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1 – 10 of 32
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Nicole A. Beatty and Ernesto Hernandez

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical concept of socially responsible pedagogy because it applies to teaching information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical concept of socially responsible pedagogy because it applies to teaching information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

At Weber State University, two librarians use a socially responsible pedagogical approach, combining critical information literacy and visual literacy to teach an undergraduate information literacy course.

Findings

Initial results suggest that the course design and the authors’ approach to socially responsible pedagogy are largely successful based on students’ application of course material to a signature assignment in the course.

Research limitations/implications

Data are limited because this approach was only used for two semesters. The authors are aware that a socially responsible information literacy classroom needs quality assessment to help make instructional decisions, evaluate teaching strategies and assist with ongoing student learning. Additional semesters of using this instructional approach will allow for reflection and critical inquiry into the theories and teaching strategies that currently inform instruction. Early implications of using this method of instructional design reflect students’ deep understanding of the importance of information literacy because they explore social justice topics.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this research reveal a theoretical framework for teaching critical information literacy, called socially responsible pedagogy. The theory looks at teaching based on the “spirit” of the course, which is the promotion of equality. It also looks at “the art” of designing an information literacy course, incorporating socially responsible pedagogy, culturally responsive teaching and critical information literacy. This study also looks at “the science” of assessment and offers suggestions on how one might go about assessing a socially responsible information literacy class. Moreover, the authors examine how visual literacy helps teach information literacy concepts in the course as students put together a signature assignment that meets both information literacy course objectives and general education outcomes.

Social implications

This general review of the theoretical concept of socially responsible pedagogy is limited to two semesters of information literacy instruction. In researching these topics, students situate themselves within a diverse worldview and work to promote awareness and advocacy through group presentations.

Originality/value

While librarians are exploring critical librarianship and social justice, many are not using socially responsible pedagogy combined with other social theories and images to help students work through the research process and develop information literacy skills.

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Michael James Mustafa, Ernesto Hernandez, Christopher Mahon and Lai Kei Chee

This paper aims to develop an empirical model that examines whether a student’s proactive personality or the university support environment (education support, concept…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop an empirical model that examines whether a student’s proactive personality or the university support environment (education support, concept development support and business development support) affects their entrepreneurial intentions. Additionally, the relative strengths of a student’s proactive personality and the university environment influences are compared.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 141 students attending a well-established and internationally renowned Malaysian higher education institution completed a questionnaire survey. Results were based on correlation and regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that a proactive personality and concept development support have significant impact on students’ entrepreneurial intentions. Additionally, the results showed that a student’s proactive personality had a greater effect on their entrepreneurial intentions than that of the university support environment.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates one of the few attempts to examine the effects of both a proactive personality and university support environment on entrepreneurial intentions in an emerging economy context. Specifically, we reconfirm students’ personality traits as a more important predictor of their entrepreneurial intentions than environmental factors in the Malaysian context. Additionally, by also demonstrating concept development support as a significant predictor of entrepreneurial intentions, we provide new insights into how universities in emerging economies can foster the entrepreneurial intentions of their students. This result adds to the academic literature on entrepreneurial intentions in emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

María Zayas-Ortiz, Ernesto Rosario, Eulalia Marquez and Pablo Colón Gruñeiro

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether there was a relationship between commitment and the behaviour of organizational citizenship among bank employees.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether there was a relationship between commitment and the behaviour of organizational citizenship among bank employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the outcomes of a doctoral dissertation, which was a case study combining a mix methodology. The results validated the conceptual model proposed by the researcher and answered the research questions. Measurement instruments used include the organizational citizenship scale and the organizational commitment scale, developed and validated by Rosario et al. (2004).

Findings

The paper finds that there is a positive correlation between the organizational commitment and the indicators of organizational citizenship behaviour and civic virtue, courtesy and altruism dimensions shown by the employees. The dimensions of affective and moral commitment had the strongest correlation with the civic virtue dimension of organizational citizenship.

Research limitations/implications

Sample consist only of private banking employees.

Practical implications

The organizations should support the affective and moral commitment in their personnel in order to develop strong citizenship behaviour.

Social implications

The organizational commitment with demonstrations of citizenship behaviour, civic virtue, and courtesy and altruism dimensions may impact the organization and the community creating a good base to improve the quality of life.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to study the relationship between organizational commitments and organizational citizenship behaviour in a sample of private banking employees in Puerto Rico.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 31 July 2019

CUBA: Further emergency economic measures likely

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Vincent Obedgiu, Vincent Bagire and Samuel Mafabi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) among local government civil servants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) among local government civil servants.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a cross-sectional survey research design with a response of 239 civil servants in the local government sector; data was collected using a questionnaire and quantitative approaches were used in analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that there is a significant positive relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour. The predictive power of organizational commitment on OCB is, however, lower than other similar studies in extant literature. Despite being significant, the coefficient of determination in the final model was very low raising thoughtful concerns hence recommendation for further analytical studies in the local government context in the African setting.

Research limitations/implications

The results in this study cannot be without limitations. The authors take a note of the sector that the authors studied, i.e., local governments, in which the authors may not have contextualized the concepts very well and had challenges of interpretation by the respondents. The authors were also limited by the lack of context-specific literature to underpin our discussion. The paper is also limited by the narrow scope of one region in Uganda and thus generalizability to the African level may be done with caution.

Practical implications

This study provides important implications to policy, practice and research. While policies provide for expected efficiencies and productivity, the authors note that an environment in which these are to be achieved is important when it promotes OCB. Policy makers should bear in mind behavioural elements for affective, normative and continuance commitment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge by finding further support for the relationship between organizational commitment and OCB, and advances a likely debate that among local government civil servants in a developing country context the predictive power could be very low. This possibly explains the efficiency gaps at this level of state governance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Cristina Chinea, Ernesto Suárez and Bernardo Hernández

The purpose of this study is to conceptually and empirically verify the meaning of the food construct, while adapting and validating the Meaning of Food in Life…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to conceptually and empirically verify the meaning of the food construct, while adapting and validating the Meaning of Food in Life Questionnaire proposed by Arbit et al. (2017) into Spanish and comparing groups with specific and non-specific eating patterns in relation to the meaning of food.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory factor analysis and multivariate analysis involving groups with specific and non-specific eating patterns.

Findings

Results show that the adapted version of the scale retained the five food meaning factors, although four items from the original version had to be removed. Multivariate analyses of variance show that there are significant differences in the moral and sacred factors of food meaning when comparing people with specific and non-specific eating patterns. Significant differences in the moral, sacred and social factors were found when comparing between people with a specific diet, vegans/vegetarians and people who do not consume gluten/lactose or are on a diet.

Research limitations/implications

Differences in the meanings attributed to food can be observed among the different ways people eat. This could have implications on ethics, sustainability and well-being by considering the characteristics of the five factors of food meaning.

Originality/value

This study suggests that food meaning is a complex and rational process, where eating patterns play a key role in the attribution of meaning.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Cristina Chinea Montesdeoca, Ernesto Suárez, Bernardo Hernández and Gladys Rolo-González

The paper aims to determine whether people with different eating patterns, specifically meat-free diets, engage in other types of eco-friendly behaviours and whether the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to determine whether people with different eating patterns, specifically meat-free diets, engage in other types of eco-friendly behaviours and whether the meanings attributed to food allow for a better understanding of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected between 2019 and 2020, on the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Different instruments were used: The meaning of food in life questionnaire (MFLQ; Arbit et al., 2017); the dietarian identity questionnaire (DIQ; Rosenfeld and Burrow, 2018) and the frugal behaviour scale (Muiños et al., 2015) and two items were used to identify the frequency with which participants purchased ecological or second-hand products. The final sample consisted of 202 participants who ate a vegan, vegetarian or omnivorous diet. Spearman's Correlations were performed and the Kruskal–Wallis statistical test was used.

Findings

People with a vegan or vegetarian diet purchased ecological (p ≤ 0.001) and second-hand products (p = 0.006) more frequently compared to omnivores. Furthermore, the meanings attributed to food, specifically the moral, sacred and health meanings, were related to differences in eating patterns (p ≤ 0.001), while also being related to some eco-friendly purchase and consumption behaviours. Lastly, frugal behaviour was only found to be related to the health factor of meaning in food (rs = 0.27).

Research limitations/implications

The measurement used to evaluate the purchase of ecological and second-hand products is very simple/the role of the meaning of food in guiding more eco-friendly behaviours and promoting less ecologically impactful eating patterns.

Originality/value

The study provides valuable information on how vegan, vegetarian and omnivorous diets relate to eco-friendly behaviours.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Tatiane Andreza de Souza Silva, Victor Silva Corrêa, Gláucia Maria Vasconcellos Vale and Ernesto Michelangelo Giglio

The purpose of this article is to investigate if and how social capital offline – stemming from face-to-face interactions – and social capital online – stemming from…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate if and how social capital offline – stemming from face-to-face interactions – and social capital online – stemming from social digital media – can influence early-stage entrepreneurs, i.e. ventures with up to 42 months of existence.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used herein a qualitative research approach. The method used was the case study. The authors investigated three early-stage entrepreneurs in order to achieve the objective of the paper. These entrepreneurs are both the unit of analysis and the unit of observation.

Findings

The outcomes of this research indicate (1) the combined importance of social capital offline and online; (2) the different performance of the two different types of social capital (they seem to operate in relatively distinct ways) and (3) the existence of recursiveness between resources stemming from the two social spheres (offline and online).

Research limitations/implications

As research limitations, the authors point out the following: (1) the use of semistructured interviews as the only data collection instrument; (2) the limitation of the outcomes to entrepreneurs only (3) the absence of information on the performance of the business ventures; the focus of the paper was only on establishing causality between social capital offline and online and entrepreneurial performance.

Originality/value

This paper provides important research contributions. Initially, the paper presents a range of offline and online variables, which can be used in further research. At the same time, the paper emphasizes the combined impact of social capital offline and online, expanding the literature related to entrepreneurship. Moreover, this study proposes the creation of an integrative model. Finally, the authors point out the need for new theoretical and empirical studies on the subject, which still presents a gap in the literature.

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1809-2276

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 26 May 2022

Conservative, continuity candidate Federico Gutierrez still appears to be Petro’s closest challenger. However, a late surge by populist Rodolfo Hernandez has shocked the…

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Marlenne G. Velazquez-Cazares, Ernesto Leon-Castro, Fabio Blanco-Mesa and Segio Alvarado-Altamirano

The purpose of this paper is to identify new formulations for evaluating corporate social responsibility using different aggregation information operators.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify new formulations for evaluating corporate social responsibility using different aggregation information operators.

Design/methodology/approach

The ordered weighted average (OWA) operator and its extensions, the induced OWA (IOWA) and prioritized OWA (POWA) operators are used to generate a new score for a Mexican enterprise with the corporate social responsibility (CSR) distinction.

Findings

The use of these operators allows for generation of different scenarios highlighting the relative importance of the elements. This information is useful for the government and companies to generate different evaluations depending on the specific characteristics of the region, state or municipality.

Originality/value

The use of aggregation operators in the traditional CSR formulation is presented. Likewise, the application of these new strategies to evaluate CSR is presented in a Mexican enterprise case to understand the steps that should be followed if the OWA operator and its extensions are to be used.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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