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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

W. Vinck

The subjects which can form a basis of international co‐operation are considered in this article and in particular the scope and structure of ESRA, the composition and…

Abstract

The subjects which can form a basis of international co‐operation are considered in this article and in particular the scope and structure of ESRA, the composition and duties of the Steering Committee and the practical training and education actions that have so far been taken are examined in some detail.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Zonghuo Li, Wensheng Yang and Yinyuan Si

This paper investigates a dual-channel supply chain in which a manufacturer offers coupons in the online channel and the retailer in the offline channel. The optimal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates a dual-channel supply chain in which a manufacturer offers coupons in the online channel and the retailer in the offline channel. The optimal pricing and coupon promotion policies are explored, and the brand image under different promotion scenarios is studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Three differential game models, namely no coupon is offered, coupons offered by the manufacturer and coupons offered by the retailer, are constructed.

Findings

The results show that the manufacturer and retailer intend to conduct coupon promotions under a large coupon redemption rate. Coupon promotion derives a higher price and profit for the issuers, and the manufacturer can free-ride on the retailer's coupon promotion. The retailer's profit in the retailer-promotion scenario may be lower than that in the manufacturer-promotion scenario in some special conditions. Besides, price, coupon face value, brand image and profit increase over time. After multiple cycles game, the operational strategy evolves to an optimal equilibrium status.

Originality/value

This paper provides guidance and advice for dual-channel supply enterprises to implement joint pricing and coupon promotion strategies under multiple sales seasons.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Kiran Modukari, Salim Hariri, Nader V. Chalfoun and Mazin Yousif

Programming Sensor Networks currently is a subtle task not because of enormous amount of code but due to inherent limitations of embedded hardware like the power, memory…

Abstract

Programming Sensor Networks currently is a subtle task not because of enormous amount of code but due to inherent limitations of embedded hardware like the power, memory, network bandwidth and clock speed. In addition, there are very few programming abstractions and standards available which lead to close coupling between the application code and the embedded OS requiring understanding of low‐level primitives during implementation. A Middleware can provide glue code between the applications and the heterogeneity of devices by providing optimized set of services for autonomously managing the resources and functionality of wireless nodes in a distributed wireless sensor network. This paper presents an autonomous middleware framework for low power distributed wireless sensor networks that support adaptive sensor functionality, context aware communications, clustering, quality of service and faulttolerance. Finally an application on how to use the autonomous middleware is illustrated on the Envelope System Research Apparatus (ESRA).

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sabri Erdem, Esra Aslanertik and Bengü Yardimci

This paper aims to empirically examine the main determinants of the compliance level of disclosure requirements for IAS 16, as well as factors that may explain the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically examine the main determinants of the compliance level of disclosure requirements for IAS 16, as well as factors that may explain the differences in the levels of compliance within companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The association between the level of compliance and various corporate characteristics was examined using Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID) analysis in financial disclosures for IAS 16. CHAID analysis was applied to the manufacturing companies listed in Borsa Istanbul for the years 2012 and 2013.

Findings

It was found that the most significant factor is the auditor reputation within different nodes such as size or free float rate. In most of the studies, correlation is used to determine the association between different factors, but this study is the first one that uses the CHAID analysis which offers an adjusted significance testing, and at the same time classification of the interaction between variables.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides insights into the primary factors of disclosure compliance that help to improve the structure of disclosures and the level of compliance in preparing future financial reports. The proposed improvements will also support further developments in financial reporting regulations regarding disclosures. The key limitation in this paper is that it concentrates on a specific standard and only covers two years. However, it provides suggestions for one of the most important standards that includes various disclosures.

Originality/value

In addition, this paper fills a gap in the literature about the compliance level of specific standards such as IAS 16 and the usage of CHAID analysis in such studies. The results were consistent with some previous studies regarding the relationship between compliance level, auditor reputation and size and it also highlight the effect of different disclosure items on compliance level.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Esra Alniacik, Ezgi F. Erbas Kelebek and Umit Alniacik

The purpose of this study is to examine how – if any – does message framing moderates the previously documented positive effect of organizational identification on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how – if any – does message framing moderates the previously documented positive effect of organizational identification on unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used vignette methodology to manipulate message framing and organizational identification in a 2 × 2 between-subjects experimental design to test research hypotheses. In total, 332 undergraduate students in the senior year of banking and management participated in the experiment. Two-way analysis of variance was used for data analyses.

Findings

Message framing is found to moderate the effect of organizational identification on UPB. Organizational identification posed a stronger effect on intentions to engage UPB when a supervisor announces a critical situation by using a positively framed message than (s)he frames it negatively.

Research limitations/implications

Using undergraduate students as subjects is an important limitation to external validity and generalizability of the findings. More realistic field experiments can be conducted by using real employees and factual firms in future studies.

Practical implications

Managers should be careful when using over-motivating language to employees on critical issues. Under intense stress, a managerial message over-emphasizing “gain” can prompt highly identified employees to conduct misbehavior.

Social implications

Unethical behavior brings negative consequences for organizations, even if it is conducted for the benefit of the organization. To prevent any tendency toward UPB, management communication must clearly highlight the delicate boundary between being attached to the organization and going beyond the rules for the organizational goals.

Originality/value

The study findings shed more light on the relationship between organizational identification and UPB, allowing us to see that the relationship is not always linear. In addition to over-identification, reciprocity and neutralization processes, the framing may be another explanation to varying effect of organizational identification on UPB. Supervisors’ communication style can influence employee behavior in controversial issues linked to UPB.

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Mazen Ali, Esra Wali, Yousef Al-Hinai and Sherah Kurnia

Most studies of mobile commerce (MC) adoption by individuals have focused on the influence of a set of factors at a single point in time, and thus, cannot capture the…

Abstract

Purpose

Most studies of mobile commerce (MC) adoption by individuals have focused on the influence of a set of factors at a single point in time, and thus, cannot capture the process by which the individuals progress from simple to sophisticated MC adoption. This paper aims to enhance the current understanding of MC adoption by using a process approach to investigate MC adoption progression among individuals and the factors influencing their decisions to adopt different MC activities of varying complexity levels over time.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research design was used. Data were collected through a series of semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 22 users of mobile devices to understand how they progressed in MC adoption over time and the factors influencing their decisions to adopt different levels of MC activities. The data were analyzed using qualitative data analysis techniques.

Findings

The findings showed reciprocal influences between individuals’ perceptions and MC adoption. As individuals adopted and gained experience with basic MC activities, their perceptions of MC improved over time, leading to the adoption of more advanced MC activities.

Originality/value

This research proposes a novel process approach and an innovative MC Adoption Maturity model to explain MC adoption progression over a time dimension. The model includes three levels of MC adoption maturity and explains adoption progression from one level to the next. The concept of MC adoption maturity will enable researchers to understand changes in users’ experiences and perceptions throughout adoption maturity progression.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Yasemin Claire Erensal and Yıldız Esra Albayrak

This work attempts briefly to identify factors affecting the success of technology transfer in order to reduce the potential of incompatibilities in respect to micro‐ and…

Abstract

Purpose

This work attempts briefly to identify factors affecting the success of technology transfer in order to reduce the potential of incompatibilities in respect to micro‐ and macro‐ergonomics and to optimize the decision process of managers in DCs.

Design/methodology/approach

Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was selected as appropriate technique. The decision model developed in this research is specified in the context of micro‐ and macro‐ergonomics view of technology transfer in DCs.

Findings

Based on the AHP, it is possible to determine the global priority weights of different technology alternatives and examine the critical factors and benefits that affect the appropriateness of technology transfer based on micro‐ and macro‐ergonomics considerations. In its general form, the model provides a useful conceptual framework for evaluating alternative technologies in respect to ergonomics and suggests the ergonomics choices which must be made.

Originality/value

As noted above, this study is unique in its provides a holistic analysis of the risk factors that are expected to contribute to the inappropriateness of technology transfer, also provides a useful conceptual framework for evaluating alternative technologies and identifying incompatibility problems in respect to human factors, and can be extended to suggesting action for improving the decision process of managers.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2013

Manuel Vallée

Since the beginning of the 20th century environmental health researchers have known about the association between toxicant exposure and disease. However, that knoweldge…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the beginning of the 20th century environmental health researchers have known about the association between toxicant exposure and disease. However, that knoweldge has not been well integrated into mainstream medicine. Shedding light on why is the focus of this chapter.

Methodology/approach

To shed light on this issue I analyze the 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics’ clinical practice guidelines for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), focusing specifically on the omission of environmental health research pertaining to ADHD symptoms and exposures, such as lead and mercury.

Findings

I found that while environmental researchers have been documenting the link between lead and ADHD for over forty years, the American Academy of Pediatrics has completely omitted this research from its 2012 clinical practice guidelines. Moreover, I argue this omission can be traced to competitive pressures to protect medical jurisdiction, and a reductionist worldview that emphasizes treatment over prevention.

Originality/value of paper

This is the first attempt to analyze the way clinical practice guidelines help reinforce and perpetuate dominant medical perspectives. Moreover, to shed explanatory light, this chapter offers a synthetic explanation that combines materialist and ideological factors.

Research implications

Beyond the specific case of ADHD, this chapter has implications for understanding how and why environmental health research is omitted from other materials produced by mainstream medicine, such as materials found in the medical school curriculum, continuing medical education, medical journals, and on the medical association web sites.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Esra Memili, Kimberly A. Eddleston, Thomas M. Zellweger, Franz W. Kellermanns and Tim Barnett

Drawing on organizational identity theory, we develop a model linking family ownership and expectations, entrepreneurial risk taking, and image in family firms to explain…

Abstract

Drawing on organizational identity theory, we develop a model linking family ownership and expectations, entrepreneurial risk taking, and image in family firms to explain family firm growth. Testing our model on a sample of 163 Swiss family firms, we suggest that entrepreneurial risk taking and image can both lead to growth in family firms. We further find that family expectations have an influence on both entrepreneurial risk taking and family firm image. This finding suggests that family firms may benefit from two growth paths – forward looking risk taking and the image of the family firm that builds on the past, and that these paths are nurtured by family expectations.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Esra Memili, Hanqing Chevy Fang and Dianne H.B. Welsh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the generational differences among publicly traded family firms in regards to value creation and value appropriation in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the generational differences among publicly traded family firms in regards to value creation and value appropriation in the innovation process by drawing upon the knowledge-based view (KBV) and family business literature with a focus on socioemotional wealth perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tests the hypotheses via longitudinal regression analyses based on 285 yearly cross-firm S & P 500 firm observations.

Findings

First, the authors found that family ownership with second or later generation’s majority exhibits lower levels of value creation capabilities compared to non-family firms, whereas there is no difference between those of the firms with family ownership with a first generation’s majority and non-family firms. Second, the authors also found that family owned firms with a first generation’s majority have higher value appropriation abilities compared to nonfamily firms, while there is no significant difference in value appropriation between the later generation family firms and non-family firms.

Research limitations/implications

The study help scholars, family business members, and investors better understand family involvement, and how it impacts firm performance through value creation and value appropriation.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the family business, innovation, and KBV literature in several ways. While previous family business studies drawing upon resource-based view and KBV often focus on the value creation in family governance, the authors investigate both value creation and value appropriation phases of innovation process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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