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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Eunju Suh, Matt Alhaery, Brett Abarbanel and Andrew McKenna

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine Millennials and generational differences in online gambling activity by comparing online gambling behavior across four different generations: Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Millennials.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised tracked gambling data at the individual player level provided by an online casino accepting real money wagers in a major US gambling market. Attributes of gambling behavior were examined and compared across different generations using Kruskal–Wallis test and pairwise comparisons.

Findings

Generational differences were observed in 13 of the 16 behavioral variables. Millennials spent the least amount of time on gambling and exhibited the lowest scores on the number of days for slot gambling, trip length and trip frequency among all generations. However, their average table gaming volume per play day was greater than those of other generations.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide a better understanding of the generational differences in online gambling behavior. They also help casino operators and gaming machine manufacturers develop casino games and products that can appeal to different generational groups in the online gambling market.

Originality/value

Despite the on-going industry discussion about Millennials and their potential influence on the online gambling market, there appears to be a paucity of empirical research on the online gambling behavior of the Millennial generation. This study fills that gap in empirical evidence, addressing generational differences in online gambling.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Eunju Suh and Mahdi Alhaery

While United States is among countries with the world’s highest coronavirus infections, its approaches and policies to reopen the economy vary by state. A lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

While United States is among countries with the world’s highest coronavirus infections, its approaches and policies to reopen the economy vary by state. A lack of objective criteria and monitoring toward satisfying the criteria can lead to another COVID-19 outbreak and business closures. Considering the pressing need to return to normalcy without a rebound of COVID-19 infections and deaths, an index that provides a data-driven and objective insight is urgently needed. Hence, a method was devised to assess the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and determine the degree of progress any state has made in containing the spread of COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

Using measures such as the weekly averages of daily new deaths, ICU bed occupancy rates, positive cases and test positivity rates, two indexes were developed: COVID-19 reopening readiness and severity.

Findings

A clear difference in the pandemic severity trends can be observed between states, which is possibly due to the disparity in the state’s response to coronavirus. A sharp upward trend in index values requires caution prior to moving to the next phase of reopening.

Originality/value

The composite indexes advanced in this study will provide a universal, standardized and unbiased view of each state’s readiness to reopen and allow comparisons between states. This in turn can help governments and health-care agencies take counter measures if needed as to the anticipated demand for future health-care services and minimize adverse consequences of opening.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Woojin Lee, HeeKyung Sung, Eunju Suh and Jinlin Zhao

The purpose of this study was first to examine how goal-oriented attendees and experiential-oriented attendees were related with their overall satisfaction and loyalty of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was first to examine how goal-oriented attendees and experiential-oriented attendees were related with their overall satisfaction and loyalty of the destination with respect to international food and wine festival. It also investigated how these relations are mediated by different dimension of experiential consumption values such as consumer return on investment (CROI, active value), escapism (active value) and service excellence (reactive value) and aesthetics (reactive value).

Design/methodology/approach

Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to and collected from attendees at the 2011 Food Network South Beach Wine and Food Festival in Miami, Florida. A total of 450 subjects were collected from attendees indicating a response rate of about 88 per cent. Total 13 hypotheses were tested using structural equation model (SEM) with AMOS, and the results were interpreted adapting Mathwick’s (2001) typology of experiential value.

Findings

The findings indicate that goal-oriented attendees had stronger relationship with reactive experiential values such as service excellence and aesthetics than active values, whereas experiential-oriented attendees had more significant relations with active experiential values such as CROI and escapism than reactive values. In addition, CROI, escapism and service excellence were found to have a positive influence on the overall satisfaction with the festival; in turn, the attendees’ satisfaction had a positive effect on their intention to revisit the destination. Further, the results demonstrated that all experiential values, including CROI and escapism (active values), and service excellence and aesthetics (reactive values), played a mediating role between goal-oriented/experientially oriented attendee and satisfaction with the festival.

Practical implications

The festival organizers and managers should understand what drives the attendees’ participation in the festival. Implementing experiential marketing through various dimensions of experiential value can attract more potential attendees, provide unique experiences and create favorable perception toward the destination.

Originality/value

The research is original in terms of conceptualizing and empirically testing the relation between experiential consumption values and behavior loyalty within the special events and festivals with a specific focus on international food and wine festival. A finding of particular importance here is verifying the unique characteristics of goal-/experiential-oriented attendees in festival settings and determining the linkages between these different attendees and active/reactive experiential values, not to mention the relation with the overall satisfaction and loyalty to the festival destination.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Eunju Suh and Matt Alhaery

This paper aims to, considering the potential to generate additional revenue from cross-gamers, identify variables predicting predominant slot-players’ propensity to play…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to, considering the potential to generate additional revenue from cross-gamers, identify variables predicting predominant slot-players’ propensity to play table games, as well as predominant table-game players’ propensity to play slots (cross-game play). Casino marketers often promote cross-game play through game lessons and coupons for game trial.

Design/methodology/approach

Logistic regression analysis was performed on the player data provided by a destination hotel casino on the Las Vegas Strip. Furthermore, the authors described how to estimate propensity scores, the probability of cross-game play, at the individual level, using a logistic regression equation.

Findings

Comparisons of cross-gamers versus non cross-gamers indicated that the amount of play and gaming values of cross-gamers were much higher than those of slot-only players. The results of a logistic regression analysis show that a player’s cross-gaming propensity can be predicted using gaming-related behavioral data. More specifically, cross-gaming propensities were associated with the frequency and recency of casino trips, the amount of money won or lost in gaming, player values to the casino, the duration of play and the length of a customer–casino relationship.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended that future research apply the model tested herein to other samples and investigate other predictor variables to develop a better predictive model for cross-game play.

Practical implications

The findings and the model introduced herein could help casino marketers identify players with cross-gaming propensity and develop more targeted strategies for customer-relationship management and database marketing.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to estimate the cross-gaming propensity at the individual level and offers detailed guidance on how to use the propensity scores for targeting specific customers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Sarah Tanford and Eunju Suh

Casinos offer a variety of dining experiences to appeal to the tastes of different customers. The aim of this paper is to investigate the indirect impact of dining by…

Abstract

Purpose

Casinos offer a variety of dining experiences to appeal to the tastes of different customers. The aim of this paper is to investigate the indirect impact of dining by restaurant type on gaming by worth segment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from two hotel‐casinos were analyzed using time series regression analysis. Variables representing restaurant covers at steakhouse, buffet and casual dining venues were used to predict slot coin‐in for five customer worth segments.

Findings

Steakhouse dining was a significant predictor of slot coin‐in for high worth players, buffet and casual dining were related to low‐worth gaming volume, whereas medium‐worth players were impacted by a range of dining options.

Research limitations/implications

Regression analysis does not imply causality, and the results may not hold for other casino properties or sample time periods.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the optimal restaurant mix at casinos and the types of offers that are given to different customer worth segments. This study also helps casino operators evaluate the profitability of each type of restaurant they operate.

Originality/value

The research fills a gap in the casino literature by segmenting customers using the same metric as casino operators, namely gaming worth. It provides new insight into indirect dining‐gaming relationships by investigating different restaurant types.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Fevzi Okumus

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Fevzi Okumus

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Content available

Abstract

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2007

Eunju Ko and Heewon Sung

“Trading up” is the phenomenon that describes consumers’ willingness to pay premiums on goods that are emotionally meaningful to them. The meaning of a good is reliant on…

Abstract

“Trading up” is the phenomenon that describes consumers’ willingness to pay premiums on goods that are emotionally meaningful to them. The meaning of a good is reliant on an individual's consumption values. The purpose of this study was to examine the phenomenon of trading up among Korean university students. A total of 223 usable surveys were analyzed. Fifty-one product categories were reported for trading up, and divided into four classifications: clothes, fashion accessories, small electronics, and other appliances. These four classifications were significantly associated with brand types, retailing formats, and information sources. Finally, respondents were classified into three groups according to consumption values and each group exhibited different relationships with the marketing mix variables.

Details

Cross-Cultural Buyer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-485-0

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Hyeli (Lina) Kim, Eunju Woo, Muzaffer Uysal and Nakyung Kwon

The purpose of this study is to examine hotel industry employees’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the influence of these perceptions on their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine hotel industry employees’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the influence of these perceptions on their quality of working life (QWL), job satisfaction and overall quality of life. By applying need satisfaction theory and bottom–up spillover theory, the study hypothesizes that employees’ overall quality of life is affected by QWL and job satisfaction. CSR serves as an antecedent to the hypothesis.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population for this study consisted of hotel industry employees working for companies in which CSR practices are conducted. The data collection method involved distributing a survey questionnaire. Using a sample drawn from employees in upscale hotels in South Korea, 442 usable responses were analyzed using a SEM approach.

Findings

The results revealed that philanthropic and economic CSR positively affected QWL, while legal and ethical CSR did not affect QWL. The study also confirms the need satisfaction theory, which suggests that employees’ QWL and job satisfaction affect their overall quality of life.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of CSR perception, most of the previous studies in this area have examined company and customer perspectives, while only limited research has examined employees’ CSR perceptions. The results of this research enrich knowledge of the outcome of CSR from the employee perspective. Information about employees’ perceptions of CSR activities is valuable for hotel management as it is the employees who turn CSR statements to actions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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