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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Opeolu M. Ogundele, Sefia T. Muazu, Ajibola B. Oyedeji, Eugénie Kayitesi, Patrick B. Njobeh and Samson A. Oyeyinka

Cassava is a starchy crop with several industrial applications, but it deteriorates very fast after harvest. Refrigeration has been used to extend the storage life of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Cassava is a starchy crop with several industrial applications, but it deteriorates very fast after harvest. Refrigeration has been used to extend the storage life of the root and the starch isolated from the stored roots characterized. Hence, the purpose of this research is to investigate the chemical, functional, pasting and sensory properties of custard prepared from starch isolated from refrigerated cassava root.

Design/methodology/approach

Freshly harvest cassava root were cleaned and stored in a refrigerator operating at 4 °C for a period of one, two and three weeks. Starch was extracted from the fresh and stored roots using established method and custard prepared from each of the starch sample. The custard sample was analysed for amylose content, functional, pasting and sensory properties.

Findings

Amylose content in the pastes varied significantly from 18.45 to 25.45%. Refrigeration showed a significant impact on the swelling power of the custard, which could be linked to variation in amylose content. Colour and textural properties of the custard were similar across the samples suggesting a minimal impact of refrigeration on the isolated starch. Refrigerated cassava roots can produce acceptable custard with minimal changes in sensory properties if the storage period is closely monitored.

Originality/value

In a previous study, the authors have shown that starch and cooked paste may be made from stored cassava roots without substantial changes in the quality of these products. This study further confirms the possibility of using starch from the stored roots in food applications such as in custard formulation. No report has documented the properties of custard from starch obtained from refrigerated cassava root.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Makumba Chewe Temba, Patrick Njobeh, Derek Ndinteh and Eugenie Kayitesi

The purpose of this study was to composite maize, a cereal grain with low protein and lysine content, with groundnut a rich source of protein, to improve the nutritional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to composite maize, a cereal grain with low protein and lysine content, with groundnut a rich source of protein, to improve the nutritional quality of maize–groundnut composite flours and their resultant porridges.

Design/methodology/approach

Defatted and full fat groundnut flours were used to prepare maize–groundnut composite flours and porridges at the ratio of 100:0, 55:45, 70:30 and 85:15, respectively. They were analyzed for proximate composition, energy value, amino acid and fatty acid profiles.

Findings

Compositing maize with groundnut significantly (p ≤ 0.05) increased proteins from 10 per cent in maize flour to up to 21 per cent in composite porridge (denoted DFC1). The energy values for composite porridges were 434 Kcal/100 g when compared with 398 Kcal/100 g established for maize porridge alone. Lysine content was three times higher in composite flours than for maize flour, while for composite porridges, lysine was four times higher than in maize porridge. There was an increase of 35 per cent in oleic acid content when maize flour was composited with groundnut flour.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required to evaluate the properties of full fat and defatted maize–groundnut porridges and their effects on consumer acceptability.

Originality/value

It can be concluded that compositing maize with full fat and defatted groundnut has the capability of improving the nutritional quality of cereal-based diets consequently contributing to a significant increase in nutritional security of African populations and those of other developing countries of the world.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Nombulelo Zulu, Eugenie Kayitesi and Opeolu M. Ogundele

The effect of the addition of red palm olein (RPO) as a natural antioxidant to sunflower (SF) on chemical properties and deep-frying oxidative stability of resultant oil…

Abstract

Purpose

The effect of the addition of red palm olein (RPO) as a natural antioxidant to sunflower (SF) on chemical properties and deep-frying oxidative stability of resultant oil during storage.

Design/methodology/approach

RPO was added to SF at different levels 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 50, 75 and 100 (w/w), and potato chips were fried in oil blends repeatedly at 180 °C for 2.5 min for five days to evaluate the effect on chemical properties and oxidative stability.

Findings

The results revealed that linoleic acid and total polar compound (TPC) contents decreased in all RPO and SF resultant oil after five days of storage. Colour significantly (p = 0.05) decreased, while peroxide and iodine values were significantly lowered during storage. The oxidative stability increased significantly in the resultant oil. However, an increase in free fatty acid (FFA) before frying significantly reduced with repeated frying of resultant oil during storage. RPO (5–75%) therefore retards oxidative rancidity in the resultant oil after repeated deep frying and storage.

Originality/value

SF oil is high in polyunsaturated fatty acids but prone to oxidation upon heating and storage. RPO is an important ingredient used in industrial frying rich in phytonutrients and a better replacement to synthetic antioxidants. This study indicated that supplementing SF oil with RPO may be recommended to improve the oxidative stability of oils during frying.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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