Search results

1 – 10 of 148
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2017

Dragan Momirović, Marko Janković and Maja Ranđelović

The economic and financial crisis, especially the sovereign debt crisis, discovered many deficiencies and weaknesses in the banking sector in the European Union (EU). The…

Abstract

The economic and financial crisis, especially the sovereign debt crisis, discovered many deficiencies and weaknesses in the banking sector in the European Union (EU). The need for special surveillance and supervision of cross-border banking cooperation and termination of the toxic link between sovereign debt and banking sector have accelerated the process of forming and establishing a Banking Union (BU). An integrated financial framework has been established in which the European Central Bank (ECB) through the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM) has a key role and the responsibility for the overall supervision of the banking sector of the euro zone. The Single Resolution Mechanism (SRM) and schemes of the Single Deposit Guarantee Mechanism (SDGM) are under the national supervisory authorities while the European Banking Authority (EBA) is responsible for developing the Single Rules. From the new architecture is expected the preservation of the single market and a common currency, breaking “toxic connections” between sovereign debt and banks, mitigation and removal of financial instability and economic growth. The research shows that the BU together with the ECB in a certain sense, also contributes to the normalization of credit and financial conditions in the single mark. Estimates through SSM, conducted by the ECB and the EBA, during, 2014 and 2015 on 107 banks in 21 countries indicate progress toward solvency and resilience of the banking system of the euro area. Despite some initial success the entire project BU seems to have missed on opportunities, resulted in late reactions, and was too complex to be feasible. The political will of national governments to give up sovereignty over its banking sector and transfer competencies to the supranational institutions is a key factor in the success or failure of a BU. It seems so but past experience indicates that there is no political willingness to solve problems. Mainly most of the government avoids cleaning a hidden “skeleton in closets” due to lack of means for recapitalization while some are trying for loans from the ECB to help their banks. The ECB plays a key oversight role at the EU level and has too much power, which can cause risks caused by conflicting goals. The ECB is losing the role of the final refuge of liquidity, which is the main disadvantage of a BU. The SSM is susceptible to criticism due to difficulty in operation because of slow incorporation of European legislation into national law. Slow implementation carries risks of fragmentation of the market, regardless of the responsibility of the ECB. The financial capacity of the temporary agreement with the SRM is insufficient in solving the crisis of more banks while procedural application is complex and time-consuming. Planned backstop with a centralized resource is a resolution that is insufficient for solving the failure of big systemic banks, which are too big to bail. The heterogeneity of the existing Deposit Guarantee Schemes (DGS) and the banking systems of the member states of the euro zone caused controversy in terms of setting of common insurance schemes. The procedures for the recovery and resolution of critical banks are problematic.

Details

Economic Imbalances and Institutional Changes to the Euro and the European Union
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-510-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Expert briefing
Publication date: 11 May 2017

European Banking Authority post-Brexit

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Katica Tomic

Product intervention power is introduced under the markets in financial instruments regulation (MiFIR) and packaged retail and insurance-based investment products (PRIIPs…

Abstract

Product intervention power is introduced under the markets in financial instruments regulation (MiFIR) and packaged retail and insurance-based investment products (PRIIPs) Regulation for all EU Member States and gives National Competent Authorities (NCAs), European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA), and European Banking Authority (EBA) powers to monitor financial products (and services) under their supervision and to “temporarily” prohibit or restrict the marketing, distribution, or sale of certain financial instruments, or to intervene in relation to certain financial activities or practice. This extends the supervisory measures defined in MiFID II to any PRIIPs (including insurance-based investment products “IBI products”) that would not otherwise fall under the scope of MiFID II. Product intervention power is given to the NCAs, and in order to use power, it requires to take the specifics of the individual case into account and a series of conditions, criteria, and factors to fulfill. Moreover, ESMA and the EBA have a type of control function and ability to override national regulators on product. The aim of product intervention powers is to ensure strengthening of investor protection, but given the potential significant impact of this power, calls into question of possibility to delay innovation and slow down product developments on the capital market.

This paper provided an overview of supervisory measures on product intervention, that is, scope of the product intervention power, criteria, factors, and risks which have to be taken into consideration when using this regulator’s tool.

Details

Governance and Regulations’ Contemporary Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-815-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 February 2016

Sharon Marya Cilia Tortell

The purpose of this chapter is to determine the future trends in the retail payment market in Malta, and the manner in which the major stakeholders are set to respond to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to determine the future trends in the retail payment market in Malta, and the manner in which the major stakeholders are set to respond to the potential that innovative technology within this area is unlocking. Stakeholders strive to keep abreast with developments within this ambit, in pursuit of implementing a proactive approach within their respective roles.

Methodology/approach

The objective of this study is achieved through a series of semi-structured interviews with the major stakeholders in the local retail payment market, mainly Financial Services Regulators, Supervisors and overseers as well as the Maltese Financial Services licence holders.

Findings

The evolution in the retail payment landscape witnessed in recent years exposes immeasurable challenges to Malta’s financial services sector and the economy at large. The conclusions derived from this research dovetail with the thorough literature review conducted, in exploring the manner in which such trends are envisaged to unfold within this sector. This study explores the legislative framework and regulatory regime, both current and proposed, which lay the foundations for the interplay between the respective stakeholders.

Originality/value

This study reveals the approach taken by the various stakeholders, as they each respond to such developments in the retail payment sphere. These are predominately driven by market forces endowed with a mix of opportunities, as each stakeholder strives to remain resilient towards future industry challenges. This research is conducive towards enhancing the much needed clarity and awareness in the local retail payment market, and promotes the use of innovative, secure and cost-efficient retail payment methods.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Bank Financial Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-000-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Lukas Prorokowski

To explain the shadow banking regime that will be enforced in the European Union by local regulators starting in January 2017.

Downloads
1231

Abstract

Purpose

To explain the shadow banking regime that will be enforced in the European Union by local regulators starting in January 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

Recognising the regulatory-induced difficulties in the process of identifying certain types of clients (investment funds) as shadow banking entities, this article provides a decision tree for the shadow banking classification process in order to aid the impacted institutions with the assessment of their clients. With this in mind, the article advises the impacted institutions on the specific steps that should be taken when assessing investment funds for shadow banking flags. Furthermore, the article provides insights into the information required to conduct the shadow banking classification process.

Findings

The regime requires the impacted institutions to assess their clients for shadow banking flags in order to impose limits on credit lines to clients classified as shadow banking entities. The US regulatory jurisdiction will be impacted over a longer term.

Originality/value

The recommendations in this article will be especially useful for investment funds to ensure that the relevant information is clearly stated in their prospectuses in order to avoid being classified as shadow banking entities.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Paola Musile Tanzi, Elena Aruanno and Mattia Suardi

Business Model Analysis is acquiring increasing visibility in the European banking regulatory framework, following the European Banking Authority guidelines on common…

Abstract

Purpose

Business Model Analysis is acquiring increasing visibility in the European banking regulatory framework, following the European Banking Authority guidelines on common procedures and methodologies for the supervisory review and evaluation process (SREP), developed to assess business and strategic risks (EBA, 2014, 2015a, 2015b, 2015c). Starting from a selected literature review, in the paper, the authors analyse business models set up by financial intermediaries, bank and non-banks, for the distribution of investment services, first by comparing European niche players with European banking global players, and second, comparing European niche players among themselves to understand the evolution of business models for the distribution of investment services at European level. The research is supported by the Baffi–Carefin Research Centre at the Bocconi University (Italy), in collaboration with ANASF, the Italian Association of Financial Advisors (Italy).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider a sample of European financial players from 2009 to 2014. The authors’ focus is on France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain and the UK; overall the authors’ handmade data set is based on 162 annual reports. The authors follow two main questions: Do the niche players, as they are focused on the distribution of investment services, have an upper limit to profitability, compared to the global players, as risk-takers in many financial areas? How is the business model of niche players changing, facing increasing competition and regulatory pressures?

Findings

Answering the first research question, the highest net profitability is found in the niche players group; the global players, as risk-takers, achieve lower remuneration, in contrast with the risk premium theory. The results were assessed over a limited period, however, deemed in line with the company’s strategic planning horizon. Answering the second research question, the authors focus on the case of niche players, using a cluster analysis. The authors identify three different business models: most dynamic niche players, which combine investment services, insurance and welfare services, achieving the highest margins and stability; players mainly focused on asset management, whose key vulnerability is the degree of open architecture, especially in light of future MiFID 2 implementation; and players mainly focused on the creation of well-structured on-line platforms, which offer also brokerage services, thereby reducing their marginality and potentially increasing their business risk.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the limited time series, the authors’ research gives some inputs for those interested in deepening the business model analysis focus on the distribution of investment services and the business and strategic risk assessment, both for the global banks and the niche players (banks and non-banks).

Practical implications

The authors’ results could be of some interest during the strategic assessment of global banks and niche players, both adopting an internal perspective or an external one, as regulator.

Social implications

By giving some specific insights into the assessment and comparison of business and strategic risks among global and niche players, the authors’ research provides the basis for further research in the field of the distribution of investment services.

Originality/value

The originality mainly regards the business model risk perspective and the focus of the authors’ analysis: the distribution of investment services. This sector, unlike the asset management, does not have an easily recognisable group of comparables at European level, all the European countries analysed have very different business models. This research avails of an original database, that is unique to Europe.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Jakob Schemmel

This paper aims to demonstrate how the European regulatory structure of the financial markets has changed after the financial crisis. Drawing from these findings, it…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how the European regulatory structure of the financial markets has changed after the financial crisis. Drawing from these findings, it discusses how the regulatory system might change and be adapted to a post-Brexit financial market.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a systematic/legal approach. First, it analyses the recent reform against the background of European law and corresponding research. In a second step, it discusses the implications of Brexit by examining policy and legal contributions.

Findings

The changes to the European regulatory and supervisory structure of the financial markets have proven to be a pacemaker for European administrative and treaty law. Long-standing principles have fundamentally changed. Brexit, on the other hand, even though equally severe might not lead to similar results.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a limited reform to the existing regulatory structure to consolidate developments, ease constitutional frictions and enable the regulatory authorities to react quickly to volatile markets via rule making.

Originality/value

The paper draws attention to an almost unnoticed development in European law. It also illustrates the effects of Brexit on the European financial markets.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Moustapha Daouda Dala

This paper aims to investigate how stockholders and bondholders react to the information disclosed on the financial markets during crisis periods. This paper considers the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how stockholders and bondholders react to the information disclosed on the financial markets during crisis periods. This paper considers the 2011 European Banking Authority’s stress test as it disclosed detailed information about banks.

Design/methodology/approach

It was conducted during the European sovereign debt crisis, and this paper uses an event study methodology. This paper analyzes the average cumulative abnormal returns for different subsamples of banks. This paper compares the reactions of stockholders and bondholders to the stress test by considering pre-results announcements (signal generating process) to the publication of the results on the disclosure date, using quantitative data for each individual bank that participated in the stress test (the signal provided to the financial market).

Findings

This paper finds that stockholders’ reaction is more sensitive to idiosyncratic components of the disclosed information, whereas bondholders are more influenced by systematic risk. A deeper investigation shows that subordinated bondholders tend to behave quite similarly to stockholders. This specific reaction of stockholders during financial distress may make them more likely than bondholders to impose market discipline during troubled periods.

Originality/value

This paper brings several new insights to the behavior of stock and bond holders during times of financial distress and makes recommendations to regulators that may serve to refine communication to markets to reduce the shock of negative news.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2016

Abstract

Details

The Theory and Practice of Directors’ Remuneration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-683-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Luisa De Vita and Antonella Magliocco

The purpose of this paper is to provide a first impact assessment of the Italian quota law in order to explore whether “gender equality by law” contributes to redefining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a first impact assessment of the Italian quota law in order to explore whether “gender equality by law” contributes to redefining, albeit in part, consolidating and establishing positions of power and decision making. The paper analyses these dynamics by focusing on a specific economic sector, the banking sector. The analysis strives to determine: whether binding quotas are giving rise to an apparent enforcement by building up new distortionary equilibria (such as new forms of horizontal segregation); what extent the financial crisis has impacted on the rhetoric of female representation, and whether it has pushed towards a “regenerative” organizational change aimed at achieving a more inclusive and egalitarian image.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is organized as follows. Section 2 reviews the theoretical and empirical debate on gender diversity and quota impact. Section 3 reports macro and micro data on the italian system; Section 4 describes the Italian banking system and gives a first impact assessment on Italian banks of the mandatory gender quotas in Italy (the so-called “Golfo-Mosca law,” named after MPs who proposed the law); some qualitative considerations are carried out on the reactions of Italian banks to the financial crisis in terms of “bridge policies” aimed at corresponding to a higher demand of customer satisfaction and fairness. Section 5 concludes and summarizes the finding of the study.

Findings

The Italian banking system is not so dramatically ranked among the EU countries as in the recent past. The gender rebalance in management bodies could be considered rather satisfying. If we compare ten-year-old findings, the number of women on board of directors has tripled. But data clearly show a dichotomy due to significant differences between listed and non-listed banks. In non-listed banks, women are still relegated to an under-represented position, reaching only 13 percent on boards of directors (as against 33 percent in listed banks). The data confirm the results found in non-financial sector that women are significantly better represented on audit boards. In accordance with all previous studies, no relevant changes can be noticed on key-decision roles: no CEOs or Directors general are women in listed banks, and women are always more represented in non-executive functions.

Originality/value

The paper analyses the law experience in Italy as a significant case study by proving that rules such as temporary binding gender quotas (introduced by law in 2011) can be useful, but not always enough to remove blocking or distortive factors in organizational ladders.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 38 no. 7-8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 148