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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Stanley F. Slater, Eric M. Olson and Hans Eibe Sørensen

The purpose of this paper is to identify the components of a knowledge management system that contribute to superior new product program performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the components of a knowledge management system that contribute to superior new product program performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive review of the academic and managerial literatures that deal with knowledge management's contribution to superior performance was first undertaken. After identifying gaps in the literature, a comprehensive model of a knowledge management system was developed. Where possible, existing measures of the constructs in this model were utilized. A questionnaire was developed, a commercial mailing list purchased, and a two wave mailing which produced a 15.8 percent response rate conducted.

Findings

The paper finds that customer intelligence generation, competitor intelligence generation, technological intelligence generation, and intelligence dissemination all contribute to the stock of knowledge assets (p<0.05). It was also found that, after controlling for influences on new product performance, a knowledge‐based strategy fully mediated the knowledge asset‐new product program performance relationship (p<0.05).

Research limitations/implications

This is a cross‐sectional study so causality should not be implied. The study was conducted among companies competing in high‐tech industries so there may be questions about generalizability.

Practical implications

Within the limitations of the research design, this study demonstrates the components of a knowledge management system. It provides numerous examples of the techniques utilized and companies that utilize them.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the components of a knowledge management system that contribute to superior new product program performance.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Jamil Anwar, S.A.F. Hasnu, Irfan Butt and Nisar Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to find out the most influential journals, articles, authors and the subject areas where Miles and Snow typology is used. The study identifies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the most influential journals, articles, authors and the subject areas where Miles and Snow typology is used. The study identifies the opportunities for future research as well.

Design/methodology/approach

Review is based on 196 journal articles selected through a systematic and rigorous search process from the four databases: ProQuest, Business Source Complete, Willy and Science Direct. Total Citation, threshold citations, fractional citation and citation per year techniques are used for analyses.

Findings

Strategic Management Journal (SMJ), Academy of Management Journal (AMJ) and Journal of Marketing (JOM) are the most influential Journals. The most influential and prolific articles on the subject are from Hambrick (1983), Conant et al. (1990), Doty et al. (1993), Sabherwal et al. (2001), Desarbo et al. (2005) and Fiss (2011). Management, strategic management and marketing are the most studied subject areas.

Originality/value

Although there have been many reviews of the literature on this typology, the systematic review on Miles and Snow typology to find out the most influential journals, authors, articles and subject area has not been done before.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Heejung Ro, Eric D. Olson and Youngsoo Choi

This exploratory study aims to examine gay travelers’ travel psychographics (allocentricity and psychocentricity) in relation to openness about sexual orientation…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to examine gay travelers’ travel psychographics (allocentricity and psychocentricity) in relation to openness about sexual orientation, collective self-esteem and socio-demographic variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is developed and study participants are recruited from attendees at a large annual gay event. A total of 196 gay men were used as samples for correlation analysis and independent samples t-tests.

Findings

The findings suggest that collective self-esteem is positively correlated with allocentricity. Also, gay couples showed higher allocentricity than single gay men, and white/Caucasian gay men showed higher allocentricity than other ethnic minorities gay men. Yet, psychocentricity was higher for lower income gay men than higher income gay men.

Practical implications

Tourism marketers should recognize that the gay market is not as homogenous as it has been portrayed in the tourism literature. Hospitality service providers and destination marketers should be aware of the importance of the gay community, gay travelers’ psychographics and, more importantly, the diversity within the gay market to develop effective products and services to better position themselves in this niche market.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the tourism literature by enhancing the understanding of gay travelers’ socio-demographic profiles and their travel-related behaviors and perceptions.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 72 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Eric Olson and Heelye (Jason) Park

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of physical servicescape, social servicescape and age on gay consumers’ evaluations of a LGBT advertisement of a gay…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of physical servicescape, social servicescape and age on gay consumers’ evaluations of a LGBT advertisement of a gay bar of a gay bar.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 2 × 2 experimental design was used to test the effects with a sample of gay males in the USA. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA and bootstrapping mediation.

Findings

Results of this study indicate a statistically significant three-way interaction effect of the two independent variables and age on the gay bar’s perceived LGBT (lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender)-friendliness. Perceived friendliness mediated the effects of the independent variables on behavioral intentions. Furthermore, the mediation effect was moderated by the age cohort.

Research limitations/implications

The findings indicate a changing perception of gay servicescape between the older and younger gay men. Implications for hospitality managers are provided.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the servicescape literature by expanding the realm of research to gay servicescape and gay consumers, an emergent and more visible hospitality segment.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Eric Monroe Olson, Rebecca Duray, Cary Cooper and Kai Monroe Olson

Prior research has argued that business practices within English football clubs are amateurish and outdated due to the comparatively small size of clubs and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research has argued that business practices within English football clubs are amateurish and outdated due to the comparatively small size of clubs and the restrictive nature of the cartel-like industry they compete in. But is this true for large EPL clubs (i.e. those with high market valuation and large number of employees)? Do these clubs have the ability to pursue alternative business strategies, and if so, do their organizational structures, cultures, and behavioral norms support the strategic directions they have chosen to pursue? The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates survey responses from 35 executives and business managers within three large EPL clubs. The study utilizes previously validated scales to examine issues of organizational structure, culture, and behavioral norms.

Findings

Despite operating within a closed industry, large EPL clubs are not all pursuing identical business strategies. Consistent with contingency theory, the organizational structure, culture, and behavioral norms of large EPL clubs are, for the most part, in line with what the authors would expect to find in successful, large conventional product or service businesses. However, all of the clubs included in this study appear to be following hybrid models each demonstrating characteristics of several alternative competitive strategies simultaneously.

Research limitations/implications

This initial study is limited to responses from 35 business executives and managers within three EPL clubs.

Practical implications

Although EPL clubs operate within a cartel-like industry, this study shows that business managers within these clubs do have a degree of latitude in choosing between alternative competitive strategies. In order to successfully implement a chosen strategy, business managers must insure that the organizational structure, culture, and behavioral norms within the club’s business group are aligned with the overarching objectives of that strategic choice.

Originality/value

Grounded in open systems and contingency theory, the authors challenge the conventional wisdom that because large clubs are in the business of sport they are somehow fundamentally different from other large businesses.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Michelle Veyvoda, Thomas J. Van Cleave and Laurette Olson

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged…

Abstract

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged teaching and learning can prepare students to become ethical healthcare practitioners. The authors infuse examples from their own courses throughout the chapter, mostly from the clinical fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, and occupational therapy. However, the chapter is applicable and generalizable to faculty from a wide scope of allied health training programs. The chapter introduces considerations for establishing campus–community partnerships in an ethical manner, as well as ways to foster student self-reflection and critical thinking through an ethical lens. Principles from the codes of ethics of various allied health professions are incorporated throughout the chapter along with examples of how each can be applied in community-based clinical experiences. Through a review of relevant literature, analysis of professional codes of ethics, case-based examples, and a step-by-step guide to course development, this chapter provides readers with a mechanism to ground their courses in professional ethics in a way that is relatable and relevant to students.

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

M.S. Foulds and L.R. Foulds

The selection and evaluation of CD‐ROM disks are important steps in the planning of a CD‐ROM facility. The choice of databases depends upon, among other factors, the…

Abstract

The selection and evaluation of CD‐ROM disks are important steps in the planning of a CD‐ROM facility. The choice of databases depends upon, among other factors, the objectives of the library, the projected use of each disk, and financial considerations. In this article we review the literature that deals with these matters. We begin with what is available on disk selection, via both printed directories and in the journals. We next discuss reported methods of disk evaluation. Finally, we cover existing reviews of various CD‐ROM products.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Hannelore B. Rader

Since 1973, Reference Services Review has published an annual annotated bibliography of materials focused on library instruction and, most recently, information literacy…

Abstract

Since 1973, Reference Services Review has published an annual annotated bibliography of materials focused on library instruction and, most recently, information literacy. Publications addressing academic library activities continue to be represented in the largest numbers. The continuing growth of electronic information has made librarians, in all types of libraries, more aware of the need to provide ongoing instruction to library users.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Hannelore B. Rader

The following annotated list of materials on providing library orientation to users and instructing them in library and information skills is the tenth annual review of…

Abstract

The following annotated list of materials on providing library orientation to users and instructing them in library and information skills is the tenth annual review of this literature and covers publications from 1983. A few items have not been annotated because the compiler was unable to secure a copy of these items.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Nancy M. Stanley

A project was undertaken to determine the appropriateness of providing subject‐based courseware in an academic library's software center or microcomputer lab. The…

Abstract

A project was undertaken to determine the appropriateness of providing subject‐based courseware in an academic library's software center or microcomputer lab. The courseware was intended to provide remedial instructional support to re‐entry students in selected subjects. For this project, college algebra became the chosen subject because there appeared to be widespread local agreement that a number of adult students needed remedial instruction in college algebra. The question of the appropriateness of CAI in the library remains open. This service seems to be a viable one for academic libraries to offer. Success would be dependent on wide ranging cooperation involving the library, teaching faculty, computing staff, and instructional technologists.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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