Search results

1 – 10 of 28
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Renaud Garcia‐Bardidia, Jean‐Philippe Nau and Eric Rémy

This paper aims to study consumer resistance and anti‐consumption in the context of illegal downloading of cultural goods in France. This practice is socially constructed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study consumer resistance and anti‐consumption in the context of illegal downloading of cultural goods in France. This practice is socially constructed as deviant by marketplace actors' moral labeling. To that extent, deviant careers are adopted as an analytic framework to articulate these two concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive approach was used. The authors conducted 49 in‐depth interviews in 2009. The data collected were then analyzed to build the different steps of downloaders' careers and related identities and practices.

Findings

The deviant careers identified shed light on the social construction of resistant identities and specific consumption practices in which social learning and devices play a major role. Accomplished careers enable deviant lifestyles that could be assimilated to anti‐consumption in a mundane context.

Practical implications

This study could help economic actors to improve their understanding of illegal downloaders' statements, motivations, and behaviors. It gives them clues to anticipate the massive changes in consumer culture occurring through dematerialization of cultural goods.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the distinctive features of consumer resistance and anti‐consumption in a case of everyday and secret deviance strengthened by marketplace actors' moral labeling. It then helps to articulate these concepts through profiles related to downloaders' careers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Remi Joseph–Salisbury, Laura Connelly and Peninah Wangari-Jones

The purpose of this article is to show that racism is not only a US problem. Rather, racism is endemic and pervasive in the UK context, manifesting at every level of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to show that racism is not only a US problem. Rather, racism is endemic and pervasive in the UK context, manifesting at every level of policing. From stop and search, to deaths after police contact, the authors highlight long-standing and widespread racist disparities in UK policing. The authors therefore pierce through any delusions of UK “post-racialism” in order to show that, as protesters have reminded us, “the UK is not innocent”.

Design/methodology/approach

In this piece, the authors reflect on the Black Lives Matter protests of 2020. Whilst the catalyst was the death of George Floyd in the United States, the authors explore what the protests mean in the UK context. To do so, the authors draw upon recent high-profile examples of police racism, before situating those events within a wider landscape of racist policing.

Findings

Demonstrating that UK policing has to be understood as institutionally racist, the authors suggest that responses to police racism need to be radical and uncompromising – tweaks to the system are not enough. The authors therefore look towards defunding and abolition as ways in which one can begin to seek change.

Originality/value

The piece takes up the challenges set by this Black Lives Matter moment and offers a critical take on policing that seeks to push beyond reformism whilst also highlighting the realities of UK racism.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Eric J. Arnould and Craig J. Thompson

This paper reflects on the development of Consumer Culture Theory, both as a field of research and as an institutional classification, since the publication of Arnould and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reflects on the development of Consumer Culture Theory, both as a field of research and as an institutional classification, since the publication of Arnould and Thompson (2005).

Methodology/approach

This paper takes a conceptual/historical orientation that is based upon the authors’ experiences over the course of the 10-year CCT initiative (including numerous conversations with fellow CCT colleagues).

Findings

The authors first discuss key benchmarks in the development of the CCT community as an organization. Next, the authors highlight key intellectual trends in CCT research that have arisen since the publication of their 2005 review and discuss their implications for the future trajectories of CCT research.

Originality/value

The paper by Arnould and Thompson (2005) has proven to be influential in terms of systematizing and placing a widely accepted disciplinary brand upon an extensive body of culturally oriented consumer research. The CCT designation has also provided an important impetus for institution building. The 10-year anniversary of this article (and not incidentally the CCT conference from which the papers in this volume hail) provides a unique opportunity for the authors to comment upon the broader ramifications of their original proposals.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Jamasp Jhabvala, Eric Boillat and Rémy Glardon

Since pulsed lasers are mainly used in selective laser sintering (SLS) – contrarily to selective laser melting (SLM) – only the exterior of the powder particles is molten…

Abstract

Purpose

Since pulsed lasers are mainly used in selective laser sintering (SLS) – contrarily to selective laser melting (SLM) – only the exterior of the powder particles is molten while their core stays solid. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the binding mechanism between two particles of titanium powder.

Design/methodology/approach

A dedicated experimental setup is used to isolate the particles. They are then irradiated by the laser. SEM micrographs are taken at each step and image analysis is performed. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a thermal model allowing for the incorporation of the latent heat of fusion and for a realistic surrounding. The absorbed laser intensity is modeled by means of the Mie theory.

Findings

The growing of the interparticular necks and the volume of liquid formed for different repetition rates are measured and compared with numerical simulations. A good agreement is found. A new method to easily find the absorption coefficient of the laser into the grain and the heat exchange coefficient with the exterior is developed.

Originality/value

This paper leads to a better understanding of the necking phenomena involved in the SLS consolidation process. An experimental set‐up has been developed to observe and quantify the final state of a small amount of laser sintered grains. This process has been shown to be replicable and trustful. The thermal model leads to good predictions of the particle final sintering state.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 April 2021

Adriana White

Once synonymous with books, libraries now provide a growing number of community services. Simultaneously, autism rates have increased worldwide. Improved diagnostic…

Abstract

Once synonymous with books, libraries now provide a growing number of community services. Simultaneously, autism rates have increased worldwide. Improved diagnostic criteria have given us a clearer view of autism’s ­prevalence. Once thought to primarily affect nonverbal Caucasian males, we now know that autism crosses racial and gender lines. As the diagnosis rate of autism grows, so too does the importance of ­libraries. Libraries are a vital community space – a place to safely interact with ­others and observe social norms. Libraries also house books and stories, which are critical to language and social development. As autistic adults age out of school-based programs, libraries provide access to technology and a sense of structure. Sensory-friendly libraries, with elements of Universal Design, are also benefiting the greater community – making libraries better spaces for all patrons. As the number of autistic adults grows, so too does the number of autistic librarians. Generations of adults who grew up in the library are understandably being drawn to the profession. They are comfortable in the workplace and ­especially skilled for the job. Their input in the field should be encouraged. This chapter aims to provide an overview of the importance of libraries to the autistic community and identifies libraries as a significant place that can help communities to better serve the autistic individuals in their area. Strategies and ideas for libraries will be shared. Libraries can also serve as a potential workplace for autistic adults, and more outreach should be undertaken to encourage autistic librarians.

Details

Hope and a Future: Perspectives on the Impact that Librarians and Libraries Have on Our World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-642-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Rémi Jardat and Florimond Labulle

This study aims to explore inefficiencies that arise from public and private policy initiatives undertaken in suburbs and outlying localities, where various intersecting…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore inefficiencies that arise from public and private policy initiatives undertaken in suburbs and outlying localities, where various intersecting economic, educational, ethnic and geographical disadvantages mutually reinforce each other. The authors propose to transpose the cross-disciplinary concept of intersectionality from an individual and community-based level (i.e. encompassing a variety of racial, ethnic and socio-economic minority communities) to a locality-based context.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data underlying this study were based on a long-term field study drawing on both interviews and observations. A self-administered ethnographic research approach was combined with classic analyses of conversations transcribed verbatim, using qualitative coding.

Findings

The main actors’ inability to understand the concrete situations experienced by subjects residing in outlying localities, as well as the managers’ failure to cooperate and engage collectively to promote employment among these populations, can be explained by the ineffectiveness of the categories that were designed and used in carrying out managerial action, as part of corporate policy, and then implemented within factories. These findings are particularly well-illustrated by the relatively lower inefficiency of SMEs, which had more limited resources, as compared with the actions undertaken at production facilities run by large companies, even though the latter devoted considerable resources to vocational inclusion (recruitment, integration and job preservation) and efforts to combat discrimination.

Research limitations/implications

In identifying a new way to categorize a certain type of social dynamic driven by businesses and various social actors, the authors sought to overcome the epistemological obstacles that arise from relying on neo-institutional theory, which, when applied to the case at hand, would have merely resulted in mimetic similarities, without offering any means for unblocking the socio-economic factors that come into play. The limitations of the study are related to its strict temporal and geographic isolation (i.e. a two-year study examining three production facilities located within the same suburb north of Paris).

Practical implications

The authors hope the study will urge actors operating in the same disadvantaged locality to collectively address the multiple intersectional challenges that tend to render policies for social inclusion and economic development so difficult to implement within areas suffering from a myriad of socio-economic ills. The first step in that direction, the authors feel, consists in naming these intersectionalities adequately.

Originality/value

Using a rich empirical database, this paper aims to show the relevance of the concept of intersectionality beyond its traditional scope of application (disadvantaged minority communities and individuals) while directing interest toward a less anthropocentric level of analysis: the locality.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Fred J. Hay

Anthropology was a late‐comer to the Caribbean and only after World War II did the study of Caribbean culture and societies become less exceptional. Early in this century…

Abstract

Anthropology was a late‐comer to the Caribbean and only after World War II did the study of Caribbean culture and societies become less exceptional. Early in this century when anthropology was first making itself over as an ethnographic science, anthropologists concentrated on tribal peoples. For most of the post‐Columbian era, the Caribbean region, with a few minor exceptions, was without indigenous tribal societies. Even after anthropology turned its attention to the study of peasantries, Caribbean peasantries were ignored in favor of more stable and tradition‐oriented peasant societies in other parts of Latin America. When anthropologists began to study Caribbean peoples in a more serious and systematic fashion, they found that they had to develop new concepts to explain the variation, flexibility, and heterogeneity that characterized regional culture. These concepts have had a significant impact on social and cultural theory and on the broader contemporary dialogue about cultural diversity and multiculturalism.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Medievalism and Metal Music Studies: Throwing Down the Gauntlet
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-395-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

M. Isabel Sánchez-Hernández and Francisca Castilla-Polo

Intellectual capital (IC) has been shown to play a crucial role in promoting competitive success among cooperatives as well as in other types of organizations. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Intellectual capital (IC) has been shown to play a crucial role in promoting competitive success among cooperatives as well as in other types of organizations. However, cooperatives are rarely included in this line of research. This paper aims to analyze how IC in agrifood cooperatives influences their prominence by fostering responsible research and innovation (RRI), reputation and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model was developed based on a literature review, and a quantitative study was conducted, including a representative sample of the current most prominent Spanish agrifood cooperatives. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine the validity of constructs, path relationships and recent advances in the predictive model assessment.

Findings

This study’s findings show the specific role of human capital (HC) for enhancing social and structural capital in cooperatives. It was concluded that there is a need to revise and reconsider the role-played by IC in the cooperative movement.

Research limitations/implications

The main practical contribution is to offer a specific vision of IC for agrifood cooperatives in order to maximize their market prominence. Since the study was conducted in Spain and based on a cross-sectional research approach, even though the new methodological tool partial least squares (PLS) predict was used, the authors cannot affirm whether IC will have the long-term expected effects as assumed in this research and in all contexts of the agrifood industry.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study that has examined IC in agrifood cooperatives in Spain, with attention focused on the role of HC as a predictor of market success.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

1 – 10 of 28