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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Eric M. Meyers

Abstract

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Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Rebecca Reynolds, Sam Chu, June Ahn, Simon Buckingham Shum, Preben Hansen, Caroline Haythornthwaite, Hong Huang, Eric M. Meyers and Soo Young Rieh

Many of today’s information and technology systems and environments facilitate inquiry, learning, consciousness-raising and knowledge-building. Such platforms include…

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1955

Abstract

Purpose

Many of today’s information and technology systems and environments facilitate inquiry, learning, consciousness-raising and knowledge-building. Such platforms include e-learning systems which have learning, education and/or training as explicit goals or objectives. They also include search engines, social media platforms, video-sharing platforms, and knowledge sharing environments deployed for work, leisure, inquiry, and personal and professional productivity. The new journal, Information and Learning Sciences, aims to advance our understanding of human inquiry, learning and knowledge-building across such information, e-learning, and socio-technical system contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This article introduces the journal at its launch under new editorship in January, 2019. The article, authored by the journal co-editors and all associate editors, explores the lineage of scholarly undertakings that have contributed to the journal's new scope and mission, which includes past and ongoing scholarship in the following arenas: Digital Youth, Constructionism, Mutually Constitutive Ties in Information and Learning Sciences, and Searching-as-Learning.

Findings

The article offers examples of ways in which the two fields stand to enrich each other towards a greater holistic advancement of scholarship. The article also summarizes the inaugural special issue contents from the following contributors: Caroline Haythornthwaite; Krista Glazewski and Cindy Hmelo-Silver; Stephanie Teasley; Gary Marchionini; Caroline R. Pitt; Adam Bell, Rose Strickman and Katie Davis; Denise Agosto; Nicole Cooke; and Victor Lee.

Originality/value

The article, this special issue, and the journal in full, are among the first formal and ongoing publication outlets to deliberately draw together and facilitate cross-disciplinary scholarship at this integral nexus. We enthusiastically and warmly invite continued engagement along these lines in the journal’s pages, and also welcome related, and wholly contrary points of view, and points of departure that may build upon or debate some of the themes we raise in the introduction and special issue contents.

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2019

John N. Moye

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Learning Differentiated Curriculum Design in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-117-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

Hannelore B. Rader

The following annotated bibliography of materials on orienting users to the library and on instructing them in the use of reference and other resources covers publications…

Abstract

The following annotated bibliography of materials on orienting users to the library and on instructing them in the use of reference and other resources covers publications from 1979. A few items from 1978 were included because information about them had not been available in time for the 1978 listing. Some entries were not annotated because the compiler was unable to secure a copy of the item. The bibliography includes publications on user instruction in all types of libraries and for all types of users from children to adults. To facilitate the use of the list, it has been divided into categories by type of library. Even though the library literature includes many citations to items on user instruction in foreign countries, this bibliography includes only publications in the English language.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Richard F. Kenny and Eileen Schroeder

Compact disk database systems have been proliferating in libraries for the past several years. Producers have promoted them as user‐friendly, self‐instructional systems…

Abstract

Compact disk database systems have been proliferating in libraries for the past several years. Producers have promoted them as user‐friendly, self‐instructional systems that require little on‐site assistance for use. Libraries have placed the systems out for use and have sometimes found this assumption questionable. Numerous articles have appeared on planning for these new reference tools, but only a few have presented evaluations of their implementation and impact on librarians and library services (e.g., Lynn and Bacsany, 1989; Schultz and Salomon, 1990; Welsh, 1989; Steffy and Meyer, 1989; Nissley, et al., 1989; LePoer and Mularski, 1989; Nash and Wilson, 1991). Most have used user surveys to garner data on user satisfaction and effectiveness. Such questionnaires have tended to indicate favorable user reaction to the systems and to the relevance to their needs of the retrieved citations (e.g., Pope, 1989; Bleeker, Tjiam, and Volkers, 1988) while others have shown the former but not the latter phenomenon. Nash and Wilson (1991) found that students were satisfied with their searches but that over one‐third retrieved relatively useless or inappropriate citations. They found the undergraduates they surveyed and/or interviewed had problems critically analyzing the results of their searches. Stewart and Olsen (1988) conducted an experimental comparison of ERIC on CD‐ROM (SilverPlatter) and in print form. Subjects using the CD‐ROM outperformed those using the print index in retrieving relevant references for assigned topics. One particularly interesting result showed subjects using CD‐ROM with no prior training outperforming subjects trained to use print indexes. Further, regardless of treatment group membership, 90 percent felt that the CD‐ROMs would yield the greatest number of useful references. Both instructed and uninstructed CD‐ROM groups rated their methods as easier than print indexes.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2016

Heather A. Haveman, Anand Swaminathan and Eric B. Johnson

We show how organizational forms shape job structures, specifically the variety and types of jobs employees hold, extending previous research on job structures in four…

Abstract

We show how organizational forms shape job structures, specifically the variety and types of jobs employees hold, extending previous research on job structures in four ways. First, the social codes associated with wineries’ generalist and specialist forms constrain the number of jobs and functional areas delineated by job titles. Second, form-based constraints are weakened by institutional rules that impose categorical distinctions on organizations. Third, these constraints are stronger when there is more consensus around forms. Fourth, these constraints are contingent on the legitimacy and resources of organizations of varying ages and sizes.

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The Structuring of Work in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-436-5

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Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2017

Nicholas J. Chagnon

This chapter draws on feminist theorizing on rape culture and victim blaming, and proposes a concept, racialized victim blaming, as a useful tool for understanding…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter draws on feminist theorizing on rape culture and victim blaming, and proposes a concept, racialized victim blaming, as a useful tool for understanding discourse on state violence.

Methodology/approach

The concept of racialized victim blaming is applied to historically analyze the genesis of the carceral state, and deconstruct public debates on police shootings and immigration crises.

Findings

This chapter argues that racialized victim blaming is used as a discursive tool to legitimize and mystify state violence projects. Officials and the media use racialized logics and narratives to blame the victims of state violence for their own suffering, justifying continued or increased state violence.

Originality/value

The concept of victim blaming is most often associated with violence against women. Here I demonstrate that victim blaming is also a useful tool for understanding state violence, particularly when attention is given to the place of racializing narratives.

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Race, Ethnicity and Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-604-4

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Fei Liu, Bo Xiao, Eric T.K. Lim and Chee-Wee Tan

By delineating electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) into numerical rating and opinionated review, the purpose of this paper is to advance a research model that articulates how…

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Abstract

Purpose

By delineating electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) into numerical rating and opinionated review, the purpose of this paper is to advance a research model that articulates how the provision of e-WOM can aid in alleviating consumers’ distrust of online service providers, a key determinant in the former’s adoption of the latter. The authors also endeavor to uncover the role gender plays in moderating the aforementioned relationship between e-WOM and distrust.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model was validated via a field survey administered on 115 college students and faculty members, who had been exposed to a custom-developed online restaurant review website. SmartPLS 2.0.M3 was employed to verify both the measurement and structural properties of the research model.

Findings

Distrust reduces male consumers’ perceptions of usefulness and ease of use toward an online service provider while increasing their adoption intention. For their female counterparts, distrust reduces both perceived ease of use and adoption intention for an online service provider. Additionally, for male consumers, only opinionated review aids in alleviating distrust. Conversely, both numerical rating and opinionated review aid in alleviating the distrust of female consumers. Moreover, in contrast to their female counterparts, male consumers are less susceptible to the influence of cognitive dissonance between numerical rating and opinionated review.

Research limitations/implications

This study integrates distrust with the technology acceptance model (TAM) in an attempt to gain a deeper appreciation of technology acceptance behavior. Furthermore, this study builds on the confirmation bias theory to delineate e-WOM into numerical rating and opinionated review in order to better explicate variations in how males and females react to these two distinct forms of e-WOM. Consistent with the cognitive dissonance theory, the distinction between numerical rating and opinionated review enables further exploration of the impact of cognitive dissonance between these two forms of e-WOM on male and female consumers’ distrust of online service providers. Finally, this study unveils contrasting conflict resolution strategies adopted by male and female consumers to cope with cognitive dissonance in e-WOM.

Practical implications

Findings from this study yield prescriptions for practitioners in terms of how e-WOM can be harnessed to alleviate consumers’ distrust of online service provider. Whereas it is crucial for online service providers to draw on opinionated review to reduce distrust for male consumers, numerical rating should be emphasized for female consumers. This study also sensitizes practitioners to the drawback of providing both numerical rating and opinionated review at the same time due to the potential for cognitive dissonance.

Originality/value

This study is the first to: position distrust within the well-accepted TAM in order to enrich the understanding of technology acceptance behavior; testify to the importance of delineating between numerical rating and opinionated review due to the possibility of cognitive dissonance between these two distinct forms of e-WOM, as well as; uncover contrasting conflict resolution strategies adopted by male and female consumers to cope with cognitive dissonance in accordance with the confirmation bias theory.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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