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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Uzoamaka P. Anakwe, Eric H. Kessler and Edward W. Christensen

This study examined the impact of cultural differences (individualism‐collectivism) on potential users' receptivity towards distance learning. Using a sample of 424…

Abstract

This study examined the impact of cultural differences (individualism‐collectivism) on potential users' receptivity towards distance learning. Using a sample of 424 students enrolled in two northeastern universities, we addressed three research questions: Would an individual's culture affect his or her receptivity towards distance learning? Would an individual's culture affect his or her preference for particular distance learning media? Would an individual's culture affect his or her preference for distance learning in a particular course type? Findings reveal that an individual's culture affects his or her overall attitude towards distance learning. Specifically, we found that individualists' motives and communication patterns are in synch with distance learning as a medium of instruction or communication; whereas collectivists' motives and communication patterns shun any form of mediated instruction or communication as in distance learning. Implications and direction for future studies are discussed.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Diana J. Wong-MingJi, Eric H. Kessler, Shaista E. Khilji and Shanthi Gopalakrishnan

The purpose of this paper is to explore leadership styles and patterns in India, Indonesia, Pakistan, and the USA in order to contribute to a greater understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore leadership styles and patterns in India, Indonesia, Pakistan, and the USA in order to contribute to a greater understanding of global leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses cultural mythologies as a lens (Kessler and Wong-MingJi, 2009a) to extract the most favored leadership traits within selected countries. In doing so, the paper explores historical trajectories and core values of each country to identify their distinctive characteristics. Additionally, leadership styles of well-known business leaders in each culture are examined to develop a comparative discussion of global leadership patterns and styles.

Findings

The paper finds that leaders may share same characteristics across countries, however, their behavioral expressions tend to unfold differently within each context. The paper argues that without context, meanings embedded in cultural mythologies and behaviors often become lost. The paper concludes that a comparative analysis of selected countries reveals a more complex and rich array of cultural meanings, thus offering support to a contextual view of leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Examination of cultural mythologies on leadership makes important theoretical contributions by illustrating that cultural mythologies indeed shape the values, behaviors, and attitudes of global leaders, and provide three important functions that are identified as: cultural bridging, meaning making, and contextual nuancing.

Practical implications

Understanding comparative leadership patterns is critical in international business. The paper offers cultural mythologies as a tool for leaders who seek to cross-cultural boundaries in developing long term and high-quality productive international business relationships.

Originality/value

The value of the study lies in developing a comparative analysis of leadership patterns in three Southeast Asian countries and the USA with the help of cultural mythologies. The paper urges that scholars to move beyond quantification of cultural dimensions to a more contextualized understanding of leadership.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Eric H. Kessler

Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 26 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Eric H. Kessler and Alok K. Chakrabarti

Seventy‐five new product development projects were studied in ten large companies to test potential strategic and process antecedents to quality. Seven factors were found…

Abstract

Seventy‐five new product development projects were studied in ten large companies to test potential strategic and process antecedents to quality. Seven factors were found to significantly increase product quality: high importance placed on quality by top management, high reward for process speed, high project stream breadth, high use of internal (versus external) sources of ideas and technology, low overlap or concurrency of the development process, low turfguarding or “silo” orientation, and high development milestone frequency. These results suggest that managers need to pay attention to both strategic orientation factors and structure‐related organizational capability factors to increase product quality. Staffing‐related factors did not seem to have a strong impact on quality; this suggests that quality is more a function of systemic versus individual factors. Additionally, it was found that there were some differences in the factors associated with high‐quality products between radical and incremental innovations. However, the study is exploratory and further research needs to test these findings as well as extend them to include other interrelationships between factors.

Details

International Journal of Quality Science, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8538

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Paul E. Bierly, Eric H. Kessler and Edward W. Christensen

To improve our understanding of the impact of organizational learning and knowledge on competitive advantage, we propose a framework that includes the constructs of data…

Abstract

To improve our understanding of the impact of organizational learning and knowledge on competitive advantage, we propose a framework that includes the constructs of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. Each of these constructs is then associated with a different type of learning. We further argue that wisdom is an important, albeit missing, construct in the knowledge‐based theory of the firm. A key to organizational wisdom is judgement and decision making, which requires an understanding of the complexity of a situation, but also requires the ability to make sense and simplify so that action can be taken. Three important drivers for the development of organizational wisdom are experience, a passion to learn, and spirituality. Processes for acquiring organizational wisdom such as transformational leadership, organizational culture and knowledge transfer are also discussed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Eric H. Kessler and Michael Charles

Nanotechnology, the ability to manipulate materials on the atomic and molecular level, and thus create novel structures and materials, is at the forefront of a paradigm…

Abstract

Purpose

Nanotechnology, the ability to manipulate materials on the atomic and molecular level, and thus create novel structures and materials, is at the forefront of a paradigm shift whose impact may equal or surpass that of computers and the internet. To cope with this new environment, companies will have to consider new business models, policies, and sources of competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

In this article we examine nanotechnology's potential effect on business strategy, focusing on industry life cycles, strategic groups, environmental forces, and strategic implementation. Several companies involved in nanotechnology are examined, such as IBM, HP, SkyPharma, and Lucent Technologies.

Findings

Numerous conclusions can be inferred from our analyses. First, a company must formulate and execute a dynamic strategic approach to nanotechnology or suffer the consequences. Second, this approach must be reconciled with the strategic group to which the company strives. Third, firms will need to align their business strategies with the changing social, legal, and political forces in the new environment in order to compete successfully. Fourth, companies should leverage research and development efforts in nanotechnology to implement improvements in quality, efficiency, identity and the satisfaction of customer needs.

Practical implications

Companies and leaders alike must be prepared to explore this frontier prudently and strategically to make right decisions for their organizations' success.

Originality/value

Ultimately the article seeks to prompt an understanding of the truly significant potential of nanotechnology to revolutionize industries and businesses, and subsequently firms' strategic paradigms.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Abstract

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Jeris F. Cassel and Sherry K. Little

A national multi‐gigabit‐per‐second research and education network known as the National Research and Education Network is to be established by 1996, according to the…

Abstract

A national multi‐gigabit‐per‐second research and education network known as the National Research and Education Network is to be established by 1996, according to the High‐Performance Computing Act of 1991 (P.L. 102–194) passed in December 1991. Commonly known as the NREN and referred to as the “information highway,” this electronic network is expected to provide scientific, educational, and economic benefits for the United States and to serve as the basis for an all‐encompassing National Information Infrastructure available to all citizens. The idea of the NREN began in the late 1960s in the Department of Defense and its Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) with the development of ARPANet, the first packet‐switching network. This evolved into the Internet, or Interim NREN, after the National Science Foundation (NSF) linked its national supercomputing centers with the NSFNet. The NSFNet is to be the technological backbone for the NREN, which will continue the networking begun by the Internet. Initially, the NREN is intended to interconnect researchers and resources of research institutions, educational institutions, industry, and government in every state.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Mahan Mobashery, Ulrike von Lersner, Kerem Böge, Lukas Fuchs, Georg Schomerus, Miriam Franke, Matthias Claus Angermeyer and Eric Hahn

An increasing number of migrants and refugees seeking asylum in Germany is challenging psychiatrists and psychotherapists in multiple ways. Different cultural belief…

Abstract

Purpose

An increasing number of migrants and refugees seeking asylum in Germany is challenging psychiatrists and psychotherapists in multiple ways. Different cultural belief systems on the causes of mental illness and their treatment have to be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study is to explore perceived causes of depression among Farsi-speaking migrants and refugees from Afghanistan and Iran, which represent two groups with a shared cultural heritage, but originating from very different regimes of mobility. Both are among the largest migrant groups coming to Germany over the past decade.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 50 Iranian and 50 Afghan migrants and refugees, who arrived in Germany in the past 10 years were interviewed, using an unlabeled vignette presenting signs and symptoms of depression. The answers were then coded through inductive content analysis.

Findings

Among Iranians, there was a more significant number of causal attribution to Western psychiatric concepts, whereas Afghans attributed depression more often to the experience of being a refugee without referring to psychological concepts. These differences in attribution did, however, not affect the desire for a social distance toward depressed people. Nonetheless, a higher number of years spent in Germany was associated with less desire for social distance toward persons with depression among Afghans, but not among Iranians.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this is the first study examining perceived causes of depression with Farsi-speaking migrants in Germany and contributes to understanding tendencies in the perception of depression in non-Western migrant groups.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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