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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Eric Ping Hung Li, Ajnesh Prasad, Cristalle Smith, Ana Gutierrez, Emily Lewis and Betty Brown

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential of visual (i.e. non-textual) research methods in community-based participatory research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential of visual (i.e. non-textual) research methods in community-based participatory research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on a case illustration of a photo- and video-voice campaign involving rural communities in British Columbia, Canada.

Findings

The authors find that visual research methods, in the form of photo- and video-voice campaigns, allow participants to form ties between their community and the broader sociocultural, natural and political milieu in which their community is located. The authors highlight the benefits of using such methodological approaches to capture an emic perspective of community building.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is twofold. First, this study uses a photo- and video-voice campaign to showcase the role of visuals in articulating community pride – that is, how locals construct identity – and a sense of belongingness. Second, by focusing its analytical gaze on the idea of “community,” this paper revisits the importance of active involvement of research participants in the execution of empirical studies. Ultimately, the authors urge organization and management studies scholars, as well as those working in the social sciences more broadly, to further explore the value of innovative community-based research approaches in future work.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Roger (Rongxin) Chen, Liang Wang, Eric Ping Hung Li and Guodong Hu

As entrepreneurial top management teams in multidivisional forms are typically treated in pertinent literature as the default organizational solutions for developing…

Abstract

Purpose

As entrepreneurial top management teams in multidivisional forms are typically treated in pertinent literature as the default organizational solutions for developing dynamic capabilities, the emerging innovative organizational forms tend to be overlooked, even though they could be a viable means of transforming established enterprises. The present case study examines how Haier's microenterprise and platforms influenced the firm's dynamic capabilities development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a qualitative case study of Haier Group Corporation in China.

Findings

The findings indicate that Haier employed a loosely coupled relationship between its headquarters and the microenterprises, developed quasi market-based exchange relationships and established peer-to-peer learning opportunities and coordination among its microenterprises. Data analyses further revealed that Haier has adopted three-step routines to capture market opportunities and enhance operational efficiency. This research extends the sensing-seizing-reconfiguration model typically recommended in the existing literature. It also demonstrates that organizational configuration is an important aspect of dynamic innovation. In summary, the study results showcase microdivisionalization as a new way for developing dynamic capabilities to better adapt to the ever-changing market environments.

Originality/value

In summary, our study showcased microdivisionalization as a new way for firms to change the organization structure and business strategies to better adapt to the ever-changing market environments.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Eric Ping Hung Li, Hyun Jeong Min and Somin Lee

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interconnection between the corporatisation of K-beauty and Korea’s nation branding exercise and its links with soft power…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interconnection between the corporatisation of K-beauty and Korea’s nation branding exercise and its links with soft power. Through the investigation of the transformation of Korea’s beauty industry, the authors seek to illustrate the inter-relationship of the market systems and national identification practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed the qualitative case study approach to examine the latest development of Korea’s medical tourism. Through analysing a variety of secondary data that associated to the latest development of cosmetic tourism, this paper presents the impact of the transformation and reconfiguration of Korea’s beauty industry on the country’s nation branding strategy and the development of Korea’s soft power in the global marketplace.

Findings

The findings highlight how Korea’s new cosmetic tourism industry contributed to the renewal of Korea’s nation brand in the global market. The findings also illustrate the interconnection of the emerging Korean popular cultural products (K-pop and K-beauty) in the regional and global marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

The findings demonstrate the role of market in re-defining a nation’s brand and identity. The findings also illustrate how market-driven strategy influences the development of a nation’s soft power in the regional and/or global marketplace.

Practical implications

The study shows that practitioners can be active agents in nation branding. Through highlighting strategies to develop soft power within and beyond the country boundary, this study shows how market agents, governments and other stakeholders can co-create a market system that transform and reconfigure the nation brand in the global marketplace.

Social implications

In additional to explore the transformation of the beauty industry in Korea, this paper also presents the history and transformation of the beauty standards in Korea and other Asian cultures. Such dialogue invites marketing and consumer researchers to further explore the role of history and culture in guiding the production and consumption of new (consumption) standards.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that connects the theory of soft power in nation branding and country-of-origin literature. The case analysis of the socio-historical development of K-beauty also demonstrates how non-Western cultural goods enter the international marketplace. In summary, this paper provides new conceptual framework that illustrates a new collaborative mechanism that engages government and practitioners to co-create new cultural norms and standards to the local and international markets.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Liang Wang, Eric Ping Hung Li and Xiaoya (Sara) Ding

The process of building dynamic capabilities remains understudied, although deliberate learning is posited to be the key to developing and maintaining dynamic capabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

The process of building dynamic capabilities remains understudied, although deliberate learning is posited to be the key to developing and maintaining dynamic capabilities in turbulent environments. Based on the case study of Kodak’s responses to the shift from traditional to digital technology in the imaging industry (1993-2011), the purpose of this paper is to examine the role of managerial cognition in building dynamic capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs case study and qualitative method approach.

Findings

The results reveal that, when facing environmental turbulence, deliberate learning is subject to routine disruptions through entrepreneurial activities, and these organizational routines and activities are determined by organizational schema. Organizational schema itself is updated as a result of managers’ ongoing interpretation of the organization’s fit with the environment. The study findings contribute to the organizational studies and management literature by highlighting the role of managerial cognition into the microfoundation of dynamic capabilities.

Originality/value

The results demonstrate managerial cognition, and organizational schema in particular, as a microfoundation of dynamic capability.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Magnum Man Lok Lam, Eric Ping Hung Li and Wing-Sun Liu

The purpose of the present study is to examine how local consumers disassociate themselves from migrants' acculturative practices and negotiate their identity through the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to examine how local consumers disassociate themselves from migrants' acculturative practices and negotiate their identity through the symbolic consumption of fashion.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this interpretive study were obtained via phenomenological interviews with locally-born Chinese youth in Guangzhou, China, to examine their acculturative consumption practices as well as their subjective experiences of perceived threats to their lifestyle imposed by the influx of outsiders. Snowballing and purposive sampling methods were adopted in recruiting the research participants.

Findings

Data analyses revealed that local consumers adopt three dissociative strategies (stigmatization, avoidance and self-assertion) in order to ascribe meanings to their fashion consumption practices as a means of resolving identity conflicts and differentiate themselves from the migrant consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This research offers a single perspective (i.e. that of local-born young consumers residing in Guangzhou) on the locals' attitudes aimed at distinguishing and negotiating their identities in an intercultural setting via specific fashion-clothing choices. This research has theoretical implications for the consumer acculturation theory and identity negotiation.

Practical implications

Findings yielded by the present study have important implications for commercial companies focusing on fashion consumption, in particular for marketing practices aimed at rural-urban identification and youth market segmentation.

Social implications

This study contributes to the existing discussion on consumer acculturation by offering an intracultural perspective to the understanding of local consumers' responses to migrants' acculturation. It also provides managerial insights for fashion retailers, prompting them to rethink their market segmentation strategies to address population mobility in the marketplace and better understand how it alters the in-between social relationships that result in different consumption patterns and practices.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing discussion on youth consumer acculturation theories by offering an intercultural perspective to the understanding of local consumers' responses to migrants' acculturation attempts. It also offers managerial insights for fashion retailers, prompting them to rethink their market segmentation strategies to address population mobility and better understand how it alters the social relationships that result in different consumption patterns and practices.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Russell Belk

The purpose of this review is to offer a summary of visual and projective research methods that have been applied or may be applied fruitfully in an Asian context…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this review is to offer a summary of visual and projective research methods that have been applied or may be applied fruitfully in an Asian context. Examples are provided and a delineation of the strengths and weaknesses of the methods is made.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a review article covering a number of different relevant methods and briefly reviewing studies that have been conducted in Asia using these methods.

Findings

The paper reviews five different uses of qualitative visual and projective methods in Asian consumer and market research: as archival data for analysis; as direct stimuli for data collection; as projective stimuli for data collection; as a means for recording qualitative data; and as a means for presenting qualitative findings.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that Asia contains a rich visual culture and that the research techniques reviewed offer compelling means for enhancing data collection, data analysis, and findings presentations from qualitative market and consumer research in Asia.

Originality/value

The paper brings together a diverse array of prior research illustrating the potential of the methods reviewed. In addition to discussing this research a number of references are provided for those wishing to examine these methods in greater detail and apply them to their own research.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Tung‐lung Steven Chang and Peter Ping Li

Legendary Chinese firms have employed e‐business strategies to strengthen their competitive positions in China for market expansion since the late 1990s. E‐business…

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Abstract

Legendary Chinese firms have employed e‐business strategies to strengthen their competitive positions in China for market expansion since the late 1990s. E‐business practices have resulted from the convergence of digital technology, intellectual property and customer supremacy. Such convergence is transforming the “old” industrial economy, which was built primarily on tangible assets, standardization, and stand‐alone players, into a “new and virtual” economy, which is being based primarily on intangible assets, customization, and connected players. E‐business requires an integrated alignment of technology, operation, strategy, structure, and human interaction in a continuously expanding network. Consequently, e‐business facilitates a new system—the Paradigm of Network Capitalism, which removes the boundaries of space, time, organization and individuals, and creates virtual communities of stakeholders with new demands for product/service and shared interest and cooperation.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Yung-Ting Chuang and Yi-Hsi Chen

The purpose of this paper is to apply social network analysis (SNA) to study faculty research productivity, to identify key leaders, to study publication keywords and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply social network analysis (SNA) to study faculty research productivity, to identify key leaders, to study publication keywords and research areas and to visualize international collaboration patterns and analyze collaboration research fields from all Management Information System (MIS) departments in Taiwan from 1982 to 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first retrieved results encompassing about 1,766 MIS professors and their publication records between 1982 and 2015 from the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan (MOST) website. Next, the authors merged these publication records with the records obtained from the Web of Science, Google Scholar, IEEE Xplore, ScienceDirect, Airiti Library and Springer Link databases. The authors further applied six network centrality equations, leadership index, exponential weighted moving average (EWMA), contribution value and k-means clustering algorithms to analyze the collaboration patterns, research productivity and publication patterns. Finally, the authors applied D3.js to visualize the faculty members' international collaborations from all MIS departments in Taiwan.

Findings

The authors have first identified important scholars or leaders in the network. The authors also see that most MIS scholars in Taiwan tend to publish their papers in the journals such as Decision Support Systems and Information and Management. The authors have further figured out the significant scholars who have actively collaborated with academics in other countries. Furthermore, the authors have recognized the universities that have frequent collaboration with other international universities. The United States, China, Canada and the United Kingdom are the countries that have the highest numbers of collaborations with Taiwanese academics. Lastly, the keywords model, system and algorithm were the most common terms used in recent years.

Originality/value

This study applied SNA to visualize international research collaboration patterns and has revealed some salient characteristics of international cooperation trends and patterns, leadership networks and influences and research productivity for faculty in Information Management departments in Taiwan from 1982 to 2015. In addition, the authors have discovered the most common keywords used in recent years.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Dorothy S. Jacobs

Call it a vertical file, an information file, a pamphlet file, or give it any one of a number of more creative titles. Regardless of its name, this file is likely to be…

Abstract

Call it a vertical file, an information file, a pamphlet file, or give it any one of a number of more creative titles. Regardless of its name, this file is likely to be the place in your library that will offer the best and most workable storage for what are commonly called “ephemeral materials.” Such materials include pamphlets, documents, clippings or photocopies from newspapers or magazines, newsletters, annual reports, flyers, maps, charts, pictures, posters, or occasional sample periodicals, any or all of which may be relevant to your library's collection.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Kenneth Lan

This paper gives a comparative analysis of the foundation of sinology in two Canadian universities. Despite not having diplomatic exchanges, Canada's new relationship with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper gives a comparative analysis of the foundation of sinology in two Canadian universities. Despite not having diplomatic exchanges, Canada's new relationship with the People's Republic of China (PRC) ignited a China interest in the Canadian academe. Through York University and the University of Guelph (U of G)'s experiences, readers will learn the rewards and challenges that sinology brings to Canadian higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers an overview of the historical foundation of sinology in the Canadian academe. Who pushes through this process? What geopolitical developments triggered young and educated Canadians to learn about China? This paper assesses York and Guelph's process in introducing sinology by relying on university archival resources and personal interviews. Why was York University successful in its mission, which, in turn, made into a comprehensive East Asian Studies degree option in 1971? What obstacles did the U of G face that prohibited it from implementing China Studies successfully?

Findings

After 1949, Canada took a friendlier relationship with the PRC than its neighbor in the south. As China–Canada relations unfolded, Canadian witnessed a dramatic state investment in higher education. The 1960s was a decade of unprecedented university expansion. In the process, sinology enjoyed its significant growth, and both York University and the U of G made their full use of this right timing. However, China Studies at the U of G did not take off. Besides its geolocation disadvantage, Guelph's top-down managerial style in the 1960s, which resulted in collegial disillusionment, was also a significant barrier to this program's success.

Originality/value

Before the Internet age, universities were the first venues for most Canadians to acquire their initial academic knowledge of China. After the Second World War, sinology became popular among students as China became one of the world's “Big Fives”. More Canadians became romanticized with Maoism while opposing America's containment policy. York and Guelph exemplified this trend in Canadian history. Contrary to popular belief, historian Jerome Chen did not establish York's China Studies. Likewise, an ex-US diplomat John Melby did not bring China into Guelph, sinology arrived due to individual scholastic initiatives. Visionaries saw envisioned China's importance in the future world community.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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