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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Erik Radio

Linked data technologies promise different ways of querying and retrieving information that enable individuals to have search experiences that are broader and more…

Abstract

Purpose

Linked data technologies promise different ways of querying and retrieving information that enable individuals to have search experiences that are broader and more coordinated than those common in current library technologies. It is vital that information technologies be able to incorporate temporal capabilities or reasoning to allow for the more nuanced interactions with resources, particularly as they change over time. The purpose of this paper is to assess methods currently in use that allow for temporal querying of resources serialized as linked data.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines philosophical models, experimental approaches and common standards to identify areas of alignment and divergence in their orientations toward serializing time and change as linked data. By framing approaches and standards within the context of philosophical theories, a clear preference for certain models of time emerge.

Findings

While there have been several approaches to serializing time as linked data, none have found their way into a full implementation by standards in common use. Further, approaches to the issue are largely rooted in one model of philosophical thought that is particularly oriented to computational approaches. As such there is a gap between methods and standards, and a large room for further investigation into temporal models that may be applicable for different contexts. A call for investigation into a model that can cascade in to different temporal approaches is provided.

Originality/value

While there are many papers concerning serializing time as linked data, none have tried to thoroughly align these to philosophical theories of time and further to standards currently in use.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Greta Kliewer, Amalia Monroe-Gulick, Stephanie Gamble and Erik Radio

The purpose of this paper is to observe how undergraduate students approach open-ended searching for a research assignment, specifically as it affected their use of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe how undergraduate students approach open-ended searching for a research assignment, specifically as it affected their use of the discovery interface Primo.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 undergraduate students were provided with a sample research assignment and instructed to find resources for it using web tools of their choice, followed by the Primo discovery tool. Students were observed for 30 minutes. A survey was provided at the end to solicit additional feedback. Sources students found were evaluated for relevance and utility.

Findings

Students expressed a high level of satisfaction with Primo despite some difficulty navigating through more complicated tasks. Despite their interest in the tool and previous exposure to it, it was usually not the first discovery tool students used when given the research assignment. Students approached the open-ended search environment much like they would with a commercial search engine.

Originality/value

This paper focused on an open-ended search environment as opposed to a known-item scenario in order to assess students’ preferences for web search tools and how a library discovery layer such as Primo was a part of that situation. Evaluation of the resources students found relevant were also analyzed to determine to what degree the students understood the level of quality they exhibited and from which tool they were obtained.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Scott Hanrath and Erik Radio

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the search behavior of institutional repository (IR) users in regard to subjects as a means of estimating the potential impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the search behavior of institutional repository (IR) users in regard to subjects as a means of estimating the potential impact of applying a controlled subject vocabulary to an IR.

Design/methodology/approach

Google Analytics data were used to record cases where users arrived at an IR item page from an external web search and subsequently downloaded content. Search queries were compared against the Faceted Application of Subject Terminology (FAST) schema to determine the topical nature of the queries. Queries were also compared against the item’s metadata values for title and subject using approximate string matching to determine the alignment of the queries with current metadata values.

Findings

A substantial portion of successful user search queries to an IR appear to be topical in nature. User search queries matched values from FAST at a higher rate than existing subject metadata. Increased attention to subject description in IR records may provide an opportunity to improve the search visibility of the content.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to a particular IR. Data from Google Analytics does not provide comprehensive search query data.

Originality/value

The study presents a novel method for analyzing user search behavior to assist IR managers in determining whether to invest in applying controlled subject vocabularies to IR content.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Erik Bohlin, Arnd Weber and Brigitte Preissl

New technologies provide new opportunities for radio spectrum allocation and frequency use. This article seeks to summarize papers that form a special issue on spectrum

Abstract

Purpose

New technologies provide new opportunities for radio spectrum allocation and frequency use. This article seeks to summarize papers that form a special issue on spectrum management, and to provide also some outlooks toward policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial gives an introduction to the selection of papers included in this special issue. The editorial lays out the basic questions guiding the debate about spectrum management and explains the contribution of the various papers to this debate.

Findings

The editorial points out the high social, political and economic importance of spectrum management, and the need for a critical discussion of regulatory approaches is emphasised.

Originality/value

The editorial summarizes papers for a special issue on spectrum management and will be of value to academics, business and policy makers.

Details

info, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Simon Forge and Colin Blackman

New technologies challenge the traditional view that the radio spectrum must be tightly controlled and the new orthodoxy that a market‐based approach is the most efficient

Abstract

Purpose

New technologies challenge the traditional view that the radio spectrum must be tightly controlled and the new orthodoxy that a market‐based approach is the most efficient way to manage the spectrum. This article aims to make the case for collective use of the spectrum.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a range of literature, both technical and economic, as well as the authors' opinions to describe the economic context, market and other models for spectrum allocation, technological advances in signal processing, and the way forward for assessing future spectrum management policy, with particular reference to Europe.

Findings

Technical advances, from research in the commercial domain and from release of military research, combined with the increasingly important economic need to facilitate innovation in new radio technologies, demand a debate on a new approach to spectrum management policy.

Originality/value

The paper brings together the economic and technical arguments in favour of collective use of the radio spectrum and will be of value to academics, business and policy makers.

Details

info, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Christina Grundström and Ian F. Wilkinson

Industry standards affect the diffusion and adoption of new technology and the competitiveness of individual players but their development is not under the direct control…

Abstract

Industry standards affect the diffusion and adoption of new technology and the competitiveness of individual players but their development is not under the direct control of individual actors. Examines the role and importance of personal networks in the development of industry standards on the basis of a case study of Ericsson’s involvement in the development of standards for 3G mobile telephony. Notes how relations among parties and many types of forums stemming from previous development and marketing involvement affect the complex set of interactions shape the bottom‐up self‐organizing way in which standards emerge. The case study has implications for our understanding of the way standards develop and for managers attempting to influence the outcomes.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2006

Maulin Patel, S. Venkateson and R. Chandrasekaran

A critical issue in the design of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks is the efficient utilization of resources such as scarce bandwidth and limited energy…

Abstract

A critical issue in the design of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks is the efficient utilization of resources such as scarce bandwidth and limited energy supply. Many routing schemes proposed in the literature try to minimize the energy consumed in routing or maximize the lifetime of the sensor network without taking into consideration limited capacities of nodes and wireless links. This can lead to congestion, increased delay, packet losses and ultimately to retransmission of packets, which will waste considerable amount of energy. This paper presents a Minimum‐cost Capacity‐constrained Routing (MCCR) protocol which minimize the total energy consumed in routing while guaranteeing that the total load on each sensor node and on each wireless link does not exceed its capacity. The protocol is derived from polynomial‐time minimum‐cost flow algorithms. Therefore protocol is simple and scalable. The paper improves the routing protocol in (1) to incorporate integrality, node capacity and link capacity constraints. This improved protocol is called Maximum Lifetime Capacity‐constrained Routing (MLCR). The objective of MLCR protocol is to maximize the time until the first battery drains its energy subject to the node capacity and link capacity constraints. A strongly polynomial time algorithm is proposed for a special case of MLCR problem when the energy consumed in transmission by a sensor node is constant. Simulations are performed to analyzed the performance of the proposed protocols.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Erik Hofmann and Jan Bosshard

The purpose of this paper is to summarize and analyze what is known regarding activity-based costing (ABC) applications in the context of supply chain management (SCM)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize and analyze what is known regarding activity-based costing (ABC) applications in the context of supply chain management (SCM). The authors present a reference framework for practical implications and areas for future research in intra-firm and inter-organizational environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings underlie a systematic review methodology. Research gaps and guidance for further publications are derived from the reference framework based on ABC and SCM literature.

Findings

The review illustrates four main areas for further research: determination of the role of management accounting in SCM (including supply chain finance), integration of time-driven ABC with radio frequency identification (RFID) technology and automatic data collection, analysis of inter-organizational management tools in supply chains in multiple negotiation rounds, and standardization of cost accounting data in supply chains.

Practical implications

The review provides practitioners with three main recommendations: ABC applications require a solid data basis, organizational readiness, commitment from senior management, and an ABC management philosophy; open book accounting for inter-organizational cost information-sharing purposes needs institutional arrangements and economic incentive systems; and sharing costs and benefits among supply chain members requires a change of managers’ mind-set.

Originality/value

This paper reveals practical implications and provides new directions for research based on the reference framework. The paper contributes to the interdisciplinary topic between SCM and management accounting by providing a structured overview of 87 peer-reviewed articles from 1992 to 2016.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Björn Wellenius and Isabel Neto

This paper seeks to examine current trends in spectrum management and implications for developing countries.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine current trends in spectrum management and implications for developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes the findings of an extensive review of recent literature on spectrum management. It addresses three questions: What is the case for spectrum management reform? What is the current debate on spectrum management all about? Why does this matter to developing countries?

Findings

Traditional spectrum management practice has led to technical and economic inefficiencies as well as obstacles to technological innovation. Two alternative approaches are being tried, one driven by the market (spectrum property rights) and another driven by technology innovation (commons). Practical solutions are evolving that combine some features of both. Although these changes are mainly taking place in high‐income countries, they are deeply relevant to developing countries as well.

Practical implications

Improving traditional administration of the spectrum in many developing countries would yield significant benefits, but governments may wish to consider moving straight into property rights or commons approaches. Countries at an early stage of building up spectrum management capacity may benefit from adopting new solutions from the start. These may be especially well suited for low‐ and middle‐income countries.

Originality/value

The paper offers a concise overview of major current trends in spectrum management, against which the responses of developing countries can be examined. The paper is extensively annotated and includes a selection of references, many of which are accessible online.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Björn Kvarnström and Erik Vanhatalo

The purpose of the paper is to explore the application of radio frequency identification (RFID) to improve traceability in a flow of granular products and to illustrate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the application of radio frequency identification (RFID) to improve traceability in a flow of granular products and to illustrate examples of special issues that need to be considered when using the RFID technique in a process industry setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines a case study at a Swedish mining company, including experiments to test the suitability of RFID to trace iron ore pellets (a granular product) in parts of the distribution chain.

Findings

The results show that the RFID technique can be used to improve traceability in granular product flows. A number of special issues concerning the use of RFID in process industries are also highlighted, for example, the problems to control the orientation of the transponder in the read area and the risk of product contamination in the supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

Even though only a single case has been studied, the results are of a general interest for industries that have granular product flows. However, future research in other industries should be performed to validate the results.

Practical implications

The application of RFID described in this paper makes it possible to increase productivity and product quality by improving traceability in product flows where traceability normally is problematic.

Originality/value

Prior research has mainly focused on RFID applications in discontinuous processes. By contrast, this paper presents a novel application of the RFID technique in a continuous process together with specific issues connected to the use of RFID.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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