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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Eugene H. Fram and Andrew J. DuBrin

This article describes an empirical investigation of a relatively new marketing concept, the Time Guarantee, as implemented by an automobile dealership. Results suggested…

Abstract

This article describes an empirical investigation of a relatively new marketing concept, the Time Guarantee, as implemented by an automobile dealership. Results suggested: • Consumers regarded the Time Guarantee as a feature that could prompt them to differentiate sellers. • Consumers in a variety of demographic categories placed a high value on time. • Consumers viewed the Time Guarantee as a benefit which should be included in the price paid for the product.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Eugene H. Fram and Martin L. Presberg

Reports on an exploratory study (mail survey) of industrialsupplier satisfaction with the purchasing partnership format and howthese agreements can relate to current…

Abstract

Reports on an exploratory study (mail survey) of industrial supplier satisfaction with the purchasing partnership format and how these agreements can relate to current market conditions. The respondent sales managers had very positive attitudes toward, and expectations from, purchasing partnerships. For some, these partnerships appear to be the only way to compete in an unstable market. It appears that the responsibility for keeping the arrangement mutually profitable is that of the supplier. It also seems that top managers will have to be more involved with these accounts because of the large sales volumes generated by each. The suppliers reported a need for a better flow of information from buyers which can be facilitated by a purchasing partnership. The major partnership challenges for suppliers are to maintain fair profit margins for themselves and to build buyer loyalty so that competitors cannot interrupt the relationship.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Eugene H. Fram and Andrew Callahan

Given the growing and widespread use of consumer penalties, there is little doubt business considers them an effective way to get customers to follow through on…

1061

Abstract

Given the growing and widespread use of consumer penalties, there is little doubt business considers them an effective way to get customers to follow through on commitments. Yet no one really knows how people, as individuals, respond when they are penalized by banks, airlines, cell phone companies or other vendors. What types of behavioral reactions do penalties elicit from consumers? What is the impact on the businesses that charged them? The authors turn a spotlight on these previously unexamined issues by analyzing the reactions of 44 randomly selected consumers who faced 66 different consumer penalties. Key findings, from a pilot analysis, include the fact that in 38 of the 66 penalty cases examined, study participants thought that the penalties that they incurred were both unfair charges and the amounts unjustified. Overall, a third of all penalties resulted in customers changing vendors. Additional findings show word‐of‐mouth communication to others was significant, and that over half of penalized consumers challenged their penalties, with 50 percent of them having some success. Study results strongly indicate companies should be taking a closer look at their penalty policies in light of building long‐term customer relationships.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Eugene H. Fram

Highlights the importance of selecting the correct internationaldistributors if a firm wishes to trade effectively in the wider market.Describes a study commissioned…

Abstract

Highlights the importance of selecting the correct international distributors if a firm wishes to trade effectively in the wider market. Describes a study commissioned exploring the steps required to minimize the risk when selecting a distributor, e.g. use of end‐user references and suggestions. Concludes that firms need to develop an effective procedure for selecting distributors, utilizing management attention and objectivity to decide on the key factors involved.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Eugene H. Fram

Marketing Myopia—misperceiving markets—is a well‐known marketing management problem, and most marketing executives are alert to it. However, the problem seems now to be…

Abstract

Marketing Myopia—misperceiving markets—is a well‐known marketing management problem, and most marketing executives are alert to it. However, the problem seems now to be reasserting itself concerning the guarantees that are offered with products or services. This is the conclusion of one hypothetical consumer, Jim Reed, a marketing executive, as he reports on the time it took to get a new suit properly altered. Jim's story ends as he was walking out of the store, and the store manager was apologizing for the difficulties. “We are sorry that it took four fittings, but we have been having trouble in our alterations room—our head tailor has been going through a divorce. The next time you come in, I am sure that we will have the tailoring right on the first try. We always give our customers what they want, no matter how difficult the request.” Jim just muttered, “But you have stolen my time!” The comment meant nothing to the perplexed manager. However, Jim was angered over the loss of the business and personal time involved with the additional fittings.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Eugene H. Fram and Bruce L. Oliver

Most organizations that market services can give clients a wide range of benefits as long as their clients are willing to to pay the negotiated price. These firms are…

Abstract

Most organizations that market services can give clients a wide range of benefits as long as their clients are willing to to pay the negotiated price. These firms are engaged in full benefit marketing. With some professional services, on the other hand, marketers can face restrictions on the benefits they offer clients. Such professional services firms are engaged in partial benefit marketing. Partial benefit marketing leads to conflict between clients and the providers of professional services. This article discusses the problems leading to the conflict and suggests what can be done to reduce the impact of problems and improve client relationships.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Eugene H. Fram and Riad A. Ajami

Many manufacturers use informal approaches to engage newinternational industrial distributors, relying on phone contacts,correspondence and bank referencing to gather…

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Abstract

Many manufacturers use informal approaches to engage new international industrial distributors, relying on phone contacts, correspondence and bank referencing to gather background information. Reports on a study to determine the desirability of top managers taking time to visit new international distributors in order to develop a contract and to lead in building interpersonal relationships. Commercial attachés or senior embassy officials were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on the proper role of American top managers in the development of international distributor contracts. Nearly all concluded that a managerial visit was necessary to conduct contract negotiations. About one‐quarter of the respondents felt that top officials from American firms needed to be involved. The majority reported the issues could be negotiated by any level manager who had power to act decisively on contract matters. In most cases, however, long‐term contracting responsibilities are usually reserved for people with top management status. Consequently, another international travel duty for top managers may be developing.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Stanley Widrick and Eugene Fram

Describes how negative products/services are perceived by consumersas an unpleasant necessity to avoid or reduce a disutility, the negativeconcept being based on the…

Abstract

Describes how negative products/services are perceived by consumers as an unpleasant necessity to avoid or reduce a disutility, the negative concept being based on the behavioural modification phenomena of negative reinforcement. Examines empirical data on 14 product categories associated with negative perception. Suggests a pragmatic method for marketers to distinguish between negativeand positive products in order to aid the making of effective strategic and tactical decisions for promotion, distribution, sales training and pricing.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Stanley Widrick and Eugene Fram

Negative products/services are seen by customers as an unpleasant buying necessity to avoid or reduce some disutility. The negative concept as it relates to products…

Abstract

Negative products/services are seen by customers as an unpleasant buying necessity to avoid or reduce some disutility. The negative concept as it relates to products/ services is based on the behavioral modification phenomena of negative reinforcement. Empirical data are presented in this article, which places fourteen product categories relative to the degree of negative perception associated with them. This procedure provides a model by which marketing executives can empirically determine whether their products/services are viewed as negative ones. This article is designed to: 1. Discuss the operant conditioning concepts of positive and negative reinforcement as they relate to purchasing and consumption behavior. 2. Suggest a pragmatic method for marketing practitioners to make distinctions between negative and positive products. 3. Aid marketers in examining the difference between the two to support the making of effective strategic and tactical decisions.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Eugene H. Fram and Gloria H. Lau

Claims post‐secondary institutions are facing two major problems ‐ enrolment declines and increases in operating costs. Suggests that, as the turmoil in higher education…

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Abstract

Claims post‐secondary institutions are facing two major problems ‐ enrolment declines and increases in operating costs. Suggests that, as the turmoil in higher education has accelerated, the research university seems to have lost public support, while the teaching university has been placed in a more favourable light. Reports on a pilot study of the public’s preferences for, and perceptions of, the research‐oriented and teaching‐oriented universities. Asks whether one or the other is more favoured by the US public. Presents the perceptions and preferences from 100 personal interviews, utilizing a psychological projective technique to gather the information.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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1 – 10 of 25