then these models could contribute to confusion and overworking amongst staff. This investigation found the presence of facilitative management to be absolutely crucial for successful implementation of models of demand and capacity.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

David Crepaz‐Keay and Eva Cyhlarova

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and delivery of a self‐management and peer support intervention for people with severe mental health diagnoses.

339

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and delivery of a self‐management and peer support intervention for people with severe mental health diagnoses.

Design/methodology/approach

There was a gap in the provision of a self‐management intervention designed and delivered by people with psychiatric diagnoses. In total, 24 people with the experience of severe mental ill‐health took part in developing the model and course materials for a new self‐management intervention. A three‐stage intervention was designed: two‐day training, six follow‐up sessions, and on‐going peer support.

Findings

Between 2009 and 2012, over six hundred participants across Wales were trained. In total, 35 of the new courses and 27 of the Bipolar UK courses have been delivered. Currently, 15 peer support groups are still meeting regularly and many people are receiving on‐going support. At present, the effectiveness of the intervention is being evaluated; data are being collected at baseline, and at six and 12‐month follow‐up.

Originality/value

Most self‐management strategies developed in the past have been focused on physical health conditions and developed and delivered by clinicians. This new self‐management intervention is based on the needs and experiences of the target beneficiaries. It was developed and is being delivered by people who have a psychiatric diagnosis, and have come through the training themselves.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Thurstine Basset

86

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Thurstine Basset and Peter Ryan

369

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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