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Case study
Publication date: 10 October 2014

Hamad A. Al Ali and Syed Zamberi Ahmad

International business and/or strategic management.

Abstract

Subject area

International business and/or strategic management.

Study level/applicability

This case is useful for undergraduate and postgraduate level students majoring in international business management and/or strategic management.

Case overview

Etihad Airways was established in 2003, in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE) with the UAE government as sole owner. It is the national carrier of UAE with Abu Dhabi as its centre of operations. Etihad is recognized as a fast-growing player in the aviation industry, and has become one of the dominant international players in the industry in a relatively short time. Etihad's fleet now contains more than 67 planes, with more than 1,300 flights per week to diverse destinations across the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and North America. The company describes its business strategy as “sustainable growth”. Looking through a practitioner's lens, strategic partnerships have been the critical activities through which Etihad has delivered its strategy. The purpose of this case study is therefore to elaborate on its major and successful partnerships and the critical benefits of these. Secondary data were collected from credible sources including academic studies, relevant Etihad publications and industry reports published by official aviation associations.

Expected learning outcomes

Students will be able to understand the theory of strategic partnerships, their roles and benefits and critically evaluate the pre-staging “requirements” of such partnerships. In this case, the specific learning outcome of it is to help students to understand the importance of successful strategic partnerships for Etihad Airlines and how partnership strategies can improve the performance of Etihad Airlines.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Radhika Ramanchi, Sunita Mehta and Madhavi Vedera

This case helps students to analyze non-financial and financial aspects of a company and observe quantitative and qualitative aspects of decisions and decide whether to…

Abstract

Subject area

This case helps students to analyze non-financial and financial aspects of a company and observe quantitative and qualitative aspects of decisions and decide whether to invest or not and give suggestions to sell, buy or hold stocks. The case is expected to help the students understand and analyze the following points: the overall performance of the company and industry, how fundamental and technical analysis is applied to reach investment decisions, the areas where Jet Airways occupies the top position compared to peer group (competitor analysis), the company’s financial position and valuation with the help of tools and techniques and suggestions and observations to shareholders whether to buy/sell or hold shares.

Study level/applicability

This case can be used for MBA (Finance) students on equity research and valuation. Students are introduced to the fundamental procedures of equity research and analysis – evaluating sector desirability, financial modeling, equity valuation methods. To enhance research skills, students are required to acquire basic knowledge on macro and micro economic indicators. This case helps students to analyze non financial and financial aspects of a company and observe quantitative and qualitative aspects of decisions and decide whether to invest or not and give suggestions to sell, buy or hold stocks.

Case overview

Mr Rahul, a consultant in Karvey brokerage house was about to leave the office on the evening of March 24, 2015 when the phone rang. It was Mr Srirag, one of his clients and close friends who was passionate about investing in shares. Mr Rahul with his two decades of experience in monitoring and advising various investment plans has been continuously advising Srirag on different investments in shares. Srirag said “Rahul! You know that I bought many shares in Jet Airways. While studying the annual reports of Jet Airways 2014-2015 about its business profits and losses, I came across a January to March, 2013 business quarter analysis report that wrote about Jet Airways facing a net loss of 4.95 billion rupees due to over debt burden and interest costs. It also stated that the company sold a 24 per cent stake in 2013 to Etihad for 332$ million which is an Abu Dhabi based airline. The news said that the deal would help the company overcome financial challenges, raise cash, cut costs and gain access to the global flight network. I am worried about whether this deal would allow the company to continue its operations from India or not. I am also concerned about the downfall of Kingfisher, a major setback in the aviation industry in India that owes 8,000 crores to its employees, banks, airports, oil companies. I am worried that either my investment in Jet Airways might bring huge losses or the partnership with Etihad airways would result in the reduction of costs and due to joint sales efforts, sharing resources and network integration thereby leading to a valuable share price. Since your guidance has helped in many issues, I would like to know the present condition and future prospectus prevailing in Jet Airways”. With a lot of ambiguity in his mind, he asked Rahul to recommend if he should hold or sell the shares in Jet Airways.

Expected learning outcomes

The case is expected to help the students understand and analyze the following points: the overall performance of the company and industry, how fundamental and technical analysis is applied to reach investment decisions, the areas where Jet Airways occupies the top position compared to peer group (Competitor analysis), the company’s financial position and valuation with the help of tools and techniques and suggestions and observations to shareholders on whether to buy/sell or hold shares.

Supplementary materials

The link to the following videos to be sent to participants in advance to help them prepare for the class. www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3XJXTmILyk, Equity Research Presentation: Coca-Cola, www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5pEK_2uItg Write Equity Research Report, format, process, www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMLJccgiSTk Equity Valuation and Analysis-Part I.

Subject code

CSS 1: Accounting and Finance.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Melodena Stephens Balakrishnan, Payyazhi Jayashree and Ian Michael

Strategy, Emiratisation (national policy); human resources (recruitment, training and development, organizational culture and values) and marketing (branding…

Abstract

Subject area

Strategy, Emiratisation (national policy); human resources (recruitment, training and development, organizational culture and values) and marketing (branding, communication), tourism (destination image).

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and Postgraduate Business and Management.

Case overview

This case highlights the strategy and initiatives taken by Etihad to attract Emirati employees (local nationals) to join the organization. Etihad Airways is the national airline of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), based in Abu Dhabi, the national capital. Since its inception in 2003, the airline has grown faster than any other in commercial aviation history; it currently flies to more than 60 destinations in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, the Middle East and North America. In the UAE, nationals or Emiratis comprise only 20 per cent of the overall population. According to the UAE 2021 Vision, the government's focus is on building the human capabilities on knowledge and innovation for Emiratis. This vision is reinforced in the Abu Dhabi Economic Vision 2030, which aims to boost national participation, encourage women (national women are on average more highly educated than the men) and decrease the education – market demand gap through training.

Expected learning outcomes

This case can be used to teach strategy from the point of view of government, human resources and marketing. From the government point of view parallels can be drawn to other nations whose government have focused on policies to create opportunities for and to encourage local employability. An example of a similar programme that was very successful is the “Bumiputra” programme created for indigenous Malaysians in 1971. In the area of human resource strategy, recruitment, training, inculcation of corporate values are some areas that can be reinforced. Form the point of view of marketing; the case can be used to discuss branding from the point of view of people, loyalty building (internal) and communication (internal and external). Destination branding and the role airlines play can also be a discussion point from the strategic point of view with some opportunity for macro-environmental analysis using the PESTLE model.

Supplementary materials

A teaching note available upon request.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Terence Ping Ching Fan

The rise of Emirates, Etihad, and Qatar Airways in the Middle East (collectively referred to as “ME3”) has been absolutely dramatic. How should other full-service carriers…

Abstract

The rise of Emirates, Etihad, and Qatar Airways in the Middle East (collectively referred to as “ME3”) has been absolutely dramatic. How should other full-service carriers respond? This study takes a look at how one carrier, Singapore Airlines, has responded and may offer clues to how others may choose to respond. Facing ME3’s ascent in service quality and rapid capacity expansion, Singapore Airlines stuck to its niche as a premium carrier and refrained from tit-for-tat type competition. It managed to command a fare premium in select markets even in the presence of ME3, but had to sacrifice growth in its passenger count. This offers valuable lessons for other full-service carriers.

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Donelda S. McKechnie, Jim Grant and Marios Katsioloudes

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the four strategy tools of positions and positioning: leader, challenger, follower and niche. It suggests that it is important for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the four strategy tools of positions and positioning: leader, challenger, follower and niche. It suggests that it is important for managers to understand where their business fits in the market, vis‐à‐vis the competition. Without this knowledge, it is difficult to identify a differential advantage that will give the necessary competitive edge to attract the target customer.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews positioning using a back to basics explanation. A simply constructed matrix – represented by variables: company‐focused or competition‐focused and pushes the boundaries or stays within boundaries – illustrates business philosophy in the marketplace.

Findings

Airlines positioned in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) aviation industry exemplify a market environment with companies holding distinctive positions. Emirates Airline is the leader, Etihad Airways is the challenger, Gulf Air is the follower and Air Arabia is successfully established in the niche position. A summary explanation of business operations for each airline supports the discussion.

Practical implications

Marketing practice aligned with textbook theory is identified in the growth‐oriented UAE aviation industry. In real‐world terms, four airlines distinctively hold each of the four positions while a fifth airline is making inroads into the regional market and appears to be challenging the current challenger.

Originality/value

The strategy simply stated in this paper suggests that the market environment is dynamic and constant assessment is necessary. Managers seeking to maximize differential advantage vis‐à‐vis the competition should consider using more than one strategy tool particularly if it contributes to a manager's ability to understand the market environment.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Shashank Kathpal and Asif Akhtar

The competitive environment of the Indian aviation industry is studied using Porter's five forces model. The SWOT analysis is used to examine the competitive position of…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The competitive environment of the Indian aviation industry is studied using Porter's five forces model. The SWOT analysis is used to examine the competitive position of Jet Airways. The role of Merger & Acquisition in the current Jet Airways crisis is also examined. Relevant texts studied are as follows: Kazmi, A. and Kazmi A. (1992). Strategic Management. McGraw-Hill Education; and Porter, M. (2008). The Five Competitive Forces That Shape Strategy. Harvard business review. 86. 78–93, 137.

Research methodology

This data for this case was extracted from secondary sources. These sources comprise newspaper articles, reports from the industry, reports of the company and the company's website. For gaining clarity over concepts, strategic management book by Azhar Kazmi and Adela Kazmi was referred. This case also uses websites such as moneycontrol.com to analyze financial health of the company. In the end, this case also uses some existing reports from the sources like World Bank and plane spotters to analyze the status of Jet Airways and also Indian aviation industry. This case has been tested in the classroom with MBA students in a class of Business Policy and Strategic management.

Case overview/synopsis

The Jet Airways, which once had the largest market share in the Indian aviation industry, has reached bankruptcy. Mr. Naresh Goyal, known for his aggressive expansion strategies, has already filed for bankruptcy. This case presents how buying aircrafts' obsession with poor choices on Mergers/Acquisitions could result in bankruptcy. The same could be substantiated from the fact that Goyal had many (197) of his fleet's latest aircraft. Goyal was also criticized for buying Sahara Airlines, which was performing poorly in the market. Spending a large portion of the budget in capital expenditure in an industry where operational cost is very high, only the cost of turbine fuel amounts to 50% of total operational expense. The high expenditure on capital budget and increasing operational cost weaken the financial position of Jet Airways. Despite earning decent revenue and having the highest market share in 2010, Jet Airways made losses in three consecutive years, i.e. from 2009 to 2011. After 2011, when the Indian aviation industry witnessed a high level of competition and growth in low-cost carriers (LCC), Jet Airways' survival was up for a toss. Despite the desperate measures of cost-cutting and attracting potential investors, Jet Airways reached the verge of bankruptcy. The current case emphasized the need to balance safe and riskier options, even for the market leaders like Jet Airways could fail due to poor strategic choices. This case presents some harsh realities on funds allocation. In 2010, where Jet Airways secure the highest market share and decent total revenue, it realized net losses. The case study also explains the need to adapt to the dynamics of the industry. After 2011, when LCC started dominating the Indian aviation industry, Jet Airways did not change its operation strategy and facing severe consequences. The case was about the poor strategic decisions taken by the founder of Jet Airways, Mr. Naresh Goyal, which adversely affected the health of the airline. The case also explores the possible strategic choices that Goyal could have taken to ensure Jet Airways' survival. Through this case, an attempt had been made to highlight the importance of various concepts that we need to understand while making a strategic decision for any organization. In the end, this case emphasized the role of strategy in managing an organization successfully.

Complexity academic level

The case study's target group should be Undergraduate and Postgraduate students of the Management discipline who study Strategic Management as a specialization or as the subject. This case can also be used in the Management Development Program for senior executives taking any vocational course or workshop on Business Strategy. The case focuses on one of the fastest emerging markets, i.e. India, and could be proven valuable for many multinationals companies. The case presents the changing competitive dynamics of the Indian aviation industry. The central theme on which the case revolves is the importance of sound strategic choices in a dynamic market or industry. After analyzing the case, the students would understand the complex nature of strategic decision-making and any poor strategic decisions ripple effect. This case could teach essential strategic management concepts like "SWOT analysis" and "PESTEL analysis." This case should be used to teach strategic management concepts only and not act as a judgment tool for any organization.

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Satwik Upadhyay, Rayees Farooq and Nachiketa Tripathi

This case describes the vulnerability of the Indian aviation sector by highlighting the fall of Jet Airways from one of the biggest airlines in India to bankruptcy. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This case describes the vulnerability of the Indian aviation sector by highlighting the fall of Jet Airways from one of the biggest airlines in India to bankruptcy. The present case discusses the role of Jet Airways' leadership in managing the external threats that affect aviation business in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The present case is built on data collected from secondary sources, including publicly available information about the company, journals, websites, newspapers and reports.

Findings

The case reports findings of how hubris-driven strategic decisions and insecurity of the leader in losing control of the company, led to the grounding of one of the major airline companies in the Indian aviation industry.

Originality/value

The present case study provides valuable insights into the aviation industry in India, focusing on the threats to the aviation business. The case is useful to other airline companies and the aviation business community in dealing with external threats to business and issues of leadership dysfunction.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 1 June 2016

Europe's airline industry.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB211426

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Abdulla Hamad MA Fetais, Osama Sam Al-Kwifi, Zafar U Ahmed and Dang Khoa Tran

In 2017, Qatar Airways was recognized as the world's number-one airline by SKYTRAX World Airline Awards. These international awards have been described as “the Oscars of…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2017, Qatar Airways was recognized as the world's number-one airline by SKYTRAX World Airline Awards. These international awards have been described as “the Oscars of the aviation industry,” reflecting global recognition and excellence in conducting business activities at the international level. The main purpose of this case-based research is to explore and evaluate the internationalization strategies employed by Qatar Airways in becoming known as one of the best airlines in the world.

Design/methodology/approach

In accordance with the nature of this study, data were collected by interviewing managers from Qatar Airways as well as by exploiting supporting materials from secondary sources and airline-specific records. The recorded interviews were analyzed via content analysis to define airline strategies aimed at expanding globally and building a global brand.

Findings

The findings reveal that Qatar Airways has adopted effective strategies that have facilitated its aggressive global expansion and enhanced its global consumer recognition – mainly as a fast-growing network connecting important destinations that maintains a focused consumer orientation dedicated to providing an optimal travel experience. These strategies have been focused on building a superior consumer experience marked by exceptional comfort.

Practical implications

Qatar Airways' implementation of internationalization strategies in the airline industry represents an innovative approach marked by efficient operations and high-quality standards. Both international business managers and academics can learn from these strategies and their implications for enhancing airlines' global reputation and overall quality performance.

Originality/value

Unlike other research studies that investigate a wide range of firms across industries, this study focuses on exploring the factors that support the successful internationalization of a single firm, thus providing in-depth understanding of specific strategies to achieve global recognition. This study provides unique insights to analyze strategies and assess their practical relevance.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Saleh Fahed Alkhatib and Yazan Khalid Abed-Allah Migdadi

This study aims to evaluate and rank green airlines by proposing a novel approach that integrates different multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate and rank green airlines by proposing a novel approach that integrates different multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

Three MCDM techniques were adopted: Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) addressed the impact relationships between Airline Green Operations (AGOs) and classified them into cause and effect; analytical hierarchy process (AHP) prioritized these actions and found their global and local weights; and Techniques to Order Preferences by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) used the weighted actions to evaluate and rank 20 green airlines as a case study.

Findings

DEMATEL outcomes provide the first AGOs impact relationships map (IRM), classify AGOs into cause and effect actions and provide better understanding how these green operations affect each other. According to the AHP outcomes, “GHG1and fuel” and “GHG2 and Energy” were the most important set of actions, respectively. Finally, a new evaluation and ranking for 20 green airlines has been presented.

Practical implications

The AGOs IRM provides a better understanding of the airline green operations and how they affect each other. The new evaluation and ranking technique helps airlines to identify their green strength and weakness areas and supports their sustainability processes.

Originality/value

The increasing importance of AGOs evaluation and analysis highlights the importance of green airlines studies like this one. This study analyzed AGOs, their impact relationships, developed their IRM and provided a new worldwide green airline benchmarking base.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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