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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Eva Cools, Carol Evans and James A. Redmond

The purpose of this paper is to introduce this special issue, which contains selected papers from the 13th Annual European Learning Styles Information Network (ELSIN…

2082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce this special issue, which contains selected papers from the 13th Annual European Learning Styles Information Network (ELSIN) conference held in Ghent, Belgium in June 2008. One of the key aims of ELSIN is to promote understanding of individual learning and cognitive differences through the dissemination of international multidisciplinary research about learning and cognitive styles and strategies of learning and thinking.

Design/methodology/approach

Three papers within this special issue consider how style differences can inform the development of e‐learning opportunities to enhance the learning of all (Vigentini; Kyprianidou, Demetriadis, Pombortsis and Karatasios; Zhu, Valcke and Schellens). The influence of culture on learning is also raised in the paper of Zhu et al. and those of Sulimma and Eaves which both focus more directly on cultural influences on style, learning and teaching.

Findings

A number of key themes permeate the studies included in this special edition such as: the nature of styles; the intrinsic difficulty of isolating style variables from other variables impacting on performance; inherent difficulties in choosing the most appropriate style measures; the potential of e‐learning to attend to individual learning differences; the role of culture in informing attitudes and access to learning; the development of constructivist learning environments to support learning through an understanding of individual differences and most importantly how one can apply such insights about individual differences to inform and enhance instruction.

Originality/value

The papers in this special issue contribute to enhanced knowledge about the value of style differences to design constructive learning environments in multicultural and e‐learning contexts.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Eva Cools and Herman Van Den Broeck

The purpose of this paper is to contribute further insights into how cognitive styles influence managerial behaviour, using a qualitative approach.

3561

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute further insights into how cognitive styles influence managerial behaviour, using a qualitative approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Written testimonies were gathered from people with different cognitive styles, and content analysed (n=100).

Findings

Qualitative evidence was found for managerial style preferences in accordance with cognitive styles, leading to various ways of decision making, conflict handling, and giving feedback.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should explore how these results can be linked to contextual elements and to managerial performance.

Practical implications

This study contributes to increased managerial style awareness, which is important for intrapersonal development and interpersonal cooperation.

Originality/value

This is one of a few studies that have sought to qualitatively grasp the implications of having a particular cognitive style. It provides relevant insights into task‐ and people‐oriented managerial practices beyond previous, mainly quantitative studies.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Maria Kyprianidou, Stavros Demetriadis, Andreas Pombortsis and George Karatasios

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web‐based system person‐centred group‐activity support system (PEGASUS) in…

1173

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web‐based system person‐centred group‐activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person‐centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct objectives: enhancing metacognition (students and teachers are supported to identify their learning and teaching preferences, which in turn is used as a framework for reflection), and group formation (the system suggests homogeneous or heterogeneous workgroups, supporting also teacher‐students negotiations of the final group synthesis).

Design/methodology/approach

First, a theoretical framework is built to reflect the process of transforming the principles for learner‐centred learning into a pedagogical model which becomes the basis for defining the PEGASUS specifications. Then, qualitative field evidence is provided from the initial integration of the system into the teaching process to support students' group activity.

Findings

From the pilot testing of PEGASUS it is evident that learning style‐based group formation might not be acceptable to all students in the typical classroom setting where students already know each other. The early implementation data indicate that not every student might accept the theory‐based grouping suggestions of the instructor.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to qualitative and preliminary results from undergraduate as well as postgraduate students.

Practical implications

Systems like PEGASUS can initiate fruitful discussions among students and teachers on the role of learning styles in learning. However, group activity is a complex socio‐cognitive phenomenon that cannot be approached simply on the basis of students' learning styles. Still, such a system can help identify how students' learning styles can be of significance under certain conditions.

Originality/value

The paper describes the development of a web‐based system for personalised learning and system integration in everyday teaching.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Mina Eaves

The purpose of this paper is to present details of a study investigating learning styles differences of Thai students in England compared to local students in England and…

1437

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present details of a study investigating learning styles differences of Thai students in England compared to local students in England and Thailand. It also discusses key issues in using learning styles in multicultural and international education, given their wide availability online.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods design is used, including a psychometric approach using Vermunt's Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS) with three postgraduate Business student samples – Thai (in England, n=26), European (in England, n=16) and Thai (in Thailand, n=122) and a qualitative approach using focus groups, interviews and open‐ended questionnaires with the Thai (in England, n=43) sample only.

Findings

One‐way independent analysis of variance analyses on ILS scores show that learning styles differ significantly between the three samples on each of the test occasions, particularly in meaning‐directed learning and undirected learning. The qualitative data analysis shows that Thai students in England perceive culturally‐determined differences in teaching and learning behaviour between Thai and English higher education environments that can cause difficulties for them.

Research limitations/implications

The use of mixed methods gives data of greater breadth and depth than a single method; however, the sample sizes are somewhat limited.

Practical implications

Thai students in England require additional support from educators and educational institutions.

Originality/value

This paper provides a valuable insight into the learning styles and needs of Thai students in England, given the paucity of research in this area.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Lorenzo Vigentini

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance of three different types of styles measure for students' learning in a large introductory university course in…

1225

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance of three different types of styles measure for students' learning in a large introductory university course in psychology, using information technology to enhance teaching. The paper examines the relationship between styles, the usage of learning technology, and academic performance in this course.

Design/methodology/approach

Styles are measured using approaches to learning, thinking styles, and cognitive styles. The usage of the online material is measured by considering both time spent on the resources and the amount of material viewed (pages and hits) as well as tools used.

Findings

The findings are that the academic performance of students who used the online resources is significantly higher than those who either choose to not use the online materials at all or choose to use to the materials to a lesser extent. It is determined that the measure of approaches to learning (approaches and study skills inventory for students) is the stronger predictor for successful use of the material.

Research limitations/implications

Using a reasonably sized sample in an ecologically valid context offered the opportunity to put styles into context and to consider the practical use of styles. This research is limited by the context and the particular sample. It is also difficult to completely exclude the fact that students using the extra material are generally more motivated and would have obtained better grades even without the resources.

Originality/value

This paper offers further evidence for the relations between different measures of styles and evaluates the effects that styles might have on usage of online material and academic performance.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Maren Sulimma

Epistemological beliefs, defined as individuals' beliefs about the nature of knowledge and the process of knowing, are assumed to serve an important function in regulating…

1163

Abstract

Purpose

Epistemological beliefs, defined as individuals' beliefs about the nature of knowledge and the process of knowing, are assumed to serve an important function in regulating the application of individuals' learning behaviour. Previous research has mainly been shaped by the framework of results of white, well‐educated people from North America. More empirical work is needed to examine epistemological beliefs in a cross‐cultural context. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibility of using cultural classifications to indicate the development of epistemological beliefs in different countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐cultural pilot‐study is carried out in Germany and Australia with a total of 103 participants. A German and English version of the Schraw et al.'s epistemic beliefs inventory, based on Schommer's model, is employed for the study. The cultural comparison between Germany and Australia is carried out by using Hofstede and Hofstede's cultural classification.

Findings

The cultural comparison between both countries leads to the hypothesis that the development of the epistemological beliefs is different. Although factor analysis indicates the same three dimensions of epistemological beliefs for both countries (structure, source, and control), the development for each dimension is different.

Practical implications

It might be possible to indicate epistemological beliefs in various countries due to cultural classification.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new perspective of epistemological beliefs within cross‐cultural research and might lay the path for cross‐field research projects.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Chang Zhu, Martin Valcke and Tammy Schellens

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is a cultural gap in student perceptions of online collaborative learning and to investigate to what extent student…

1718

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is a cultural gap in student perceptions of online collaborative learning and to investigate to what extent student perceptions, motivation, and learning strategies change over time due to the actual involvement in a collaborative e‐learning environment (ELE).

Design/methodology/approach

A parallel e‐learning environment for a first‐year university course is implemented for a Flemish group (n = 217) at Ghent University and a Chinese group (n = 165) at Beijing Normal University. Student perceptions of the online collaborative learning environment and their motivation and learning strategies before and after the ELE are measured.

Findings

The findings show that the Flemish group perceive the online collaborative learning environment more positively compared to the Chinese group. However, Chinese students' motivation, and learning strategies change significantly towards a way that is more in line with a social‐constructivist learning approach after the online collaborative learning experience.

Practical implications

The current results indicate that students from different cultural contexts perceive online collaborative learning environments differently. Specific cultural adaptations in e‐learning design could be considered when an ELE is to be implemented cross‐culturally.

Originality/value

This study can help both Chinese and Western instructors to become aware of different perceptions of online collaborative learning and to be more supportive to the students.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1935

B. Lockspeiser

FLYING, in common with all means of transport, is affected by adverse weather conditions, but the necessity of aeroplanes maintaining flying speed introduces a major…

Abstract

FLYING, in common with all means of transport, is affected by adverse weather conditions, but the necessity of aeroplanes maintaining flying speed introduces a major difficulty of its own. The older forms of transport are able, in the last resort, to evade their difficulties by coming to a dead stop. An aeroplane must, literally, fly in the face of its difficulties. It must fly blind in clouds and perhaps land in fog. Over and above this, flight under certain meteorological conditions introduces a danger unique to aircraft. Ice may deposit at all leading edges and grow to windward, at critical regions of the relative airflow, in shapes which increase drag and seriously decrease lift. The accumulated ice adds to the weight. Unsymmetrical ice deposits on the airscrew blades cause dangerous engine vibrations which can only be kept in check, if at all, by throttling back at the expense of thrust. Venturis and pressure head orifices become blocked with ice, rendering the instruments they serve useless. External controls may become jammed. In short, many adverse factors to prevent flight may be brought into play simultaneously by the mere fact that particular meteorological conditions have been encountered.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 7 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Bennett J. Price

This article discusses the basics of computer‐room air conditioning, an important component of the special environment required by mainframe computers and many…

Abstract

This article discusses the basics of computer‐room air conditioning, an important component of the special environment required by mainframe computers and many mini‐computers as well. Computer room air conditioners differ in some significant ways from “comfort” air‐conditioners, which are designed for the comfort of people rather than machines. These differences make it less than ideal to use air conditioning systems designed for human comfort for computer cooling. The author describes several different types of air‐conditioners, considerations related to the construction of a computer room, and factors that determine air‐conditioning requirements.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Kenneth M. Eades, Martson Gould and Jennifer Hill

The student's task is to develop a comprehensive strategy for Briggs & Stratton, which is facing severe competition and margin pressures. A major component of the strategy…

Abstract

The student's task is to develop a comprehensive strategy for Briggs & Stratton, which is facing severe competition and margin pressures. A major component of the strategy to be considered is whether to implement economic value added (EVA) as a new performance measurement for management. The case is designed to serve as an introduction to how to compute and use EVA. It emphasizes the importance of performance evaluation as part of a larger strategic plan. A teaching note is available to registered faculty, as well as two video supplements to enhance student learning.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

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