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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management,experience plays a crucial role. We learn from success, but we can learnmuch more from failure. Further…

Abstract

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, experience plays a crucial role. We learn from success, but we can learn much more from failure. Further, it is far better and cheaper when we learn from other people′s failures rather than our own. This monograph assesses the requirements of project management in relation to industrial projects, illustrating the factors that can result in failure by means of a series of case studies of completed and abandoned projects worldwide that have failed in one way or another. The key roles played by project planning and project cost control in meeting and overcoming the practical problems in the management of industrial projects are examined in detail. In conclusion the lessons that can be learned are evaluated and presented, so that we may listen and learn – if only we will.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 92 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

Ernest A. Stallworthy and Om P. Kharbanda

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, the project manager has a crucial role to play. This monograph assesses the requirements of project…

Abstract

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, the project manager has a crucial role to play. This monograph assesses the requirements of project management in terms of training and experience, demonstrates what sort of person the project manager should be, and also the role that should be played by the project team. In order to illustrate the manner in which the essential qualities in both the project manager and his team are displayed in action a number of completed projects worldwide are reviewed. Both successful projects and disastrous projects are used to demonstrate the way in which the problems encountered in real life can be met and overcome. In conclusion both the prospects and the problems that the future may hold for the project manager are assessed.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management,the engineering manager has a crucial role to play. The history of theengineer is reviewed and his/her…

Abstract

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, the engineering manager has a crucial role to play. The history of the engineer is reviewed and his/her possible present role in management is considered. Management objectives are outlined and defined and the specific role of the engineer emphasised. The best managers are leaders, in particular effective leaders of teams, and this is a management task well within the grasp of the engineer. The engineer′s specific training and initial experience give him/her special qualifications in this area. Indeed, there seems to be no reason why the engineer should not climb the management ladder right to the top, especially these days when technology is continually growing in importance. The demands made on the effective chief executive are outlined. It would seem that engineering management has come of age and that with the appropriate management training the engineer should be well capable of filling a senior management role.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

The concept of company culture is now playingan ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavourto work towards ever better companymanagement, particularly in the…

Abstract

The concept of company culture is now playing an ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better company management, particularly in the industrial field. This monograph reviews the history and development of both national and company cultures, and then goes on to demonstrate the significance of a culture to proper company management. Well‐managed companies will have both a “quality culture” and a “safety culture” as well as a cultural history. However, it has to be recognised that the company culture is subject to change, and effecting this can be very difficult. Of the many national cultures, that of Japan is considered to be the most effective, as is demonstrated by the present dominance of Japan on the industrial scene. Many industrialised nations now seek to emulate the Japanese style of management, but it is not possible to copy or acquire Japan′s cultural heritage. The text is illustrated by a large number of practical examples from real life, illustrating the way in which the company culture works and can be used by management to improve company performance.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

We are negotiating all the time: with customers, suppliers, tradeunions, our family ‐ indeed, all with whom we come into contact. Inbusiness, in particular, negotiation…

Abstract

We are negotiating all the time: with customers, suppliers, trade unions, our family ‐ indeed, all with whom we come into contact. In business, in particular, negotiation needs management. There are said to be eight stages in negotiation: prepare, argue, signal, propose, present the package, bargain, close and agree. At the proposal stage one must be clear about what one must achieve, what one intends to achieve, and what one would like to achieve. The approach to constructive and competitive negotiation, the role of consultation, how to cope with deadlock and conflict, cross‐cultural negotiation, and the art of compromise are reviewed. The development and use of teams in negotiation is also an important factor, needing careful assessment. Negotiation will nearly always involve conflict, but steps must be taken to ensure that the participants remain on friendly terms.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Robert Wareing and Janet Stockdale

The reliability and validity of decisions on selection, placement,appraisal and promotion made in employment interviews are questioned.The article concludes that a bias is…

Abstract

The reliability and validity of decisions on selection, placement, appraisal and promotion made in employment interviews are questioned. The article concludes that a bias is established early on in interviews and this is followed by a favourable or an unfavourable decision. Unfavourable information has a greater influence on interviewers. They seek information to support or refute their hypotheses whereby information that contradicts a hypothesis is ignored.

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Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

James Margol and Brian H. Kleiner

Executives must develop skills to manage management time as well asconventional time. Methods which improve skills include understandingtime‐space structures, using…

Abstract

Executives must develop skills to manage management time as well as conventional time. Methods which improve skills include understanding time‐space structures, using methods proposed by Peter F. Drucker, and managing one′s immediate management molecule as proposed by William Oncken. Unconventional time management techniques used by Harold Geneen, Ex‐CEO of International Telephone and Telegraph are also explored.

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Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Paul Holden

Private companies go public for a variety of reasons. Whatever themotive, shareholders and directors should have a clear understanding ofthe implications and…

Abstract

Private companies go public for a variety of reasons. Whatever the motive, shareholders and directors should have a clear understanding of the implications and responsibilities arising from this change of status. The author examines every aspect of public company status and presents an analysis of the feasibility of a stock market flotation by his company. This article provides valuable insight for companies considering a stock market flotation.

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Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Peter Johnstone

In England and Wales the Crown Prosecutor is a lawyer who is independent from the investigation and is charged with assessing evidence and evaluating whether a prosecution…

Abstract

In England and Wales the Crown Prosecutor is a lawyer who is independent from the investigation and is charged with assessing evidence and evaluating whether a prosecution should proceed or not. The CPS is intentionally authorised to override the decisions of the police to curb any potentially over‐zealous investigations and evidence gathering that might subsequently tarnish the standards of procedure in the courts when applying the criminal law. The increasingly burdensome rules of disclosure have made demands on the CPS which are akin to the overall requirement on the investigating magistrate of civil law jurisdictions to find the truth by examination of the prosecution and defence evidence. The recent moves to return a limited number of lawyers to police stations is a further indication that the future role of the CPS may include an active rather than solely passive role in evidence gathering. The Serious Fraud Office are directly involved in the investigation and prosecution of complex frauds. This office has statutory and judicial authority to conduct investigations which follow an inquisitorial rather than accusatorial model. The juge d'instruction in France has authority to direct and control police investigations and subsequently to compile a dossier of evidence for presentation before a trial court. This paper points out that there are close parallels emerging in pre‐trial procedures in England and Wales and in France and the criticisms of the role of the investigating magistrate, the ‘sick man’, may hold lessons to be learnt for investigators and prosecutors within this jurisdiction.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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